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Thread: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

  1. #1
    thudpucker Guest

    Default Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    When I was young and dinosaurs roamed the earth, fried rice was
    brownish, had a particular aroma and flavor, and was *chewy*. It
    seems to me that the fried rice we're getting these days is soft and
    fluffy rather than chewy and lacks altogether that particular aroma
    and flavor that used to characterize fried rice.

    I googled "real Chinese fried rice recipe," and noticed that some
    129,000 others had done the same.

    The first recipe I looked at said to start with two cups of instant
    rice.

    The second recipe I looked at--for beef fried rice--told me to brown
    my hamburger in a nonstick skillet.

    I'm a n00b on r.f.c., but I'm betting that fried rice has been done to
    death here. What's the secret?



  2. #2
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    On Sun, 03 May 2009 22:17:58 -0700, thudpucker <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >When I was young and dinosaurs roamed the earth, fried rice was
    >brownish, had a particular aroma and flavor, and was *chewy*. It
    >seems to me that the fried rice we're getting these days is soft and
    >fluffy rather than chewy and lacks altogether that particular aroma
    >and flavor that used to characterize fried rice.
    >
    >I'm a n00b on r.f.c., but I'm betting that fried rice has been done to
    >death here. What's the secret?


    When I worked at a Cantonese restaurant (also when dinosaurs roamed
    the earth), I always thought that the fried rice had kind of a smoky
    flavor. Liquid smoke would be outrageously weird, I think, but I
    found something that adds part of that special something that's
    missing these days ... sesame oil.

    It's also important to use day-old rice. If you're a spontaneous
    cook, just use a 1:1 ration of water to rice, as below.

    Here is a recipe from Betty Crocker's 'Chinese Cookbook' by Leeann
    Chin, altered (as usual) by me. I always make a double batch, because
    one is never enough:


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Chicken Fried Rice

    Recipe By :Carol Peterson
    Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Poultry Rice
    Side Dishes

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    ---Rice Prep---
    1 cup white rice
    1 cup water
    ---Chicken Prep---
    2 chicken breast halves -- skinned and boned
    1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
    1 dash white pepper
    ---Other Prep---
    2 eggs -- slightly beaten
    4 whole green onions -- chopped
    1 cup bean sprouts -- rinsed
    ---Cooking---
    1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    2 tablespoons soy sauce
    1 dash white pepper
    1/2 teaspoon sesame oil

    Bring rice and water to a boil in a 2-quart saucepan. Cover tightly,
    reduce heat, and simmer for 20 minutes. Set aside.

    Cut chicken into 1/4-inch pieces. Toss chicken, cornstarch, and dash
    of white pepper.

    Prepare eggs, green onions, and bean sprouts for cooking. Set aside,
    in separate bowls.

    Heat wok until 1 or 2 drops of water sizzle and dissipate when
    sprinkled in wok. Add 1 tablespoon oil; rotate wok to coat side. Add
    eggs; cook and stir until eggs are thickened throughout but still
    moist. Remove eggs from wok.

    Heat 2 tablespoons oil in wok, coating sides of wok. Add chicken and
    stir-fry until meat turns white. Add rice and stir-fry for 1 minute.
    Stir in soy sauce and a dash of white pepper. Add eggs, bean sprouts,
    then green onions, continuously moving food in the wok for about 30
    seconds. Sprinkle with sesame oil, toss, and serve.

    Cuisine:
    "Chinese"
    Source:
    "adapted from Betty Crocker's 'Chinese Cookbook' by Leeann Chin"
    Copyright:
    "1981"

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    NOTES : May substitute chicken with fresh or leftover diced pork, ham,
    beef, or shrimp.

    --
    Change "invalid" to James Bond's agent number to reply.

  3. #3
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    thudpucker wrote:
    > When I was young and dinosaurs roamed the earth, fried rice was
    > brownish, had a particular aroma and flavor, and was *chewy*. It
    > seems to me that the fried rice we're getting these days is soft and
    > fluffy rather than chewy and lacks altogether that particular aroma
    > and flavor that used to characterize fried rice.
    >
    > I googled "real Chinese fried rice recipe," and noticed that some
    > 129,000 others had done the same.
    >
    > The first recipe I looked at said to start with two cups of instant
    > rice.
    >
    > The second recipe I looked at--for beef fried rice--told me to brown
    > my hamburger in a nonstick skillet.
    >
    > I'm a n00b on r.f.c., but I'm betting that fried rice has been done to
    > death here. What's the secret?
    >
    >


    A few tips: Use Chinese long grain rice or any long grain rice, day old
    is good. Mix in oil to coat grains before adding to frypan - the reality
    is that you should use a good quantity. Don't use butter! As was said
    before - a little sesame oil is a good idea. Use a bit of oyster sauce.
    Use MSG - that's kinda important. Good luck!

  4. #4
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    dsi1 said...

    > A few tips: Use Chinese long grain rice or any long grain rice, day old
    > is good. Mix in oil to coat grains before adding to frypan - the reality
    > is that you should use a good quantity. Don't use butter! As was said
    > before - a little sesame oil is a good idea. Use a bit of oyster sauce.
    > Use MSG - that's kinda important. Good luck!



    Why MSG??? It's not good for you.

    Thumbs down to MSG, imho.

    Andy
    --
    Eat first, talk later.

  5. #5
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    Andy wrote:
    > dsi1 said...
    >
    >> A few tips: Use Chinese long grain rice or any long grain rice, day old
    >> is good. Mix in oil to coat grains before adding to frypan - the reality
    >> is that you should use a good quantity. Don't use butter! As was said
    >> before - a little sesame oil is a good idea. Use a bit of oyster sauce.
    >> Use MSG - that's kinda important. Good luck!

    >
    >
    > Why MSG??? It's not good for you.


    Forget about it Andy... it's Chinafood.

    >
    > Thumbs down to MSG, imho.


    Chinese food, with no MSG. That's like no salt or no oyster sauce or soy
    sauce or no pepper. MSG works great in potato salad too. No MSG in these
    dishes is like dropping the bottom out - they taste flat and plain. MSG
    to a cook is like Eve biting that forbidden fruit - once your eyes are
    open to what MSG does, you'll never be able to go back. My suggestion is
    that you don't ever take a bite of that apple.

    >
    > Andy


  6. #6
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    dsi1 said...

    > Andy wrote:
    >> dsi1 said...
    >>
    >>> A few tips: Use Chinese long grain rice or any long grain rice, day old
    >>> is good. Mix in oil to coat grains before adding to frypan - the

    reality
    >>> is that you should use a good quantity. Don't use butter! As was said
    >>> before - a little sesame oil is a good idea. Use a bit of oyster sauce.
    >>> Use MSG - that's kinda important. Good luck!

    >>
    >>
    >> Why MSG??? It's not good for you.

    >
    > Forget about it Andy... it's Chinafood.
    >
    >>
    >> Thumbs down to MSG, imho.

    >
    > Chinese food, with no MSG. That's like no salt or no oyster sauce or soy
    > sauce or no pepper. MSG works great in potato salad too. No MSG in these
    > dishes is like dropping the bottom out - they taste flat and plain. MSG
    > to a cook is like Eve biting that forbidden fruit - once your eyes are
    > open to what MSG does, you'll never be able to go back. My suggestion is
    > that you don't ever take a bite of that apple.



    I sure won't.

    My uncle, a food scientist for years did research on MSG. He died at 36-
    years-old. The food lab denied MSG caused his death in court and won. It
    was a very devastating ordeal.

    Thumbs down to MSG!!!

    If you can't flavor food naturally, don't bother at all.

    MSG is a bulls*it shortcut!!!

    Best,

    Andy
    --
    Eat first, talk later.

  7. #7
    thudpucker Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    On Mon, 04 May 2009 04:43:37 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >dsi1 said...
    >
    >> A few tips: Use Chinese long grain rice or any long grain rice, day old
    >> is good. Mix in oil to coat grains before adding to frypan - the reality
    >> is that you should use a good quantity. Don't use butter! As was said
    >> before - a little sesame oil is a good idea. Use a bit of oyster sauce.
    >> Use MSG - that's kinda important. Good luck!

    >
    >
    >Why MSG??? It's not good for you.
    >
    >Thumbs down to MSG, imho.
    >
    >Andy


    MSG triggers a cluster headache, so it's a nonstarter for me.


  8. #8
    thudpucker Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    On Mon, 04 May 2009 00:40:59 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 03 May 2009 22:17:58 -0700, thudpucker <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>When I was young and dinosaurs roamed the earth, fried rice was
    >>brownish, had a particular aroma and flavor, and was *chewy*. It
    >>seems to me that the fried rice we're getting these days is soft and
    >>fluffy rather than chewy and lacks altogether that particular aroma
    >>and flavor that used to characterize fried rice.
    >>
    >>I'm a n00b on r.f.c., but I'm betting that fried rice has been done to
    >>death here. What's the secret?

    >
    >When I worked at a Cantonese restaurant (also when dinosaurs roamed
    >the earth), I always thought that the fried rice had kind of a smoky
    >flavor. Liquid smoke would be outrageously weird, I think, but I
    >found something that adds part of that special something that's
    >missing these days ... sesame oil.
    >
    >It's also important to use day-old rice. If you're a spontaneous
    >cook, just use a 1:1 ration of water to rice, as below.
    >
    >Here is a recipe from Betty Crocker's 'Chinese Cookbook' by Leeann
    >Chin, altered (as usual) by me. I always make a double batch, because
    >one is never enough:
    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Chicken Fried Rice


    Recipe is duly saved off. Thank you.

  9. #9
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    thudpucker said...

    > On Mon, 04 May 2009 04:43:37 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>dsi1 said...
    >>
    >>> A few tips: Use Chinese long grain rice or any long grain rice, day old
    >>> is good. Mix in oil to coat grains before adding to frypan - the

    reality
    >>> is that you should use a good quantity. Don't use butter! As was said
    >>> before - a little sesame oil is a good idea. Use a bit of oyster sauce.
    >>> Use MSG - that's kinda important. Good luck!

    >>
    >>
    >>Why MSG??? It's not good for you.
    >>
    >>Thumbs down to MSG, imho.
    >>
    >>Andy

    >
    > MSG triggers a cluster headache, so it's a nonstarter for me.



    thudpucker,

    From my research (senior HS project on food additives) that's what is
    referred to as "Chinese Restaurant Syndrome."

    Steer clear of MSG!!! EVERYBODY!!!

    Don't ask me about Mountain Dew!

    Best,

    Andy
    --
    HONK if I'm paying your mortgage!

  10. #10
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    thudpucker wrote:
    > When I was young and dinosaurs roamed the earth, fried rice was
    > brownish, had a particular aroma and flavor, and was *chewy*. It
    > seems to me that the fried rice we're getting these days is soft and
    > fluffy rather than chewy and lacks altogether that particular aroma
    > and flavor that used to characterize fried rice.
    >
    > I googled "real Chinese fried rice recipe," and noticed that some
    > 129,000 others had done the same.
    >
    > The first recipe I looked at said to start with two cups of instant
    > rice.
    >
    > The second recipe I looked at--for beef fried rice--told me to brown
    > my hamburger in a nonstick skillet.
    >
    > I'm a n00b on r.f.c., but I'm betting that fried rice has been done to
    > death here. What's the secret?
    >
    >

    The secret to that old brown rice is a tad of bead molasses. I
    discovered this decades ago, courtesy of Joyce Chen.

    --
    Jean B.

  11. #11
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    Allow me to elaborate.

    Once upon a time MSG grew into the national health consciousness as a bad
    food additive.

    The ingredient listing of MSG on a food packaging was lowering sales.

    My uncle's job was to break down MSG into it's separate catalysts and enzymes
    that could be listed separately on the ingredients label, not having to
    explicitly list MSG.

    Food crime, if you ask me!!!

    I'm sadful that my uncle didn't know what he was doing!

    Maybe he did, I dunno. None of us did.

    I still miss him dearly!

    Andy

  12. #12
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    Andy wrote on Mon, 04 May 2009 07:33:56 -0500:

    > Once upon a time MSG grew into the national health
    > consciousness as a bad food additive.


    > The ingredient listing of MSG on a food packaging was lowering
    > sales.


    > My uncle's job was to break down MSG into it's separate
    > catalysts and enzymes that could be listed separately on the
    > ingredients label, not having to explicitly list MSG.


    > Food crime, if you ask me!!!


    > I'm sadful that my uncle didn't know what he was doing!


    > Maybe he did, I dunno. None of us did.


    > I still miss him dearly!


    Sorry about your uncle but MSG is a simple well-known *natural* product
    present in many foods. It does not contain catalysts and enzymes but
    only sodium and glutamic acid, which has the formula C5H9NO4 and is a
    simple dibasic amino acid. Commercial MSG can also be be termed
    "natural" since it is produced by fermentation.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  13. #13
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    James Silverton said...

    > Andy wrote on Mon, 04 May 2009 07:33:56 -0500:
    >
    >> Once upon a time MSG grew into the national health
    >> consciousness as a bad food additive.

    >
    >> The ingredient listing of MSG on a food packaging was lowering
    >> sales.

    >
    >> My uncle's job was to break down MSG into it's separate
    >> catalysts and enzymes that could be listed separately on the
    >> ingredients label, not having to explicitly list MSG.

    >
    >> Food crime, if you ask me!!!

    >
    >> I'm sadful that my uncle didn't know what he was doing!

    >
    >> Maybe he did, I dunno. None of us did.

    >
    >> I still miss him dearly!

    >
    > Sorry about your uncle but MSG is a simple well-known *natural* product
    > present in many foods. It does not contain catalysts and enzymes but
    > only sodium and glutamic acid, which has the formula C5H9NO4 and is a
    > simple dibasic amino acid. Commercial MSG can also be be termed
    > "natural" since it is produced by fermentation.



    James,

    Perhaps, as you say but, we thought it a deadly food additive after the
    fact. It still is.

    Best,

    Andy
    --
    HONK if I'm paying your mortgage!

  14. #14
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    On Mon, 04 May 2009 05:59:43 -0500, Andy wrote:

    > dsi1 said...
    >
    >> Andy wrote:
    >>> dsi1 said...
    >>>
    >>>> A few tips: Use Chinese long grain rice or any long grain rice, day old
    >>>> is good. Mix in oil to coat grains before adding to frypan - the

    > reality
    >>>> is that you should use a good quantity. Don't use butter! As was said
    >>>> before - a little sesame oil is a good idea. Use a bit of oyster sauce.
    >>>> Use MSG - that's kinda important. Good luck!
    >>>
    >>> Why MSG??? It's not good for you.

    >>
    >> Forget about it Andy... it's Chinafood.
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Thumbs down to MSG, imho.

    >>
    >> Chinese food, with no MSG. That's like no salt or no oyster sauce or soy
    >> sauce or no pepper. MSG works great in potato salad too. No MSG in these
    >> dishes is like dropping the bottom out - they taste flat and plain. MSG
    >> to a cook is like Eve biting that forbidden fruit - once your eyes are
    >> open to what MSG does, you'll never be able to go back. My suggestion is
    >> that you don't ever take a bite of that apple.

    >
    > I sure won't.
    >
    > My uncle, a food scientist for years did research on MSG. He died at 36-
    > years-old. The food lab denied MSG caused his death in court and won.


    unless he was injecting the ****, highly doubtful.

    blake

  15. #15
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    On Sun, 03 May 2009 22:17:58 -0700, thudpucker wrote:

    > When I was young and dinosaurs roamed the earth, fried rice was
    > brownish, had a particular aroma and flavor, and was *chewy*. It
    > seems to me that the fried rice we're getting these days is soft and
    > fluffy rather than chewy and lacks altogether that particular aroma
    > and flavor that used to characterize fried rice.
    >
    > I googled "real Chinese fried rice recipe," and noticed that some
    > 129,000 others had done the same.
    >
    > The first recipe I looked at said to start with two cups of instant
    > rice.
    >
    > The second recipe I looked at--for beef fried rice--told me to brown
    > my hamburger in a nonstick skillet.
    >
    > I'm a n00b on r.f.c., but I'm betting that fried rice has been done to
    > death here. What's the secret?


    fried rice is a perennial topic, but not to worry, there are plenty of
    those. try this method, which i posted last year:

    o.k., i've read the thread thus far, and my method (or rather one adapted
    from one of those outlined in 'jim lee's chinese cookbook,' which i got in
    the mid-70's) is different in a couple of respects.

    first, the rice is cooked pretty firm, using 1:1 rice to water. i don't
    usually to cook it the day beforehand; i keep meaning to try this to see if
    it makes a difference.

    second, i don't usually use leftover meats. i dice raw pork about 1/4" or
    slightly larger, and put it in teriaki sauce to marinate while cutting up
    the vegetables. celery, or carrot, diced, is marinated in rice vinegar.
    lots of diced onion.

    the eggs are mixed with soy sauce and lots of black pepper, and 1/4-1/2
    tsp. chili oil.

    then the pork is cooked as you would for any chinese stir-fry, with garlic
    and slivers of ginger. remove.

    cook vegetables until almost done, add back in the pork, and then the rice.
    stir to mix well, and to heat up the rice. the last step is to add the
    egg mixture, stirring well so that it begins to adhere to the rice and
    other items.

    this results in a 'moister' product than most recipes, and it reheats in
    the microwave (with a little added water) quite well. it doesn't look like
    the rice served in restaurants, being tan-to-brown overall.

    amounts for my typical batch:

    about two chops worth of pork (about the size of your palm times two)

    2 cups cooked rice

    2 or 3 ginger slices, shredded, more if desired

    1-2 garlic cloves, minced, more if desired

    2 stalks celery or two carrots (celery is better)

    one medium-large onion

    for the egg mixture:

    2 eggs

    1/4 cup soy sauce (i've been using pearl river bridge brand of late)

    1/4-1/2 tsp chili oil

    1/4-1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

    1 tsp msg

    oil for cooking

    *

    i think it's pretty damn good. the black pepper and ginger is what makes
    it. i like it peppy.

    this is not typically a side dish for me, but dinner. the ratio of
    meat/vegetables to rice is fairly high. (jim lee calls for double the
    amount of rice and two cups of meat, with just 1/4 cup of sliced button
    mushrooms.)

    3-4 servings (bowls?)

    *

    in terms of what you're after, the fresh meat angle probably isn't
    important, but rather cooking with the eggs and spices mixed together.
    obviously, omit the m.s.g. if it doesn't agree with you. (i once used
    dark, or thick, soy by mistake and it turned out *really* brown.)

    good luck in your quest. i agree that most of the fried rice we see today
    lacks character.

    your pal,
    blake

  16. #16
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    On May 4, 5:59*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > dsi1 said...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Andy wrote:
    > >> dsi1 said...

    >
    > >>> A few tips: Use Chinese long grain rice or any long grain rice, day old
    > >>> is good. Mix in oil to coat grains before adding to frypan - the

    > reality
    > >>> is that you should use a good quantity. Don't use butter! As was said
    > >>> before - a little sesame oil is a good idea. Use a bit of oyster sauce.
    > >>> Use MSG - that's kinda important. Good luck!

    >
    > >> Why MSG??? It's not good for you.

    >
    > > Forget about it Andy... it's Chinafood.

    >
    > >> Thumbs down to MSG, imho.

    >
    > > Chinese food, with no MSG. That's like no salt or no oyster sauce or soy
    > > sauce or no pepper. MSG works great in potato salad too. No MSG in these
    > > dishes is like dropping the bottom out - they taste flat and plain. MSG
    > > to a cook is like Eve biting that forbidden fruit - once your eyes are
    > > open to what MSG does, you'll never be able to go back. My suggestion is
    > > that you don't ever take a bite of that apple.

    >
    > I sure won't.
    >
    > My uncle, a food scientist for years did research on MSG. He died at 36-
    > years-old. The food lab denied MSG caused his death in court and won. It
    > was a very devastating ordeal.
    >
    > Thumbs down to MSG!!!
    >
    > If you can't flavor food naturally, don't bother at all.
    >
    > MSG is a bulls*it shortcut!!!
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy
    > --
    > Eat first, talk later.


    Hey Andy!
    MY uncle Michael was a Food Chemist for Pet Ritz and invented frozen
    piecrust. He died of Hodgkin's Disease in 1957, but nobody blamed
    frozen pies. Of course in the 30s he was forced by the Nazis to do
    biological warfare research at the Sorbonne . . .
    <vbg>
    Lynn in Fargo

  17. #17
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    On May 3, 10:17*pm, thudpucker <t...@pucker.com> wrote:
    > When I was young and dinosaurs roamed the earth, fried rice was
    > brownish, had a particular aroma and flavor, and was *chewy*. *It
    > seems to me that the fried rice we're getting these days is soft and
    > fluffy rather than chewy and lacks altogether that particular aroma
    > and flavor that used to characterize fried rice.
    > [snip]
    > I'm a n00b on r.f.c., but I'm betting that fried rice has been done to
    > death here. *What's the secret?


    Yes, there have been many threads about fried rice but no consensus
    about "the secret." People tout their favorite flavors, whether it's
    a particular kind of soy sauce, or oyster sauce, or sesame oil. My
    own opinion about what you're missing is heat, gigantic, smoky heat.
    You must get your well-seasoned pan or wok blazingly hot and keep it
    there. That's where that particular aroma comes from.

    The chewiness you're missing is probably the difference between just
    heating the rice, which is what often happens at home and some
    restaurants, and actually frying. To get that fried texture you need
    not only the high heat, but enough oil. Nowadays it's a habit to use
    as little oil as we think possible. Not in this case. After
    stirfrying and removing the protein and any veggies, add more oil and
    let it get to the smoking point, then put in the rice and stir/toss
    well to coat and fry every grain. -aem


  18. #18
    pure kona Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    On Mon, 04 May 2009 00:40:59 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 03 May 2009 22:17:58 -0700, thudpucker <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >When I worked at a Cantonese restaurant (also when dinosaurs roamed
    >the earth), I always thought that the fried rice had kind of a smoky
    >flavor. Liquid smoke would be outrageously weird, I think, but I
    >found something that adds part of that special something that's
    >missing these days ... sesame oil.
    >
    >It's also important to use day-old rice. If you're a spontaneous
    >cook, just use a 1:1 ration of water to rice, as below.
    >
    >Here is a recipe from Betty Crocker's 'Chinese Cookbook' by Leeann
    >Chin, altered (as usual) by me. I always make a double batch, because


    My haircut guy, part Indonesian, makes fried rice for wedding banquets
    etc. and has given me his recipe but I don't remember the details. BUT
    I do remember he says as you do Carol, use day old rice (and in Hawaii
    we use Calrose rice), and he does use sesame oil. I think one of the
    tastiest parts is he finely chops cabbage and then just quickly stir
    fries it and then mixes it in with the almost finished fried rice so
    there is crunch. IIRC there is a pile of dishes and pans when he is
    done.

    aloha,
    cea

  19. #19
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be

    Andy wrote:
    > dsi1 said...
    >
    >> Andy wrote:
    >>> dsi1 said...
    >>>
    >>>> A few tips: Use Chinese long grain rice or any long grain rice, day old
    >>>> is good. Mix in oil to coat grains before adding to frypan - the

    > reality
    >>>> is that you should use a good quantity. Don't use butter! As was said
    >>>> before - a little sesame oil is a good idea. Use a bit of oyster sauce.
    >>>> Use MSG - that's kinda important. Good luck!
    >>>
    >>> Why MSG??? It's not good for you.

    >> Forget about it Andy... it's Chinafood.
    >>
    >>> Thumbs down to MSG, imho.

    >> Chinese food, with no MSG. That's like no salt or no oyster sauce or soy
    >> sauce or no pepper. MSG works great in potato salad too. No MSG in these
    >> dishes is like dropping the bottom out - they taste flat and plain. MSG
    >> to a cook is like Eve biting that forbidden fruit - once your eyes are
    >> open to what MSG does, you'll never be able to go back. My suggestion is
    >> that you don't ever take a bite of that apple.

    >
    >
    > I sure won't.
    >
    > My uncle, a food scientist for years did research on MSG. He died at 36-
    > years-old. The food lab denied MSG caused his death in court and won. It
    > was a very devastating ordeal.


    Given the circumstances, your disapproval makes a lot of sense.

    >
    > Thumbs down to MSG!!!
    >
    > If you can't flavor food naturally, don't bother at all.
    >
    > MSG is a bulls*it shortcut!!!
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy


  20. #20
    =?iso-8859-1?B?VEZNrg==?= Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice ain't what it used to be



    "pure kona" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 04 May 2009 00:40:59 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sun, 03 May 2009 22:17:58 -0700, thudpucker <[email protected]>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>When I worked at a Cantonese restaurant (also when dinosaurs roamed
    >>the earth), I always thought that the fried rice had kind of a smoky
    >>flavor. Liquid smoke would be outrageously weird, I think, but I
    >>found something that adds part of that special something that's
    >>missing these days ... sesame oil.
    >>
    >>It's also important to use day-old rice. If you're a spontaneous
    >>cook, just use a 1:1 ration of water to rice, as below.
    >>
    >>Here is a recipe from Betty Crocker's 'Chinese Cookbook' by Leeann
    >>Chin, altered (as usual) by me. I always make a double batch, because

    >
    > My haircut guy, part Indonesian, makes fried rice for wedding banquets
    > etc. and has given me his recipe but I don't remember the details. BUT
    > I do remember he says as you do Carol, use day old rice (and in Hawaii
    > we use Calrose rice), and he does use sesame oil. I think one of the
    > tastiest parts is he finely chops cabbage and then just quickly stir
    > fries it and then mixes it in with the almost finished fried rice so
    > there is crunch. IIRC there is a pile of dishes and pans when he is
    > done.



    It's always like that when a man cooks. ;-)

    I have a question about the Hawaiian calrose rice. I brought a 1 pound bag
    back from Maui with me. When I looked at the ingredients, it was milled
    rice and sugar. I know there was sugar in there, but they may not have
    worded it so simply.

    When I bought calrose rice here, the ingredients state "milled rice".
    Still comes out just as sticky, what's the deal?

    I'll have the lau lau with 2 scoops Auntie.

    --
    Aloha Nui Loa,
    TFM®


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