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Thread: Fried rice final

  1. #1
    notbob Guest

    Default Fried rice final

    I finally took the plunge and did classic fried rice, last night. I took
    plenty of time, researched it thoroughly, assembled all the right
    ingredients, set up my meez and tools, and it came out just right. It's
    bonehaed simple if all the prep is right.

    I defrosted some peas/carrots and frozen corn. I omletted 2 eggs and cut
    them up. I already had cold rice from last night. Chopped a bunch of grn
    onions and gathered my condis, oyster sauce, soy, and sesame oil.

    3 T of oil in a hot wok till smoking. Tossed in veggies and let come to
    sizzle. tossed in rice and eggs and onions and twisted the turkey fryer
    burner to hi and did min stir. In a minute, the rice was sizzling. Added
    condis to taste, stirred thoroughly and plated. YUM! Better than any
    resto fried rice I recall.

    Next, sweet n sour pork.

    nb

  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice final

    On Jul 19, 4:27*am, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:
    > I finally took the plunge and did classic fried rice, last night. *I took
    > plenty of time, researched it thoroughly, assembled all the right
    > ingredients, set up my meez and tools, and it came out just right. *It's
    > bonehaed simple if all the prep is right. *
    > '[snip]
    > 3 T of oil in a hot wok till smoking. *Tossed in veggies and let come to
    > sizzle. *tossed in rice and eggs and onions and twisted the turkey fryer
    > burner to hi and did min stir. *In a minute, the rice was sizzling. *Added
    > condis to taste, stirred thoroughly and plated. *YUM! *Better than any
    > resto fried rice I recall.
    >

    Tell us about the turkey fryer burner -aem

  3. #3
    dandelion Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice final

    twisted the turkey fryer
    > > burner to hi and did min stir. >

    > Tell us about the turkey fryer burner * * *-aem


    Yes Please Do.


  4. #4
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice final

    notbob wrote:

    > I finally took the plunge and did classic fried rice, last night. I took
    > plenty of time, researched it thoroughly, assembled all the right
    > ingredients, set up my meez and tools, and it came out just right. It's
    > bonehaed simple if all the prep is right.
    >
    > I defrosted some peas/carrots and frozen corn.



    I do so like the Chinese style wok cooking, and i agree with you, its
    almost instintucal, intuative.

    But i would have started out with the fresh veggies, but then i live
    just a few blocks from an Asian shopping area with tons of fresh foods.

    > I omletted 2 eggs and cut
    > them up. I already had cold rice from last night. Chopped a bunch of grn
    > onions and gathered my condis, oyster sauce, soy, and sesame oil.



    I dont use the prepared sauces anymore, too salty. I bought a Japanese
    "Golden Curry" the other day for the first time in over a year. Never
    again, i couldnt believe how salty it was.

    I often use garlic, ginger, 5 spices, sometimes a bit of curry powder,
    dark sesame oil, eschalots frites, mustard, red szechwan pepper,
    sometimes a bit of dried or pickleled cabbage. But in general i find
    the best flavors come from the ingrediants, the meats & fruits & veggies
    even more than the spices, as they tend more to complement the dish
    rather than set the style or tone of it. The obvious exceptions being
    the curries and some of the very spicy hot Asian dishes.

    The first time i ever used a wok a had a past life experiance, it was a
    bit eerie.

    But i have been a convert to Chinese wok cooking since.

    We get here in the SF Bay Area commercialy porduced & packaged "Chinese
    sausage" that is often times a mix of various meats (shrimp & chicken is
    my favorite)and spices, one has to look at the ingredients lable and
    shop around, expermint a bit, to find the one that appeals, but a small
    dice of a tiny bit of the good ones can be all one needs to stir fry
    with a bit of rice. Duck sausages are often available in Chinese
    markets but i dont like duck so have never tried the sausage.

    >
    >
    > 3 T of oil in a hot wok till smoking. Tossed in veggies and let come to
    > sizzle. tossed in rice and eggs and onions and twisted the turkey fryer
    > burner to hi and did min stir. In a minute, the rice was sizzling. Added
    > condis to taste, stirred thoroughly and plated. YUM! Better than any
    > resto fried rice I recall.
    >
    > Next, sweet n sour pork.
    >
    > nb


    A little place near me does a stir fried curry noodle & peas, it can be
    ordered with or without shrimp.

    I dont know precesly how they do it but it is a dry noodle, cooked, with
    peas and shrimp but served with no sauce. Not swimming in a heavy curry
    sauce the way so many places make it. But rather just a nice saffron
    colored & flavored rice noodle with bright greeen peas and & pink shrimp.

    Im assuming the curry powder is tossed dry with the noodles while stir
    frying them with the peas and shrimp, probly in some peanut oil.
    --

    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.
    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  5. #5
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice final

    notbob wrote:
    > I finally took the plunge and did classic fried rice, last night. I took
    > plenty of time, researched it thoroughly, assembled all the right
    > ingredients, set up my meez and tools, and it came out just right. It's
    > bonehaed simple if all the prep is right.
    >
    > I defrosted some peas/carrots and frozen corn. I omletted 2 eggs and cut
    > them up. I already had cold rice from last night. Chopped a bunch of grn
    > onions and gathered my condis, oyster sauce, soy, and sesame oil.
    >
    > 3 T of oil in a hot wok till smoking. Tossed in veggies and let come to
    > sizzle. tossed in rice and eggs and onions and twisted the turkey fryer
    > burner to hi and did min stir. In a minute, the rice was sizzling. Added
    > condis to taste, stirred thoroughly and plated. YUM! Better than any
    > resto fried rice I recall.
    >
    > Next, sweet n sour pork.
    >
    > nb
    >



    nb, I am so happy you gave it a try. Fried rice is an easy side dish
    when you have leftover fried rice. I like lots of green onions in mine,
    a few bean sprouts and eggs. It cooks super fast and it takes no time
    at all. Good for you. :-)


    Becca

  6. #6
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice final

    On 2009-07-19, Becca <[email protected]> wrote:

    > a few bean sprouts and eggs.


    I'm also doing my first mung bean sprouts. Not sure if I got it right. I
    may have tried too many mung seeds initially. Lotta unsprouted seeds.
    We'll see. :|

    nb

  7. #7
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice final

    On Sun 19 Jul 2009 08:39:44p, notbob told us...

    > On 2009-07-19, Becca <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> a few bean sprouts and eggs.

    >
    > I'm also doing my first mung bean sprouts. Not sure if I got it right. I
    > may have tried too many mung seeds initially. Lotta unsprouted seeds.
    > We'll see. :|
    >
    > nb
    >


    Years ago I tried my hand at sprouting mung beans, and with great success.
    However, I tried every recommended method of removing the hulls after
    sprouting and never found any of them totally effective or easy. After that
    I just starting buying fresh ones at the store.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Everything I eat has been proved by some doctor or other to be a
    deadly poison, and everything I don't eat has been proved to be
    indispensable for life. But I go marching on. George Bernard Shaw




  8. #8
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice final

    On Sun, 19 Jul 2009 15:01:13 -0700, Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:

    >
    > We get here in the SF Bay Area commercialy porduced & packaged "Chinese
    > sausage" that is often times a mix of various meats (shrimp & chicken is
    > my favorite)and spices, one has to look at the ingredients lable and
    > shop around, expermint a bit, to find the one that appeals, but a small
    > dice of a tiny bit of the good ones can be all one needs to stir fry
    > with a bit of rice. Duck sausages are often available in Chinese
    > markets but i dont like duck so have never tried the sausage.
    >


    chinese sausages seems to have gotten very expensive where i live (in
    maryland). i recall it being cheaper. but i intend to try some in my
    fried rice, just to change it up a little.

    your pal,
    blake

  9. #9
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice final

    blake murphy wrote:

    > On Sun, 19 Jul 2009 15:01:13 -0700, Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:
    >
    >
    > >We get here in the SF Bay Area commercialy porduced & packaged "Chinese
    > >sausage" that is often times a mix of various meats (shrimp & chicken is
    > >my favorite)and spices, one has to look at the ingredients lable and
    > >shop around, expermint a bit, to find the one that appeals, but a small
    > >dice of a tiny bit of the good ones can be all one needs to stir fry
    > >with a bit of rice. Duck sausages are often available in Chinese
    > >markets but i dont like duck so have never tried the sausage.
    > >

    >
    >
    > chinese sausages seems to have gotten very expensive where i live (in
    > maryland). i recall it being cheaper. but i intend to try some in my
    > fried rice, just to change it up a little.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    I can write down some brand names next time in over in Chinatown if you
    like. I have tried several differant commercial varities.
    Unfortunatly, there is a resturant here that produces their own, so i
    have not purchased any of the commercial, packaged sausages in a couple
    of years.

    I think this resturant must do catering or supply other resutrants,
    they have, besides the ubiquitous cooked whole ducks, whole pigs, sides
    of beef, ribs, slabs of pork and whole chickens fully cooked and ready
    to eat as well as their various sauages.

    Its really a rather small seating area but with a hugh kitchen that
    extends into the seating area. And when im there i often see Asians
    purchasing whole pigs or sides of beef "to go".

    The sausages run anywhere from 3 - 6 dollars a pound, the less
    exspensive, is made of various 'offal' intestines, hearts, gizzards and
    such, the more exspensive get into the ground and/or chopped flesh of
    other animals along with their partiicular spices and the resturant
    version has no preservatives or MSG in them.

    One lady who was purchasing the inexspensive sausage told, at lest i
    think she told me (her limited English was better than my non existent
    Chinese)that she makes stock with them. "Boil for soup" was her
    explination.

    I would not have know what they were made of except that in my frugality
    and timidity i ordered the least exspensive the first time and the
    waiter was nice enough to inform me of what they were made of. So i went
    with the more exspensive chicken and shrimp sausage and they are delicious.

    --

    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.
    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  10. #10
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice final

    On Tue, 21 Jul 2009 12:26:36 -0700, Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:

    > blake murphy wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 19 Jul 2009 15:01:13 -0700, Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>We get here in the SF Bay Area commercialy porduced & packaged "Chinese
    >>>sausage" that is often times a mix of various meats (shrimp & chicken is
    >>>my favorite)and spices, one has to look at the ingredients lable and
    >>>shop around, expermint a bit, to find the one that appeals, but a small
    >>>dice of a tiny bit of the good ones can be all one needs to stir fry
    >>>with a bit of rice. Duck sausages are often available in Chinese
    >>>markets but i dont like duck so have never tried the sausage.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> chinese sausages seems to have gotten very expensive where i live (in
    >> maryland). i recall it being cheaper. but i intend to try some in my
    >> fried rice, just to change it up a little.
    >>
    >> your pal,
    >> blake

    >
    > I can write down some brand names next time in over in Chinatown if you
    > like. I have tried several differant commercial varities.


    thanks for the kind offer, but you needn't take the trouble.

    > Unfortunatly, there is a resturant here that produces their own, so i
    > have not purchased any of the commercial, packaged sausages in a couple
    > of years.
    >
    > I think this resturant must do catering or supply other resutrants,
    > they have, besides the ubiquitous cooked whole ducks, whole pigs, sides
    > of beef, ribs, slabs of pork and whole chickens fully cooked and ready
    > to eat as well as their various sauages.
    >


    sounds like a nice place.

    your pal,
    blake

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