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Thread: Fried rice methods

  1. #1
    Phred Guest

    Default Fried rice methods

    G'day mates,

    I thought I was going to have to ask for fried rice recipes because my
    ISP has been playing silly buggers; but either they've come to their
    senses, or I've lucked on a solution, and I can "browse" once more.

    However, having "browsed" via a Google search I'm left with a
    fundamental question about fried rice. (Akin to the egg problem in
    "Gulliver's Travels" :-).

    Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    the rice is chucked in?

    The several recipes I checked out suggest the former has the edge
    (about 3:1 in my small sample) but that may just be due to cultural
    bias because my googling originated in Oz.

    Without wishing to start a new war of the endians, would anyone care
    to comment on their preferred approach to cooking fried rice dishes?

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID


  2. #2
    George Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    Phred wrote:
    > G'day mates,
    >
    > I thought I was going to have to ask for fried rice recipes because my
    > ISP has been playing silly buggers; but either they've come to their
    > senses, or I've lucked on a solution, and I can "browse" once more.
    >
    > However, having "browsed" via a Google search I'm left with a
    > fundamental question about fried rice. (Akin to the egg problem in
    > "Gulliver's Travels" :-).
    >
    > Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > the rice is chucked in?
    >
    > The several recipes I checked out suggest the former has the edge
    > (about 3:1 in my small sample) but that may just be due to cultural
    > bias because my googling originated in Oz.
    >
    > Without wishing to start a new war of the endians, would anyone care
    > to comment on their preferred approach to cooking fried rice dishes?
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >

    The easiest way is to make a thin omelette and then slice it up and
    reintroduce it to the wok towards the end. If you are practiced you can
    make a well by moving the food you are cooking and drop the eggs in the
    well and quickly scramble them then mix together.

  3. #3
    George Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    Phred wrote:
    > G'day mates,
    >
    > I thought I was going to have to ask for fried rice recipes because my
    > ISP has been playing silly buggers; but either they've come to their
    > senses, or I've lucked on a solution, and I can "browse" once more.
    >
    > However, having "browsed" via a Google search I'm left with a
    > fundamental question about fried rice. (Akin to the egg problem in
    > "Gulliver's Travels" :-).
    >
    > Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > the rice is chucked in?
    >
    > The several recipes I checked out suggest the former has the edge
    > (about 3:1 in my small sample) but that may just be due to cultural
    > bias because my googling originated in Oz.
    >
    > Without wishing to start a new war of the endians, would anyone care
    > to comment on their preferred approach to cooking fried rice dishes?
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >

    The easiest way is to make a thin omelette and then slice it up and
    reintroduce it to the wok towards the end. If you are practiced you can
    make a well by moving the food you are cooking and drop the eggs in the
    well and quickly scramble them then mix together.

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 10:23:14 -0400, George <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >If you are practiced you can
    >make a well by moving the food you are cooking and drop the eggs in the
    >well and quickly scramble them then mix together.


    That's how I do it. Use the wok shovel to cut up the egg into tiny
    pieces. Works for me.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 10:23:14 -0400, George <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >If you are practiced you can
    >make a well by moving the food you are cooking and drop the eggs in the
    >well and quickly scramble them then mix together.


    That's how I do it. Use the wok shovel to cut up the egg into tiny
    pieces. Works for me.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  6. #6
    kilikini Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    Phred wrote:
    > G'day mates,
    >
    > I thought I was going to have to ask for fried rice recipes because my
    > ISP has been playing silly buggers; but either they've come to their
    > senses, or I've lucked on a solution, and I can "browse" once more.
    >
    > However, having "browsed" via a Google search I'm left with a
    > fundamental question about fried rice. (Akin to the egg problem in
    > "Gulliver's Travels" :-).
    >
    > Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > the rice is chucked in?
    >
    > The several recipes I checked out suggest the former has the edge
    > (about 3:1 in my small sample) but that may just be due to cultural
    > bias because my googling originated in Oz.
    >
    > Without wishing to start a new war of the endians, would anyone care
    > to comment on their preferred approach to cooking fried rice dishes?
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.


    Hey, Phred. There's a couple of ways you can do this. Cook up the
    scrambled egg first, cut it into strips and add it at the end OR (and this
    is what I prefer to do) pour the raw eggs into a "well" of the mix at the
    very end and scramble it around so it sticks to all the grains of the rice.
    Cook it until the egg is done. But to each his/her own.

    kili



  7. #7
    kilikini Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    Phred wrote:
    > G'day mates,
    >
    > I thought I was going to have to ask for fried rice recipes because my
    > ISP has been playing silly buggers; but either they've come to their
    > senses, or I've lucked on a solution, and I can "browse" once more.
    >
    > However, having "browsed" via a Google search I'm left with a
    > fundamental question about fried rice. (Akin to the egg problem in
    > "Gulliver's Travels" :-).
    >
    > Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > the rice is chucked in?
    >
    > The several recipes I checked out suggest the former has the edge
    > (about 3:1 in my small sample) but that may just be due to cultural
    > bias because my googling originated in Oz.
    >
    > Without wishing to start a new war of the endians, would anyone care
    > to comment on their preferred approach to cooking fried rice dishes?
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.


    Hey, Phred. There's a couple of ways you can do this. Cook up the
    scrambled egg first, cut it into strips and add it at the end OR (and this
    is what I prefer to do) pour the raw eggs into a "well" of the mix at the
    very end and scramble it around so it sticks to all the grains of the rice.
    Cook it until the egg is done. But to each his/her own.

    kili



  8. #8
    PeterLucas Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    [email protected] (Phred) wrote in news:6c74lmF3fgqdbU1
    @mid.individual.net:


    >
    > Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > the rice is chucked in?
    >
    > The several recipes I checked out suggest the former has the edge
    > (about 3:1 in my small sample) but that may just be due to cultural
    > bias because my googling originated in Oz.
    >
    > Without wishing to start a new war of the endians, would anyone care
    > to comment on their preferred approach to cooking fried rice dishes?
    >



    I dry my (ccoked) rice out in the fridge for a couple of days. Lay it
    out on a tray, cover with paper towel and put in the beer fridge.

    I stir fry all the veges/bacon/prawns etc first, to 'season' the wok.
    Then I whisk the eggs, add a bit of water and white pepper, and cook in
    the wok. Keep tossing and turning, and when it starts to cook right
    thru, chop it up into small pieces as you're tossing it. Take it out and
    add to the veges/prawns etc. Then you cook the rice, season, and add the
    other stuff just before serving.

    Go to Coles or Woolworths 'International' food section and look for
    Indofood Nasi Goreng seasoning. Add that to the rice as you're cooking
    it. Bloody nice!!



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    The path of a warrior never deviating,
    one has to become not just a part of nature
    but a force of nature,
    acting in accordance with the laws of the universe.
    (Getsumei No Michi, the Moonlit Path)

  9. #9
    PeterLucas Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    [email protected] (Phred) wrote in news:6c74lmF3fgqdbU1
    @mid.individual.net:


    >
    > Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > the rice is chucked in?
    >
    > The several recipes I checked out suggest the former has the edge
    > (about 3:1 in my small sample) but that may just be due to cultural
    > bias because my googling originated in Oz.
    >
    > Without wishing to start a new war of the endians, would anyone care
    > to comment on their preferred approach to cooking fried rice dishes?
    >



    I dry my (ccoked) rice out in the fridge for a couple of days. Lay it
    out on a tray, cover with paper towel and put in the beer fridge.

    I stir fry all the veges/bacon/prawns etc first, to 'season' the wok.
    Then I whisk the eggs, add a bit of water and white pepper, and cook in
    the wok. Keep tossing and turning, and when it starts to cook right
    thru, chop it up into small pieces as you're tossing it. Take it out and
    add to the veges/prawns etc. Then you cook the rice, season, and add the
    other stuff just before serving.

    Go to Coles or Woolworths 'International' food section and look for
    Indofood Nasi Goreng seasoning. Add that to the rice as you're cooking
    it. Bloody nice!!



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    The path of a warrior never deviating,
    one has to become not just a part of nature
    but a force of nature,
    acting in accordance with the laws of the universe.
    (Getsumei No Michi, the Moonlit Path)

  10. #10
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    [email protected] (Phred) wrote in news:6c74lmF3fgqdbU1
    @mid.individual.net:

    > G'day mates,
    >
    > I thought I was going to have to ask for fried rice recipes because my
    > ISP has been playing silly buggers; but either they've come to their
    > senses, or I've lucked on a solution, and I can "browse" once more.
    >
    > However, having "browsed" via a Google search I'm left with a
    > fundamental question about fried rice. (Akin to the egg problem in
    > "Gulliver's Travels" :-).
    >
    > Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > the rice is chucked in?
    >
    > The several recipes I checked out suggest the former has the edge
    > (about 3:1 in my small sample) but that may just be due to cultural
    > bias because my googling originated in Oz.
    >
    > Without wishing to start a new war of the endians, would anyone care
    > to comment on their preferred approach to cooking fried rice dishes?
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >


    I take the leftover cooked rice and stir in a egg or two. then go on
    with the cooking. So the egg is added to the rice before the fried rice
    is attempted.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan




  11. #11
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    [email protected] (Phred) wrote in news:6c74lmF3fgqdbU1
    @mid.individual.net:

    > G'day mates,
    >
    > I thought I was going to have to ask for fried rice recipes because my
    > ISP has been playing silly buggers; but either they've come to their
    > senses, or I've lucked on a solution, and I can "browse" once more.
    >
    > However, having "browsed" via a Google search I'm left with a
    > fundamental question about fried rice. (Akin to the egg problem in
    > "Gulliver's Travels" :-).
    >
    > Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > the rice is chucked in?
    >
    > The several recipes I checked out suggest the former has the edge
    > (about 3:1 in my small sample) but that may just be due to cultural
    > bias because my googling originated in Oz.
    >
    > Without wishing to start a new war of the endians, would anyone care
    > to comment on their preferred approach to cooking fried rice dishes?
    >
    > Cheers, Phred.
    >


    I take the leftover cooked rice and stir in a egg or two. then go on
    with the cooking. So the egg is added to the rice before the fried rice
    is attempted.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan




  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    Phred <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > the rice is chucked in?


    When the rice is almost done, make a well about 3-4" (8-10cm) across
    in the center of the pan so that the bottom of the pan is
    accessible. Break the egg(s) into the well and gently scramble the
    eggs in that space until the eggs are almost set (some rice will
    fall into it, don't worry). Then fold a little bit of the rice over
    top and chop the eggs up with your spatula until they set
    completely, then fold in the rest of the rice over it and continue
    stir-frying normally for a few more moments until it all gets mixed
    around. This is how I, and most Chinese restaurants do it.

    -sw

  13. #13
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    Phred <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > the rice is chucked in?


    When the rice is almost done, make a well about 3-4" (8-10cm) across
    in the center of the pan so that the bottom of the pan is
    accessible. Break the egg(s) into the well and gently scramble the
    eggs in that space until the eggs are almost set (some rice will
    fall into it, don't worry). Then fold a little bit of the rice over
    top and chop the eggs up with your spatula until they set
    completely, then fold in the rest of the rice over it and continue
    stir-frying normally for a few more moments until it all gets mixed
    around. This is how I, and most Chinese restaurants do it.

    -sw

  14. #14
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > Phred wrote:
    > > Namely: �Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > > the rice is chucked in?

    >
    > When the rice is almost done, make a well about 3-4" (8-10cm) across
    > in the center of the pan so that the bottom of the pan is
    > accessible. �Break the egg(s) into the well and gently scramble the
    > eggs in that space until the eggs are almost set (some rice will
    > fall into it, don't worry). �Then fold a little bit of the rice over
    > top and chop the eggs up with your spatula until they set
    > completely, then fold in the rest of the rice over it and continue
    > stir-frying normally for a few more moments until it all gets mixed
    > around. �This is how I, and most TEXAS Chinese restaurants do it.


    Fercocktah Fried Rice.

    Any *Chinatown* Chinese restaurant makes up a huge batch of *basic*
    "pork fly lice" at the beginning of the shift. Individual portions
    are reheated as ordered, and adding specific ingredients, ie. chicken,
    shrimp, lobster, etc., as per style ordered or all of the above+ for
    their house special version. Many Chinatown restaurants don't add egg
    to fly lice, of those few who do it's always precooked thin omelets
    cut into julienne or dice.... very little egg is added, it's
    primarilly a garnish... and it's almost always just the yolk, the
    whites are used alone in many dishes.

    Texas has no real Chinatown, there are a few mixed Asian ghettos (as
    much Mexican as Asian), noted for violence, not food.


  15. #15
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > Phred wrote:
    > > Namely: �Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    > > the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    > > the rice is chucked in?

    >
    > When the rice is almost done, make a well about 3-4" (8-10cm) across
    > in the center of the pan so that the bottom of the pan is
    > accessible. �Break the egg(s) into the well and gently scramble the
    > eggs in that space until the eggs are almost set (some rice will
    > fall into it, don't worry). �Then fold a little bit of the rice over
    > top and chop the eggs up with your spatula until they set
    > completely, then fold in the rest of the rice over it and continue
    > stir-frying normally for a few more moments until it all gets mixed
    > around. �This is how I, and most TEXAS Chinese restaurants do it.


    Fercocktah Fried Rice.

    Any *Chinatown* Chinese restaurant makes up a huge batch of *basic*
    "pork fly lice" at the beginning of the shift. Individual portions
    are reheated as ordered, and adding specific ingredients, ie. chicken,
    shrimp, lobster, etc., as per style ordered or all of the above+ for
    their house special version. Many Chinatown restaurants don't add egg
    to fly lice, of those few who do it's always precooked thin omelets
    cut into julienne or dice.... very little egg is added, it's
    primarilly a garnish... and it's almost always just the yolk, the
    whites are used alone in many dishes.

    Texas has no real Chinatown, there are a few mixed Asian ghettos (as
    much Mexican as Asian), noted for violence, not food.


  16. #16
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    wrote:

    > On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 10:23:14 -0400, George <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>If you are practiced you can
    >>make a well by moving the food you are cooking and drop the eggs in the
    >>well and quickly scramble them then mix together.

    >
    > That's how I do it. Use the wok shovel to cut up the egg into tiny
    > pieces. Works for me.


    Count me for eggs-last in-the-wok make-a-well-for-them.


    --
    Blinky
    Is your ISP dropping Usenet?
    Need a new feed?
    http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  17. #17
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    wrote:

    > On Sun, 22 Jun 2008 10:23:14 -0400, George <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>If you are practiced you can
    >>make a well by moving the food you are cooking and drop the eggs in the
    >>well and quickly scramble them then mix together.

    >
    > That's how I do it. Use the wok shovel to cut up the egg into tiny
    > pieces. Works for me.


    Count me for eggs-last in-the-wok make-a-well-for-them.


    --
    Blinky
    Is your ISP dropping Usenet?
    Need a new feed?
    http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  18. #18
    George Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    Sheldon wrote:
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> Phred wrote:
    >>> Namely: �Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    >>> the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    >>> the rice is chucked in?

    >> When the rice is almost done, make a well about 3-4" (8-10cm) across
    >> in the center of the pan so that the bottom of the pan is
    >> accessible. �Break the egg(s) into the well and gently scramble the
    >> eggs in that space until the eggs are almost set (some rice will
    >> fall into it, don't worry). �Then fold a little bit of the rice over
    >> top and chop the eggs up with your spatula until they set
    >> completely, then fold in the rest of the rice over it and continue
    >> stir-frying normally for a few more moments until it all gets mixed
    >> around. �This is how I, and most TEXAS Chinese restaurants do it.

    >
    > Fercocktah Fried Rice.
    >
    > Any *Chinatown* Chinese restaurant makes up a huge batch of *basic*
    > "pork fly lice" at the beginning of the shift. Individual portions
    > are reheated as ordered, and adding specific ingredients, ie. chicken,
    > shrimp, lobster, etc., as per style ordered or all of the above+ for
    > their house special version. Many Chinatown restaurants don't add egg
    > to fly lice, of those few who do it's always precooked thin omelets
    > cut into julienne or dice.... very little egg is added, it's
    > primarilly a garnish... and it's almost always just the yolk, the
    > whites are used alone in many dishes.
    >


    Thats about as accurate as your prior claim that they don't use rice
    cookers.


    > Texas has no real Chinatown, there are a few mixed Asian ghettos (as
    > much Mexican as Asian), noted for violence, not food.
    >


  19. #19
    George Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    Sheldon wrote:
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> Phred wrote:
    >>> Namely: �Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    >>> the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    >>> the rice is chucked in?

    >> When the rice is almost done, make a well about 3-4" (8-10cm) across
    >> in the center of the pan so that the bottom of the pan is
    >> accessible. �Break the egg(s) into the well and gently scramble the
    >> eggs in that space until the eggs are almost set (some rice will
    >> fall into it, don't worry). �Then fold a little bit of the rice over
    >> top and chop the eggs up with your spatula until they set
    >> completely, then fold in the rest of the rice over it and continue
    >> stir-frying normally for a few more moments until it all gets mixed
    >> around. �This is how I, and most TEXAS Chinese restaurants do it.

    >
    > Fercocktah Fried Rice.
    >
    > Any *Chinatown* Chinese restaurant makes up a huge batch of *basic*
    > "pork fly lice" at the beginning of the shift. Individual portions
    > are reheated as ordered, and adding specific ingredients, ie. chicken,
    > shrimp, lobster, etc., as per style ordered or all of the above+ for
    > their house special version. Many Chinatown restaurants don't add egg
    > to fly lice, of those few who do it's always precooked thin omelets
    > cut into julienne or dice.... very little egg is added, it's
    > primarilly a garnish... and it's almost always just the yolk, the
    > whites are used alone in many dishes.
    >


    Thats about as accurate as your prior claim that they don't use rice
    cookers.


    > Texas has no real Chinatown, there are a few mixed Asian ghettos (as
    > much Mexican as Asian), noted for violence, not food.
    >


  20. #20
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice methods

    George wrote:
    > Phred wrote:
    >> G'day mates,
    >>
    >> I thought I was going to have to ask for fried rice recipes because my
    >> ISP has been playing silly buggers; but either they've come to their
    >> senses, or I've lucked on a solution, and I can "browse" once more.
    >>
    >> However, having "browsed" via a Google search I'm left with a
    >> fundamental question about fried rice. (Akin to the egg problem in
    >> "Gulliver's Travels" :-).
    >>
    >> Namely: Does one cook the eggs *first*, then add them back later in
    >> the process; or does one add them *during* the process, just before
    >> the rice is chucked in?
    >>
    >> The several recipes I checked out suggest the former has the edge
    >> (about 3:1 in my small sample) but that may just be due to cultural
    >> bias because my googling originated in Oz.
    >>
    >> Without wishing to start a new war of the endians, would anyone care
    >> to comment on their preferred approach to cooking fried rice dishes?
    >>
    >> Cheers, Phred.
    >>

    > The easiest way is to make a thin omelette and then slice it up and
    > reintroduce it to the wok towards the end. If you are practiced you can
    > make a well by moving the food you are cooking and drop the eggs in the
    > well and quickly scramble them then mix together.


    I have 4 Chinese cookbooks. Three say to use the 'well' method and one
    says to fry the egg on its own and add it back, but I think George's
    solution is best. Until you get really good with using the wok, do the
    egg separately.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
    Good Friends. Good Life

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