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Thread: German wine for German style meal

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default German wine for German style meal

    My wife wants me to make her a German style meal for his birthday
    (spatzel, sausages, applesauce and red cabbage with apples), and I was
    wondering if anyone has suggestions for a German wine, since my wife
    does not like beer.

    Thanks

    tom

  2. #2
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    On 10/14/2010 4:19 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    > My wife wants me to make her a German style meal for his birthday
    > (spatzel, sausages, applesauce and red cabbage with apples), and I was
    > wondering if anyone has suggestions for a German wine, since my wife
    > does not like beer.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > tom


    I think a Riesling would be very nice.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  3. #3
    Alan S Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 14:19:41 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My wife wants me to make her a German style meal for his birthday
    >(spatzel, sausages, applesauce and red cabbage with apples), and I was
    >wondering if anyone has suggestions for a German wine, since my wife
    >does not like beer.
    >
    >Thanks
    >
    >tom


    Any good fruity white should do. A Moselle, Reisling or any of the
    many German regional wines.

    Cheers, Alan, Australia.
    --
    Type 2 Food: http://loraldiabetes.blogspot.com/2006/10/recipes.html
    Travel: http://loraltravel.blogspot.com (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    On Thu, 14 Oct 2010 14:19:41 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My wife wants me to make her a German style meal for his birthday
    > (spatzel, sausages, applesauce and red cabbage with apples), and I was
    > wondering if anyone has suggestions for a German wine, since my wife
    > does not like beer.
    >

    Here are some online suggestions
    http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art44879.asp
    http://www.buzzle.com/articles/love-...taetswein.html

    Personally, I'd choose a dry Gewurztraminer from Chile or New Zealand.
    It's not too sweet and has some spiciness that can stand up to strong
    flavors, like sausage.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  5. #5
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    sf wrote on Thu, 14 Oct 2010 14:43:35 -0700:

    >> My wife wants me to make her a German style meal for his
    >> birthday (spatzel, sausages, applesauce and red cabbage with
    >> apples), and I was wondering if anyone has suggestions for a
    >> German wine, since my wife does not like beer.
    >>

    > Here are some online suggestions
    > http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art44879.asp
    > http://www.buzzle.com/articles/love-...taetswein.html


    > Personally, I'd choose a dry Gewurztraminer from Chile or New
    > Zealand. It's not too sweet and has some spiciness that can
    > stand up to strong flavors, like sausage.


    Not a bad choice. You are more likely to get a dry version from Chile,
    NZ or Australia than Germany.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  6. #6
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My wife wants me to make her a German style meal for his birthday
    > (spatzel, sausages, applesauce and red cabbage with apples), and I was
    > wondering if anyone has suggestions for a German wine, since my wife
    > does not like beer.


    Depending on your preference, I'd suggest a not-too-dry Riesling wine,
    such as a halbtrocken (semi-dry) Kabinett or even Spätlese. The wine's
    balance of sweetness and acidity would match that meal well enough.
    However, if you prefer dry wine, a dry Kabinett or even a dry QbA would
    do nicely enough, too. In both cases, I'd choose a (usually) more
    down-to-earth Rheinpfalz or Rheinhessen wine rather than Mosel or
    Rheingau.

    Short explanation: the "quality levels", i.e. QbA, Kabinett, Spätlese,
    refer to the sugar content of the grapes used, in the rising order.
    Rheinpfalz, Rheinhesen, Mosel, and Rheingau refer to the wine-growing
    areas. Unfortunately, it would make little sense talking about German
    wines without understanding these (and some other) terms.

    Depending on where you live, you might not have much choice, anyway. In
    Texas, Dallas area, for example, even in the otherwise very well stocked
    wine stores, I could not find much that was recommendable in the small
    German section.

    Victor

  7. #7
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My wife wants me to make her a German style meal for his birthday
    > (spatzel, sausages, applesauce and red cabbage with apples), and I was
    > wondering if anyone has suggestions for a German wine, since my wife
    > does not like beer.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > tom



    Liebfraumilch
    http://www.wineintro.com/types/lieb.html

    Or

    Zeller Schwarze Katz

    Dimitri


  8. #8
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    On 14/10/2010 5:19 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    > My wife wants me to make her a German style meal for his birthday
    > (spatzel, sausages, applesauce and red cabbage with apples), and I was
    > wondering if anyone has suggestions for a German wine, since my wife
    > does not like beer.



    i don't know about the liquor stores in your area, but around here they
    tend to display wines by country of origin. Since you are asking, I am
    assuming that you don't know much about wines, so I would rule out a dry
    wine and suggest a white. Mossel and Reisling German white wines.

  9. #9
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal


    [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    > My wife wants me to make her a German style meal for his birthday
    > (spatzel, sausages, applesauce and red cabbage with apples), and I was
    > wondering if anyone has suggestions for a German wine, since my wife
    > does not like beer.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > tom


    I'd keep it authentic. You don't want the wine too sweet but not completely
    dry either. I'd say a good quality Spaetlese Reisling would have some body
    and character, and some sweetness without overpowering the food. At minimum,
    if you get a German wine, get a wine marked "qualitatswein mit pradikat". If
    you can get a specific estate bottle, so much the better. Look for a plain
    black eagle logo on the label and you can be sure it's from a quality
    vineyard. Anything labeled as above other than a kabinett (driest) or
    spaetlese might be too sweet for mealtime consumption.

    A gewurtztraminer would be good too, but I'd go for a French one from the
    Alsace, spicier and much more authentic to the dish and its region of
    origin.

    MartyB



  10. #10
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal


    Victor Sack <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> My wife wants me to make her a German style meal for his birthday
    >> (spatzel, sausages, applesauce and red cabbage with apples), and I
    >> was wondering if anyone has suggestions for a German wine, since my
    >> wife does not like beer.

    >
    > Depending on your preference, I'd suggest a not-too-dry Riesling wine,
    > such as a halbtrocken (semi-dry) Kabinett or even Spätlese. The
    > wine's balance of sweetness and acidity would match that meal well
    > enough. However, if you prefer dry wine, a dry Kabinett or even a dry
    > QbA would do nicely enough, too. In both cases, I'd choose a
    > (usually) more down-to-earth Rheinpfalz or Rheinhessen wine rather
    > than Mosel or Rheingau.
    >
    > Short explanation: the "quality levels", i.e. QbA, Kabinett, Spätlese,
    > refer to the sugar content of the grapes used, in the rising order.
    > Rheinpfalz, Rheinhesen, Mosel, and Rheingau refer to the wine-growing
    > areas. Unfortunately, it would make little sense talking about German
    > wines without understanding these (and some other) terms.
    >
    > Depending on where you live, you might not have much choice, anyway.
    > In Texas, Dallas area, for example, even in the otherwise very well
    > stocked wine stores, I could not find much that was recommendable in
    > the small German section.
    >
    > Victor


    That's generally true of German wine selection here in Kansas City as well.
    A wine store nearby used to have a huge selection of the best German wines.
    Now they are down to a couple racks and the legendary vineyards aren't well
    represented, if at all. I realize the market swung drastically away from
    these wines a number of years ago, but they haven't rebounded and the lack
    of selection is still ridiculous. If I ever see another bottle from JJ Prum
    around here I'll probably stroke out on the spot. Perhaps it will be due to
    the price.

    MartyB



  11. #11
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    On 10/14/2010 4:57 PM, Victor Sack wrote:

    > Depending on where you live, you might not have much choice, anyway. In
    > Texas, Dallas area, for example, even in the otherwise very well stocked
    > wine stores, I could not find much that was recommendable in the small
    > German section.
    >


    St. Germaine makes a passable Reisling. The winery is in, of all
    godforsaken places, Fort Stockton. When in Texas, you have to try Texas
    wine, but don't bother with the stuff fro Del Rio. Yucky and overpriced


    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  12. #12
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    On Oct 14, 2:57*pm, azaze...@koroviev.de (Victor Sack) wrote:

    >
    > Depending on where you live, you might not have much choice, anyway. *In
    > Texas, Dallas area, for example, even in the otherwise very well stocked
    > wine stores, I could not find much that was recommendable in the small
    > German section.
    >


    The amount of choices will definitely depend on the OP's location.
    Surprisingly, Detroit must have a wide selection, judging from the
    people who try to order Piesporter in restaurants where I live.

  13. #13
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    Nunya Bidnits <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If I ever see another bottle from JJ Prum
    > around here I'll probably stroke out on the spot. Perhaps it will be due to
    > the price.


    The low end of Joh. Jos. Prüm offerings sometimes can be had for less
    than 15 euros here - and they are seriously good! Of course, their
    special bottlings from the best vineyards, especially Beerenauslese TBA
    and Eiswein, could run into a few hundreds. These wines are bought
    mostly by Germans. Still, on the whole, even such illustrious German
    wines are still rather lower in price than their qualitative
    counterparts elsewhere.

    Victor

  14. #14
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: German wine for German style meal

    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:

    > St. Germaine makes a passable Reisling. The winery is in, of all
    > godforsaken places, Fort Stockton.


    Don't you mean Ste-Geneviève? The wines I tried were unremarkable.

    > When in Texas, you have to try Texas
    > wine, but don't bother with the stuff fro Del Rio. Yucky and overpriced


    Here is what I once posted about the wines tasted on one of my Texas
    visits some years ago:

    There are some very nice wines in Texas, surprisingly enough and
    we tasted (and drank) quite a few. Llano Estacado have an impressive
    range. Their Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, the Signature red and the
    Passionelle blend are very good. Sister Creek, Fall Creek, and Cap Rock
    all produce very good wines. Bell Mountain make a reasonable rendition
    of German Riesling. Escondido and Ste-Geneviève wines are forgettable,
    though. The wines are generally very good value, with Llano Estacado
    Passionelle costing less than $5.

    Victor

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