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Thread: German Soup

  1. #1
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: German Soup

    This sounds like a good base.

    Cheri

    "Mike Muth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > German Soup
    > Although this is named "German Soup", it's not a German recipe.
    > This is really more of a seasoned broth which serves as a reason
    > to have dumplings or Spätzle.
    > One could certainly add beef or veal to this. Leftover roast
    > works really well.
    > You could also cut the amount of stock used. When I've done
    > that, I've cut back the caraway seeds, but not the onion. What
    > can I say, I like onion.
    > Less the dumplings, this is low-carb. The type and quantity of
    > dumplings you serve with this could certainly remove the low-carb
    > status (I'm guilty. I like Spätzle, too)
    >
    > 1/2 ounce butter
    > 1/2 onion, chopped fine
    > 1 tsp caraway seeds
    > 3 quarts veal or beef stock
    > salt and pepper to taste.
    >
    > Melt the butter in a saucepan.
    > When the butter is very hot, add the onion and caraway seeds.
    > When the onion is lightly browned, add the stock.
    > Season to taste.
    > Simmer for 45 minutes.
    > Serve with dumplings.




  2. #2
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: German Soup

    On Jan 4, 10:11*am, "Mike Muth" <m...@unverbesserlich.net> wrote:
    > German Soup


    > Less the dumplings, this is low-carb. *The type and quantity of
    > dumplings you serve with this could certainly remove the low-carb
    > status (I'm guilty. *I like Sp tzle, too)
    >
    > 1/2 ounce butter
    > 1/2 onion, chopped fine
    > 1 tsp caraway seeds
    > 3 quarts veal or beef stock
    > salt and pepper to taste.
    >
    > Melt the butter in a saucepan.
    > When the butter is very hot, add the onion and caraway seeds.
    > When the onion is lightly browned, add the stock.
    > Season to taste.
    > Simmer for 45 minutes.
    > Serve with dumplings.


    Grandma always used to make Griessnockerl. (Griess == Cream of Wheat).
    Translating from a real German recipe:

    30 g Fat or Butter
    1 Egg
    Salt
    70 g Cream of Wheat
    1 Liter Broth

    Preparation
    Whip fat until foamy, then mix in the egg, then the Cream of Wheat and
    the salt. Let the mixture sit for five minutes, before using two table
    spoons to form into dumplings. Boil the dumplings for five minutes
    either in seething saltwater or right into the broth. Then let sit for
    fifteen minutes w/o heat.

    Grandma would add some chopped parsley along with the salt, for flavor
    and color.

  3. #3
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: German Soup

    On Jan 4, 1:11*pm, "Mike Muth" <m...@unverbesserlich.net> wrote:
    > German Soup
    > Although this is named "German Soup", it's not a German recipe.
    > This is really more of a seasoned broth which serves as a reason
    > to have dumplings or Spätzle.
    > One could certainly add beef or veal to this. *Leftover roast
    > works really well.
    > You could also cut the amount of stock used. *When I've done
    > that, I've cut back the caraway seeds, but not the onion. *What
    > can I say, I like onion.
    > Less the dumplings, this is low-carb. *The type and quantity of
    > dumplings you serve with this could certainly remove the low-carb
    > status (I'm guilty. *I like Spätzle, too)
    >
    > 1/2 ounce butter
    > 1/2 onion, chopped fine
    > 1 tsp caraway seeds
    > 3 quarts veal or beef stock
    > salt and pepper to taste.
    >
    > Melt the butter in a saucepan.
    > When the butter is very hot, add the onion and caraway seeds.
    > When the onion is lightly browned, add the stock.
    > Season to taste.
    > Simmer for 45 minutes.
    > Serve with dumplings.


    I find that caraway seeds don't release much flavor this way, and they
    get stuck in some people's teeth. I use ground seeds when I want the
    flavor but not chunks. Do you have a conversion rate? I know that for
    peooercorns/ground pepper ti is one to one.
    ]
    Jerry

  4. #4
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: German Soup

    On 04/01/2012 5:31 PM, Jerry Avins wrote:

    > I find that caraway seeds don't release much flavor this way,


    That could be a good thing.
    Sorry, but I don't much care for caraway seeds. The recipe looks
    interesting, except for the caraway seeds.

  5. #5
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: German Soup

    On 04/01/2012 6:07 PM, Mike Muth wrote:
    > Dave Smith<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 04/01/2012 5:31 PM, Jerry Avins wrote:
    >>
    >>> I find that caraway seeds don't release much flavor this way,

    >>
    >> That could be a good thing.
    >> Sorry, but I don't much care for caraway seeds. The recipe looks
    >> interesting, except for the caraway seeds.

    >
    > Caraway is frequently used in German and Austrian dishes. However, that
    > doesn't mean you can't make this soup without it. You can just leave the
    > caraway out. Or, you could substitute a bit of fennel or cumin.
    >
    >


    Or parsley??
    I might give it a try and eat some rye bread with it.... without caraway.

  6. #6
    A Moose in Love Guest

    Default Re: German Soup

    On Jan 4, 4:07*pm, spamtrap1888 <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jan 4, 10:11*am, "Mike Muth" <m...@unverbesserlich.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > German Soup
    > > Less the dumplings, this is low-carb. *The type and quantity of
    > > dumplings you serve with this could certainly remove the low-carb
    > > status (I'm guilty. *I like Sp tzle, too)

    >
    > > 1/2 ounce butter
    > > 1/2 onion, chopped fine
    > > 1 tsp caraway seeds
    > > 3 quarts veal or beef stock
    > > salt and pepper to taste.

    >
    > > Melt the butter in a saucepan.
    > > When the butter is very hot, add the onion and caraway seeds.
    > > When the onion is lightly browned, add the stock.
    > > Season to taste.
    > > Simmer for 45 minutes.
    > > Serve with dumplings.

    >
    > Grandma always used to make Griessnockerl. (Griess == Cream of Wheat)..
    > Translating from a real German recipe:
    >
    > 30 g * *Fat or Butter
    > 1 * * * Egg
    > * * * * Salt
    > 70 g * *Cream of Wheat
    > 1 Liter * * * * Broth
    >
    > Preparation
    > Whip fat until foamy, then mix in the egg, then the Cream of Wheat and
    > the salt. Let the mixture sit for five minutes, before using two table
    > spoons to form into dumplings. Boil the dumplings for five minutes
    > either in seething saltwater or right into the broth. Then let sit for
    > fifteen minutes w/o heat.
    >
    > Grandma would add some chopped parsley along with the salt, for flavor
    > and color.


    My mum still makes these; not often, usually she puts lil' ole'
    Hungarian style dumplings in the soup, but sometimes she makes
    Griessnockerl.

  7. #7
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Mike Muth" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > German Soup
    > Although this is named "German Soup", it's not a German recipe.
    > This is really more of a seasoned broth which serves as a reason
    > to have dumplings or Spätzle.
    > One could certainly add beef or veal to this. Leftover roast
    > works really well.
    > You could also cut the amount of stock used. When I've done
    > that, I've cut back the caraway seeds, but not the onion. What
    > can I say, I like onion.
    > Less the dumplings, this is low-carb. The type and quantity of
    > dumplings you serve with this could certainly remove the low-carb
    > status (I'm guilty. I like Spätzle, too)
    >
    > 1/2 ounce butter
    > 1/2 onion, chopped fine
    > 1 tsp caraway seeds
    > 3 quarts veal or beef stock
    > salt and pepper to taste.
    >
    > Melt the butter in a saucepan.
    > When the butter is very hot, add the onion and caraway seeds.
    > When the onion is lightly browned, add the stock.
    > Season to taste.
    > Simmer for 45 minutes.
    > Serve with dumplings.


    Kind of looks like Kminkova Polievka - a Slovak soup I make.

    Kminkova Polievka

    Recipe By: Posted again to r.f.cooking by Barb Schaller, January 4, 2012

    Serving Size: 1

    1 Tbsp. caraway seed
    2 quarts water
    salt

    Zaprashka:
    flour and butter cooked together

    Halushky:
    1 egg
    flour
    salt

    Cook caraway seed in water for 10-15 minutes. In another pan, cook the
    zaprashka - a very light roux. Strain the caraway broth into the
    zaprashka. Make halushky: Beat egg, salt, and flour together on a flat
    saucer and cut little bits of dough into the simmering soup. That's a
    developed skill, one I do not have.

    Notes: Source: Ol¹ga Rak¹ova, 10/92, Presov. This wasn¹t as strongly
    flavored as Mom¹s. Nor as thick. It was excellent! A must to try.




    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

  8. #8
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    > Kind of looks like Kminkova Polievka - a Slovak soup I make.


    That's what I love about you. You almost never make anything I can
    pronounce.



  9. #9
    projectile vomit chick Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    On Jan 4, 8:34*pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net> wrote:
    > In article <je24ph02...@news2.newsguy.com>,
    > *"Mike Muth" <m...@unverbesserlich.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > German Soup
    > > Although this is named "German Soup", it's not a German recipe.
    > > This is really more of a seasoned broth which serves as a reason
    > > to have dumplings or Sp tzle.
    > > One could certainly add beef or veal to this. *Leftover roast
    > > works really well.
    > > You could also cut the amount of stock used. *When I've done
    > > that, I've cut back the caraway seeds, but not the onion. *What
    > > can I say, I like onion.
    > > Less the dumplings, this is low-carb. *The type and quantity of
    > > dumplings you serve with this could certainly remove the low-carb
    > > status (I'm guilty. *I like Sp tzle, too)

    >
    > > 1/2 ounce butter
    > > 1/2 onion, chopped fine
    > > 1 tsp caraway seeds
    > > 3 quarts veal or beef stock
    > > salt and pepper to taste.

    >
    > > Melt the butter in a saucepan.
    > > When the butter is very hot, add the onion and caraway seeds.
    > > When the onion is lightly browned, add the stock.
    > > Season to taste.
    > > Simmer for 45 minutes.
    > > Serve with dumplings.

    >
    > Kind of looks like Kminkova Polievka - a Slovak soup I make.


    Good Lord are you trying to start WWII again?

  10. #10
    news Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Mike Muth" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> German Soup
    >> Although this is named "German Soup", it's not a German recipe.
    >> This is really more of a seasoned broth which serves as a reason
    >> to have dumplings or Spätzle.
    >> One could certainly add beef or veal to this. Leftover roast
    >> works really well.
    >> You could also cut the amount of stock used. When I've done
    >> that, I've cut back the caraway seeds, but not the onion. What
    >> can I say, I like onion.
    >> Less the dumplings, this is low-carb. The type and quantity of
    >> dumplings you serve with this could certainly remove the low-carb
    >> status (I'm guilty. I like Spätzle, too)
    >>
    >> 1/2 ounce butter
    >> 1/2 onion, chopped fine
    >> 1 tsp caraway seeds
    >> 3 quarts veal or beef stock
    >> salt and pepper to taste.
    >>
    >> Melt the butter in a saucepan.
    >> When the butter is very hot, add the onion and caraway seeds.
    >> When the onion is lightly browned, add the stock.
    >> Season to taste.
    >> Simmer for 45 minutes.
    >> Serve with dumplings.

    >
    > Kind of looks like Kminkova Polievka - a Slovak soup I make.
    >
    > Kminkova Polievka
    >
    > Recipe By: Posted again to r.f.cooking by Barb Schaller, January 4, 2012
    >
    > Serving Size: 1
    >
    > 1 Tbsp. caraway seed
    > 2 quarts water
    > salt
    >
    > Zaprashka:
    > flour and butter cooked together
    >
    > Halushky:
    > 1 egg
    > flour
    > salt
    >
    > Cook caraway seed in water for 10-15 minutes. In another pan, cook the
    > zaprashka - a very light roux. Strain the caraway broth into the
    > zaprashka. Make halushky: Beat egg, salt, and flour together on a flat
    > saucer and cut little bits of dough into the simmering soup. That's a
    > developed skill, one I do not have.
    >
    > Notes: Source: Ol¹ga Rak¹ova, 10/92, Presov. This wasn¹t as strongly
    > flavored as Mom¹s. Nor as thick. It was excellent! A must to try.


    My mom would make this, and would force the dough through a colander.



  11. #11
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    > > Kind of looks like Kminkova Polievka - a Slovak soup I make.

    >
    > That's what I love about you. You almost never make anything I can
    > pronounce.


    Not much of of the 'k', okay? Try kMIN-koh-vah poh-LYEHV-kah.
    (Polievka is soup, kmin is caraway).
    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

  12. #12
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    projectile vomit chick <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Jan 4, 8:34*pm, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net> wrote:
    > > Kind of looks like Kminkova Polievka - a Slovak soup I make.

    >
    > Good Lord are you trying to start WWII again?


    Now what'd I do?
    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

  13. #13
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    In article <[email protected]>, "news" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > saucer and cut little bits of dough into the simmering soup. That's a
    > > developed skill, one I do not have.
    > >
    > > Notes: Source: Ol¹ga Rak¹ova, 10/92, Presov. This wasn¹t as strongly
    > > flavored as Mom¹s. Nor as thick. It was excellent! A must to try.

    >
    > My mom would make this, and would force the dough through a colander.


    At the time I learned to make this I did not have a struhadlo, a special
    utensil for cutting/dropping/forming halushky, nor did Mom. I've
    practiced cutting the halushky from a flat plate with a spatula, but the
    struhadlo is a lot simpler. Now they are not so difficult to find -- a
    spaetzle maker would certainly do the job, too. This is the one that
    came from Czechoslovakia in the mid-1960s. I see that they are now made
    from what appears to be stainless steel, unlike the one pictured here:
    <http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...detail&id=416C
    EAF2731C479CE2537850D17036D6404B1677&first=0&FORM= IDFRIR>

    Well, that link is pretty funny -- I found it with an image search and
    didn't look much past the picture of the struhadlo until I noticed that
    the blue plate looks just like some I have. Hey-y-y-y-y. The rest of
    that is from my website -- it shows another type of struhadlo, too, a
    spaetzle-asse from the Bowery Kitchen Supply in NYC.
    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

  14. #14
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    On Jan 5, 9:24*am, Melba's Jammin' <barbschal...@earthlink.net> wrote:
    > In article <4f05b...@news.x-privat.org>, "news" <n...@news.ne> wrote:
    > > "Melba's Jammin'" <barbschal...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    > > > saucer and cut little bits of dough into the simmering soup. *That's a
    > > > developed skill, one I do not have.

    >
    > > > Notes: * Source: *Ol ga Rak ova, 10/92, Presov. *This wasn t asstrongly
    > > > flavored as Mom s. *Nor as thick. *It was excellent! *A must totry.

    >
    > > My mom would make this, and would force the dough through a colander.

    >
    > At the time I learned to make this I did not have a struhadlo, a special
    > utensil for cutting/dropping/forming halushky, nor did Mom. *I've
    > practiced cutting the halushky from a flat plate with a spatula, but the
    > struhadlo is a lot simpler. *Now they are not so difficult to find -- a
    > spaetzle maker would certainly do the job, too. * *This is the one that
    > came from Czechoslovakia in the mid-1960s. *I see that they are now made
    > from what appears to be stainless steel, unlike the one pictured here:
    > <http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...detail&id=416C
    > EAF2731C479CE2537850D17036D6404B1677&first=0&FORM= IDFRIR>
    >
    > Well, that link is pretty funny -- I found it with an image search and
    > didn't look much past the picture of the struhadlo until I noticed that
    > the blue plate looks just like some I have. *Hey-y-y-y-y. *The rest of
    > that is from my website -- it shows another type of struhadlo, too, a
    > spaetzle-asse from the Bowery Kitchen Supply in NYC.


    When I did an image search for struhadlo, the first umpteen pictures
    were box graters. Eventually your holey pan showed up.

  15. #15
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    On 1/5/2012 11:24 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > At the time I learned to make this I did not have a struhadlo, a special
    > utensil for cutting/dropping/forming halushky, nor did Mom. I've
    > practiced cutting the halushky from a flat plate with a spatula, but the
    > struhadlo is a lot simpler. Now they are not so difficult to find -- a
    > spaetzle maker would certainly do the job, too. This is the one that
    > came from Czechoslovakia in the mid-1960s. I see that they are now made
    > from what appears to be stainless steel, unlike the one pictured here:
    > <http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...detail&id=416C
    > EAF2731C479CE2537850D17036D6404B1677&first=0&FORM= IDFRIR>
    >
    > Well, that link is pretty funny -- I found it with an image search and
    > didn't look much past the picture of the struhadlo until I noticed that
    > the blue plate looks just like some I have. Hey-y-y-y-y. The rest of
    > that is from my website -- it shows another type of struhadlo, too, a
    > spaetzle-asse from the Bowery Kitchen Supply in NYC.



    My Grandmother made spaetzle with an old tin pie plate that had a few
    dozen holes drilled through it. I can't even imagine how many meals she
    made with that over her lifetime.

    George L

  16. #16
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio > At
    the time I learned to make this I did not have a struhadlo, a special
    > utensil for cutting/dropping/forming halushky, nor did Mom. I've
    > practiced cutting the halushky from a flat plate with a spatula, but the
    > struhadlo is a lot simpler. Now they are not so difficult to find -- a
    > spaetzle maker would certainly do the job, too. This is the one that
    > came from Czechoslovakia in the mid-1960s. I see that they are now made
    > from what appears to be stainless steel, unlike the one pictured here:
    > <http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=...detail&id=416C
    > EAF2731C479CE2537850D17036D6404B1677&first=0&FORM= IDFRIR>
    >
    > Well, that link is pretty funny -- I found it with an image search and
    > didn't look much past the picture of the struhadlo until I noticed that
    > the blue plate looks just like some I have. Hey-y-y-y-y. The rest of
    > that is from my website -- it shows another type of struhadlo, too, a
    > spaetzle-asse from the Bowery Kitchen Supply in NYC.



    Now my head hurts.



  17. #17
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    On 05/01/2012 1:05 PM, Mike Muth wrote:

    > We have a German Spätzle press (hardly a surprise given that my wife
    > is German). Even so, we don't always use it when making Spätzle.
    > Sometimes, we just put the dough on a cutting board and use a knife to
    > cut off small pieces. The board and knife are much easier to clean
    > than the press.



    I like it that way. It can also be rolled out and cut into strips or
    other shapes. There are many ways to make it, and it's always good.

  18. #18
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    On 05/01/2012 4:56 PM, Mike Muth wrote:

    > We had Spätzle in our Linsesuppe last night. We did it the easy way,
    > though. The wife had a package of Spätzle from Deutsche Kuche (an Aldi
    > house brand) and we used that.
    >
    > My grandmother used to make a Spätzle variation when I was but a lad. The
    > Volga Germans called it Glees (pronounced like "Clayss"). She used the
    > knife and cutting board method most of the time. Sometimes, she used a
    > spoon and spooned it into the pot like a regular dumpling.


    My friend's mother used the slicing at the edge of the cutting board
    method. FIW, they were from the Munich area, The only time I had in in
    Germany it appeared to have been done the same way, and that was in a
    small town in Schwartzwald.


    > Glees was served with boiled potatoes and toasted, buttered cubes of bread.
    > Sometimes, we also had fresh mulberries in cream with it.



    Dang I miss German cooking. I used to spend more time at my friend's
    house than at my own and have been to German several times. I have fond
    memories of good hearty food.



  19. #19
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    On Jan 5, 1:56*pm, Mike Muth <m...@unverbesserlich.net> wrote:

    > My grandmother used to make a Sp tzle variation when I was but a lad. *The
    > Volga Germans called it Glees (pronounced like "Clayss"). *She used the
    > knife and cutting board method most of the time. *Sometimes, she used a
    > spoon and spooned it into the pot like a regular dumpling.
    >
    > Glees was served with boiled potatoes and toasted, buttered cubes of bread.
    > Sometimes, we also had fresh mulberries in cream with it.


    Glees is how Kloesse are pronounced in Franconia:

    http://j-kammerer.suite101.de/echt-f...oeckala-a88394

  20. #20
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: German Soup + a slightly different recipe

    On Jan 5, 2:25*pm, spamtrap1888 <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jan 5, 1:56*pm, Mike Muth <m...@unverbesserlich.net> wrote:
    >
    > > My grandmother used to make a Sp tzle variation when I was but a lad. *The
    > > Volga Germans called it Glees (pronounced like "Clayss"). *She used the
    > > knife and cutting board method most of the time. *Sometimes, she useda
    > > spoon and spooned it into the pot like a regular dumpling.

    >
    > > Glees was served with boiled potatoes and toasted, buttered cubes of bread.
    > > Sometimes, we also had fresh mulberries in cream with it.

    >
    > Glees is how Kloesse are pronounced in Franconia:
    >
    > http://j-kammerer.suite101.de/echt-f...elkloesse-oder...


    Also in Saxony, according to this Leipzig restaurant menu:

    Säggscher Sauerbradn midd Rodgraud un Glees`n

    (Sächsischer Sauerbraten in Reibekuchensoße
    mit Apfelrotkraut und Klößen )

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