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Thread: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

  1. #1
    Manda Ruby Guest

    Default Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    If barely ripe pineapple has bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?

  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    Manda Ruby <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If barely ripe pineapple has bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    >one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    >less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    >(fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?


    Very difficult to say. Sugars within a plant can transform between
    glucose and fructose and back, as the plant develops and ripen.
    They can also shift between monosaccharides, disaccharides, and
    polysaccharides. This has been studied in cases where it is economically
    important, such as wine grapes, but I do not know about pineapple.

    In the base case though as a fruit ripens the polysaccharides (starches)
    break down into more simple sugars.

    Steve

    Steve

  3. #3
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    In article <hecidd$uab$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:


    > Very difficult to say. Sugars within a plant can transform between
    > glucose and fructose and back, as the plant develops and ripen.
    > They can also shift between monosaccharides, disaccharides, and
    > polysaccharides. This has been studied in cases where it is economically
    > important, such as wine grapes, but I do not know about pineapple.


    Many fruits have a significant amount of sucrose in them.

    (raw pineapple, sugar in %)

    Type Sucrose Glucose Fructose
    ==== ======= ======= ========

    all varieties 6 2 2
    extra sweet variety 6 2 2
    tradition varieties 5 2 2

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  4. #4
    Manda Ruby Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    On Nov 22, 4:27*pm, Dan Abel <da...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > In article <hecidd$ua...@blue.rahul.net>,
    > *spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:
    >
    > > Very difficult to say. *Sugars within a plant can transform between
    > > glucose and fructose and back, as the plant develops and ripen. *
    > > They can also shift between monosaccharides, disaccharides, and
    > > polysaccharides. *This has been studied in cases where it is economically
    > > important, such as wine grapes, but I do not know about pineapple.

    >
    > Many fruits have a significant amount of sucrose in them.
    >
    > (raw pineapple, sugar in %)
    >
    > Type * * * * * * * * * * * * *Sucrose * * *Glucose * * *Fructose
    > ==== * * * * * * * * * * * * *======= * * *======= * * *========
    >
    > all varieties * * * * * * * * * 6 * * * * * * 2 * * * * * * 2
    > extra sweet variety * * * * * * 6 * * * * * * 2 * * * * * * 2
    > tradition varieties * * * * * * 5 * * * * * * 2 * * * * * * 2
    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel
    > Petaluma, California USA
    > da...@sonic.net


    Since sucrose and fructose will be converted to glucose in the body,
    regardless of the pineapple one eats, one would end up getting the
    same amount of sugar (the end type, i.e. glucose) for the same size of
    serving, right?

  5. #5
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    Manda Ruby <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Since sucrose and fructose will be converted to glucose in the body,
    >regardless of the pineapple one eats, one would end up getting the
    >same amount of sugar (the end type, i.e. glucose) for the same size of
    >serving, right?


    Yes. But the different metabolic pathways may have some slightly
    different influence, especially on people with certain disease
    conditions.

    Steve

  6. #6
    Manda Ruby Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    On Nov 22, 5:31*pm, spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:
    > Manda Ruby *<manda.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >Since sucrose and fructose *will be converted to glucose in the body,
    > >regardless of the pineapple one eats, one would end up getting the
    > >same amount of sugar (the end type, i.e. glucose) for the same size of
    > >serving, right?

    >
    > Yes. *But the different metabolic pathways may have some slightly
    > different influence, especially on people with certain disease
    > conditions.
    >
    > Steve


    I see.

  7. #7
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    Arri London wrote:
    >
    > Manda Ruby wrote:
    >> If barely ripe pineapple has bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    >> one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    >> less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    >> (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?

    >
    >
    > Get hold of a handheld refractometer to measure total sugars and see
    > Any student chem lab will have one.


    Or you could just use your eyes. When confronted with pineapple pieces,
    you'd be wise to choose the darker, semi-translucent pieces first,
    unless you enjoy sour pine. :-)

  8. #8
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple



    Manda Ruby wrote:
    >
    > If barely ripe pineapple has bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    > one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    > less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    > (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?



    Get hold of a handheld refractometer to measure total sugars and see
    Any student chem lab will have one.

  9. #9
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    dsi1 wrote:
    > Arri London wrote:
    >>
    >> Manda Ruby wrote:
    >>> If barely ripe pineapple has bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    >>> one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    >>> less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    >>> (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?

    >>
    >>
    >> Get hold of a handheld refractometer to measure total sugars and see
    >> Any student chem lab will have one.

    >
    > Or you could just use your eyes. When confronted with pineapple pieces,
    > you'd be wise to choose the darker, semi-translucent pieces first,
    > unless you enjoy sour pine. :-)


    I'd say "yellower" not darker. But that is pieces so not very
    useful when it comes to whole pineapples.

    --
    Jean B.

  10. #10
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    Jean B. wrote:
    > dsi1 wrote:
    >> Arri London wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Manda Ruby wrote:
    >>>> If barely ripe pineapple has bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    >>>> one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    >>>> less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    >>>> (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Get hold of a handheld refractometer to measure total sugars and see
    >>> Any student chem lab will have one.

    >>
    >> Or you could just use your eyes. When confronted with pineapple
    >> pieces, you'd be wise to choose the darker, semi-translucent pieces
    >> first, unless you enjoy sour pine. :-)

    >
    > I'd say "yellower" not darker. But that is pieces so not very useful
    > when it comes to whole pineapples.
    >


    About the only thing you can do for whole pineapples is to sniff the
    part that's broken off the plant. I'll use fresh pineapple as a
    tenderizing marinade although the meat can't be exposed to the stuff
    more than thirty minutes or so. Fresh pine will also neutralize the fire
    of a hot chili pepper faster than a glass of milk.

  11. #11
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple



    "Jean B." wrote:
    >
    > dsi1 wrote:
    > > Arri London wrote:
    > >>
    > >> Manda Ruby wrote:
    > >>> If barely ripe pineapple has bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    > >>> one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    > >>> less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    > >>> (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Get hold of a handheld refractometer to measure total sugars and see
    > >> Any student chem lab will have one.

    > >
    > > Or you could just use your eyes. When confronted with pineapple pieces,
    > > you'd be wise to choose the darker, semi-translucent pieces first,
    > > unless you enjoy sour pine. :-)

    >
    > I'd say "yellower" not darker. But that is pieces so not very
    > useful when it comes to whole pineapples.
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.


    Agreed as to the colour. And the smell; a ripe pineapple smells very
    different when cut than a less ripe one.

    When visiting friends in France, took a walk through a neighbour's
    vineyard. Surreptiously nicked a grape from a vine at one end to taste.
    Very sweet..this was late August so the harvest was near. Confessed to
    the friend who asked if the grapes were ready to pick. Said I'd left the
    refractometer at home so couldn't say However that *is* what owners
    use to determine if the grapes are ready.

  12. #12
    Manda Ruby Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    On Nov 23, 6:18*pm, dsi1 <d...@spamworld.com> wrote:
    > Arri London wrote:
    >
    > > Manda Ruby wrote:
    > >> If barely ripe pineapple has *bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    > >> one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    > >> less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    > >> (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?

    >
    > > Get hold of a handheld refractometer to measure total sugars and see
    > > Any student chem lab will have one.

    >
    > Or you could just use your eyes.

    Your answers to his response made me realize that his response was to
    the question how to choose a ripe pineapple versus not barely ripe
    one, which btw, was not my question. Sorry. My question was not about
    choosing ripe pineapple versus barely ripe pineapple. The question
    was literally about comparing total amount of sugar content in
    pineapples of the same size. Of course, there is a reason behind the
    question and it had to do with eating pineapple of ripe one versus
    barely ripe one. The only justification to choose a barely ripe
    pineapple would be if it has less sugar content than the ripe one of
    the same size when both are the same price.

    > When confronted with pineapple pieces,
    > you'd be wise to choose the darker, semi-translucent pieces first,
    > unless you enjoy sour pine. :-)



  13. #13
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    Manda Ruby wrote:
    > On Nov 23, 6:18 pm, dsi1 <d...@spamworld.com> wrote:
    >> Arri London wrote:
    >>
    >>> Manda Ruby wrote:
    >>>> If barely ripe pineapple has bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    >>>> one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    >>>> less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    >>>> (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?
    >>> Get hold of a handheld refractometer to measure total sugars and see
    >>> Any student chem lab will have one.

    >> Or you could just use your eyes.

    > Your answers to his response made me realize that his response was to
    > the question how to choose a ripe pineapple versus not barely ripe
    > one, which btw, was not my question. Sorry. My question was not about
    > choosing ripe pineapple versus barely ripe pineapple. The question
    > was literally about comparing total amount of sugar content in
    > pineapples of the same size. Of course, there is a reason behind the
    > question and it had to do with eating pineapple of ripe one versus
    > barely ripe one. The only justification to choose a barely ripe
    > pineapple would be if it has less sugar content than the ripe one of
    > the same size when both are the same price.


    My guess is that a ripe pineapple would contain more sugar than a less
    ripe one. What you're probably interested in is percentages of available
    sugars in ripe fruit vs unripe. It might be that the differences are
    considerable, if taste is any kind of a reliable indicator.

    >
    >> When confronted with pineapple pieces,
    >> you'd be wise to choose the darker, semi-translucent pieces first,
    >> unless you enjoy sour pine. :-)

    >


  14. #14
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple



    Manda Ruby wrote:
    >
    > On Nov 23, 6:18 pm, dsi1 <d...@spamworld.com> wrote:
    > > Arri London wrote:
    > >
    > > > Manda Ruby wrote:
    > > >> If barely ripe pineapple has bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    > > >> one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    > > >> less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    > > >> (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?

    > >
    > > > Get hold of a handheld refractometer to measure total sugars and see
    > > > Any student chem lab will have one.

    > >
    > > Or you could just use your eyes.

    > Your answers to his response made me realize that his response was to
    > the question how to choose a ripe pineapple versus not barely ripe
    > one, which btw, was not my question. Sorry. My question was not about
    > choosing ripe pineapple versus barely ripe pineapple. The question
    > was literally about comparing total amount of sugar content in
    > pineapples of the same size.



    And my answer was equally literal! The easiest way to measure sugar
    content is with a refractometer, such as winemakers use. It's first-year
    basic chemistry and quite fun. Your taste will tell you which is sweeter
    but of course that isn't quantitative




    Of course, there is a reason behind the
    > question and it had to do with eating pineapple of ripe one versus
    > barely ripe one. The only justification to choose a barely ripe
    > pineapple would be if it has less sugar content than the ripe one of
    > the same size when both are the same price.
    >
    > > When confronted with pineapple pieces,
    > > you'd be wise to choose the darker, semi-translucent pieces first,
    > > unless you enjoy sour pine. :-)


  15. #15
    Manda Ruby Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    On Nov 24, 11:06*pm, Manda Ruby <manda.r...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Nov 23, 6:18*pm, dsi1 <d...@spamworld.com> wrote:> Arri London wrote:
    >
    > > > Manda Ruby wrote:
    > > >> If barely ripe pineapple has *bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    > > >> one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    > > >> less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    > > >> (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?

    >
    > > > Get hold of a handheld refractometer to measure total sugars and see
    > > > Any student chem lab will have one.

    >
    > > Or you could just use your eyes.

    >
    > *Your answers to his response made me realize that his response was to
    > the question how to choose a ripe pineapple versus not barely ripe


    Oops..I meant to say not so ripe (or barely ripe)

    > one, which btw, was not my question. *Sorry. My question was not about
    > choosing ripe pineapple versus barely ripe pineapple. *The question
    > was literally about comparing total amount of sugar content in
    > pineapples of the same size. *Of course, there is a reason behind the
    > question and it had to do with eating pineapple of ripe one versus
    > barely ripe one. * The only justification to choose a barely ripe
    > pineapple would be if it has less sugar content than the ripe one of
    > the same size when both are the same price.
    >
    >
    >
    > > *When confronted with pineapple pieces,
    > > you'd be wise to choose the darker, semi-translucent pieces first,
    > > unless you enjoy sour pine. :-)- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > - Show quoted text -



  16. #16
    Manda Ruby Guest

    Default Re: Fully ripe pineapple vs. barely ripe pineapple

    On Nov 25, 4:33*pm, Arri London <biot...@ic.ac.uk> wrote:
    > Manda Ruby wrote:
    >
    > > On Nov 23, 6:18 pm, dsi1 <d...@spamworld.com> wrote:
    > > > Arri London wrote:

    >
    > > > > Manda Ruby wrote:
    > > > >> If barely ripe pineapple has *bit of sour ttse unlike the fully ripe
    > > > >> one which is sweet, is the sugar content (fructose form) the same or
    > > > >> less if compared between the pinepples of same size of the two types
    > > > >> (fully ripe pineapple and . barely ripe pineapple)?

    >
    > > > > Get hold of a handheld refractometer to measure total sugars and see
    > > > > Any student chem lab will have one.

    >
    > > > Or you could just use your eyes.

    > > *Your answers to his response made me realize that his response was to
    > > the question how to choose a ripe pineapple versus not barely ripe
    > > one, which btw, was not my question. *Sorry. My question was not about
    > > choosing ripe pineapple versus barely ripe pineapple. *The question
    > > was literally about comparing total amount of sugar content in
    > > pineapples of the same size. *

    >
    > And my answer was equally literal! The easiest way to measure sugar
    > content is with a refractometer, such as winemakers use. It's first-year
    > basic chemistry and quite fun. Your taste will tell you which is sweeter
    > but of course that isn't quantitative


    I was after approximate quantitive but it seems that at the end, ripe
    and sweet or not fully ripe and ehnce not that sweet, thee both would
    give me the same amount of glucose at the end. Then, I might as well
    eat the sweeter one though Steve made a good point about the effect
    on metablic pathway
    by different form of sugar. This link has some interesting info (not
    on sugar content inpineappleabout:
    http://www.sixwise.com/Newsletters/2...Difference.htm

    Glucose, Sucrose or Fructose: Is One Better Than Another?
    http://www.healthnews.com/glucose-su...r-than-another

    "At the end of the study period, both groups had gained similar
    amounts of weight, but those consuming fructose-sweetened drinks
    showed an increase in intra-abdominal fat, the kind that embeds itself
    between tissues in organs, became less sensitive to insulin (the
    hormone released by the pancreas that controls blood sugar), and
    showed signs of dyslipidemia—elevated blood levels of lipids. The
    fructose group also showed increased fat production in the liver,
    elevated LDL or bad cholesterol and larger increases in blood
    triglycerides. The group drinking glucose-sweetened beverages showed
    none of these changes"


    > Of course, there is a reason behind the
    >
    >
    >
    > > question and it had to do with eating pineapple of ripe one versus
    > > barely ripe one. * The only justification to choose a barely ripe
    > > pineapple would be if it has less sugar content than the ripe one of
    > > the same size when both are the same price.

    >
    > > > *When confronted with pineapple pieces,
    > > > you'd be wise to choose the darker, semi-translucent pieces first,
    > > > unless you enjoy sour pine. :-)- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > - Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -



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