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Thread: Fried rice

  1. #1
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Fried rice

    Well the zip loc veggie bags worked fine to "dry" the cooked rice in the
    fridge.

    For me Fried Rice is a catch all with no special recipe - it's what ever I
    seem to have on hand;

    Some or all of the following:

    Cabbage
    Napa
    Carrot
    Peas
    Celery
    Bok Choy
    Onion
    Green Onion
    Scallion
    Mexican Onion
    Egg
    Meat
    No Meat
    Kitchen sink
    Rice of course.
    Sesame seeds
    Garlic
    Ginger
    cauliflower
    Broccoli
    green beans

    Oil (vegetable not OO).

    for seasoning; (some or all)

    Rice vinegar
    sesame oil
    sugar
    Soy (any kind)
    ginger (above too)
    molasses
    honey
    5 spice
    Kitchen cabinet.

    YOU?

    Dimitri




  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    On Jun 11, 8:41*am, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > Well the zip loc veggie bags worked fine to "dry" the cooked rice in the
    > fridge.
    >
    > For me Fried Rice is a catch all with no special recipe - it's what ever I
    > seem to have on hand;
    >
    > Some or all of the following:

    [snip list]
    >
    > YOU?


    For a special occasion I like to do a version of Yangchow, the well-
    known shrimp version, but yes, whatever's on hand is what most often
    determines the fried rice. There are just a few essentials, and I
    will not make fried rice if I don't have cold cooked rice, scallions,
    and egg.

    We have an easy Asian market source of fresh noodles, so chow mein
    gets a similar, frequent musgovian approach. Interestingly, (maybe, a
    little, to some) a few things seem right for one, wrong for the
    other. Egg, for example, is always in our fried rice, never in our
    chow mein. Onions (not scallions) are never in the fried rice but
    often in chow mein. Same for bean sprouts, never in the rice, almost
    essential for the chow mein. But most meats and most veggies can go
    in either.

    The other main difference between fried rice and chow mein is that I
    seldom use any of the sauces or condiments with fried rice. I'll put
    the soy sauce, chili sauce, oyster sauce, etc. on the table, not in
    the wok. In contrast, I always create a little sauce in the pan for
    the chow mein. What kind of sauce varies with the dish's components
    and my mood, but for some reason it just seems like it needs it. -
    aem

  3. #3
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    [email protected] wrote:
    >The other main difference between fried rice and chow mein is that I
    >seldom use any of the sauces or condiments with fried rice. I'll put
    >the soy sauce, chili sauce, oyster sauce, etc. on the table, not in
    >the wok.


    I certainly like my fried rice dry, but think it at least needs soy sauce and
    sesame oil for flavor.

    >In contrast, I always create a little sauce in the pan for
    >the chow mein. What kind of sauce varies with the dish's components
    >and my mood, but for some reason it just seems like it needs it. -


    How much do these improvised sauces vary? Do you thicken them with corn starch
    or water chestnut powder?

    Orlando

  4. #4
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    On Jun 11, 9:44 am, Orlando Enrique Fiol <of...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > aem_ag...@yahoo.com wrote:
    > >The other main difference between fried rice and chow mein is that I
    > >seldom use any of the sauces or condiments with fried rice. I'll put
    > >the soy sauce, chili sauce, oyster sauce, etc. on the table, not in
    > >the wok.

    >
    > I certainly like my fried rice dry, but think it at least needs soy sauce and
    > sesame oil for flavor.
    >

    Often I will add a few drops of sesame oil to the egg when I scramble
    it in the wok. Sometimes the components of the dish will have had a
    little soy added--for example, I might cut up a leftover grilled
    chicken thigh and stir fry it briefly with soy and ginger to flavor it
    in preparation for the dish.

    > >In contrast, I always create a little sauce in the pan for
    > >the chow mein. What kind of sauce varies with the dish's components
    > >and my mood, but for some reason it just seems like it needs it. -

    >
    > How much do these improvised sauces vary? Do you thicken them with corn starch
    > or water chestnut powder?
    >

    Most of the time they are nothing special, just the standard soy
    sauce, rice wine, garlic and ginger. Sometimes the other components
    of the dish will seem to want more--could be black bean sauce, or
    oyster sauce, or chile sauce, or even hoisin sauce. Occasionally I'll
    have spicy bean curd on hand and I'll stir some of that in
    (particularly if the dish will include green beans or long beans, with
    which I think it pairs really well). I thicken them with corn starch
    about half the time, maybe less. All of this is just personal
    preference, not because of any rules or tradition. -aem


  5. #5
    jay Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice

    On Thu, 11 Jun 2009 08:41:08 -0700, Dimitri wrote:

    > Well the zip loc veggie bags worked fine to "dry" the cooked rice in the
    > fridge.
    >
    > For me Fried Rice is a catch all with no special recipe - it's what ever I
    > seem to have on hand;
    >
    > Some or all of the following:
    >
    > Cabbage
    > Napa
    > Carrot
    > Peas
    > Celery
    > Bok Choy
    > Onion
    > Green Onion
    > Scallion
    > Mexican Onion
    > Egg
    > Meat
    > No Meat
    > Kitchen sink
    > Rice of course.
    > Sesame seeds
    > Garlic
    > Ginger
    > cauliflower
    > Broccoli
    > green beans
    >
    > Oil (vegetable not OO).
    >
    > for seasoning; (some or all)
    >
    > Rice vinegar
    > sesame oil
    > sugar
    > Soy (any kind)
    > ginger (above too)
    > molasses
    > honey
    > 5 spice
    > Kitchen cabinet.
    >
    > YOU?
    >
    > Dimitri


    Sounds pretty darn good. What is Mexican onion?

    jay

  6. #6
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    aem <[email protected]> writes:

    > Same for bean sprouts, never in the rice, almost
    > essential for the chow mein.......


    Wow! I thought I was the only one who insists on bean sprouts in my
    chow mein.

    Bean sprout-based chow mein used to be the norm. When I was a kid,
    every dish of chow mein from every Chinese restaurant I ever ate at,
    and there were many, was basically bean sprouts and other great
    veggies --water chestnuts, snow peas, onions, baby corn, etc-- dished
    over crispy fried noodles. Later, as an adult, when I moved to the
    SFBA, the largest Chinese population on the West Coast, I never saw a
    bean sprout ever again. Chow mein was now always pan fried noodles
    (basically limp greasy spaghetti) with a few (very few!) veggies mixed
    in. If I even mentioned bean sprouts, the resto ppl looked at me like
    I'd ordered bbq'd baby lips! What the Hell happened?

    I thought is was all me. One of the largest newsgroup threads I ever
    instigated was on ba.food and was about chow mein. I argued tooth and
    nail for days against an overwhelming majority who claimed chow mein
    IS ALWAYS pan fried noodles. Chow mein means noodles in Chinese, yada
    yada. I even went to old restos I knew as a kid, if they still existed.
    Nary a bean sprout in sight. I began to doubt my sanity.

    I finally found one lone restaurant, where my dad lives, that still
    serves bean sprout chow mein over crispy noodles. I am vindicated!
    One other questionable source still does that particular combination.
    Unfortunately, it's canned. Yes, Chung King! Ick.

    Now, if I want it my way with my beloved bean sprouts, I gotta make my
    own ...and I do.

    nb

  7. #7
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    On Jun 11, 11:00*am, not...@bb.nothome.com wrote:
    > aem <aem_ag...@yahoo.com> writes:
    > > Same for bean sprouts, never in the rice, almost
    > > essential for the chow mein.......

    >
    > Wow! *I thought I was the only one who insists on bean sprouts in my
    > chow mein. *
    >
    > Bean sprout-based chow mein used to be the norm. *When I was a kid,
    > every dish of chow mein from every Chinese restaurant I ever ate at,
    > and there were many, was basically bean sprouts and other great
    > veggies --water chestnuts, snow peas, onions, baby corn, etc-- dished
    > over crispy fried noodles. *Later, as an adult, when I moved to the
    > SFBA, the largest Chinese population on the West Coast, I never saw a
    > bean sprout ever again. *Chow mein was now always pan fried noodles
    > (basically limp greasy spaghetti) with a few (very few!) veggies mixed
    > in. *If I even mentioned bean sprouts, the resto ppl looked at me like
    > I'd ordered bbq'd baby lips! *What the Hell happened?
    >
    > I thought is was all me. *One of the largest newsgroup threads I ever
    > instigated was on ba.food and was about chow mein. *I argued tooth and
    > nail for days against an overwhelming majority who claimed chow mein
    > IS ALWAYS pan fried noodles. *Chow mein means noodles in Chinese, yada
    > yada. *I even went to old restos I knew as a kid, if they still existed..
    > Nary a bean sprout in sight. *I began to doubt my sanity.
    >
    > I finally found one lone restaurant, where my dad lives, that still
    > serves bean sprout chow mein over crispy noodles. *I am vindicated!
    > One other questionable source still does that particular combination.
    > Unfortunately, it's canned. *Yes, Chung King! *Ick. *
    >
    > Now, if I want it my way with my beloved bean sprouts, I gotta make my
    > own ...and I do. *
    >

    I'm not sure what you're saying. Chow mein is stirfried noodles, and
    I like bean sprouts as one of the ingredients. The noodles are still
    the thing (and they're not limp spaghetti, either). Do you mean that
    restaurants up there exclude bean sprouts from chow mein? I don't
    know what they do here in SoCal because I never order chow mein out.

    One home version, seldom seen in restaurants as far as I know, is what
    we used to call "pancake" noodles. You stir fry all your meat and
    veggie ingredients and reserve. You boil the noodles and then put
    them in a pan in hot oil and let them develop a fried consistency on
    the bottom -- a little crustiness -- then you flip them and do the
    same on the second side. Slide onto a platter, top with the stirfry.
    Cut with a knife to serve. I'm sure there is a restaurant out there
    that serves this, but I don't know what they call it. -aem

  8. #8
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice

    On Jun 11, 10:16*am, jay <jay...@cantcook.com> wrote:
    > On Thu, 11 Jun 2009 08:41:08 -0700, Dimitri wrote:
    > > Well the zip loc veggie bags worked fine to "dry" the cooked rice in the
    > > fridge.

    >
    > > For me Fried Rice is a catch all with no special recipe - it's what ever I
    > > seem to have on hand;

    >
    > > Some or all of the following:

    >
    > > Cabbage
    > > Napa
    > > Carrot
    > > Peas
    > > Celery
    > > Bok Choy
    > > Onion
    > > Green Onion
    > > Scallion
    > > Mexican Onion
    > > Egg
    > > Meat
    > > No Meat
    > > Kitchen sink
    > > Rice of course.
    > > Sesame seeds
    > > Garlic
    > > Ginger
    > > cauliflower
    > > Broccoli
    > > green beans

    >
    > > Oil (vegetable not OO).

    >
    > > for seasoning; (some or all)

    >
    > > Rice vinegar
    > > sesame oil
    > > sugar
    > > Soy (any kind)
    > > ginger (above too)
    > > molasses
    > > honey
    > > 5 spice
    > > Kitchen cabinet.

    >
    > > YOU?

    >
    > > Dimitri

    >
    > Sounds pretty darn good. *What is Mexican onion?
    >
    > jay


    it's a scallion with the white part being the size of a radish, and is
    used in the same manner a regular scallions.

    harriet & critters in azusa, ca

  9. #9
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Jun 11, 10:16 am, jay <jay...@cantcook.com> wrote:
    > On Thu, 11 Jun 2009 08:41:08 -0700, Dimitri wrote:
    > > Well the zip loc veggie bags worked fine to "dry" the cooked rice in the
    > > fridge.

    >
    > > For me Fried Rice is a catch all with no special recipe - it's what ever
    > > I
    > > seem to have on hand;

    >
    > > Some or all of the following:

    >
    > > Cabbage
    > > Napa
    > > Carrot
    > > Peas
    > > Celery
    > > Bok Choy
    > > Onion
    > > Green Onion
    > > Scallion
    > > Mexican Onion
    > > Egg
    > > Meat
    > > No Meat
    > > Kitchen sink
    > > Rice of course.
    > > Sesame seeds
    > > Garlic
    > > Ginger
    > > cauliflower
    > > Broccoli
    > > green beans

    >
    > > Oil (vegetable not OO).

    >
    > > for seasoning; (some or all)

    >
    > > Rice vinegar
    > > sesame oil
    > > sugar
    > > Soy (any kind)
    > > ginger (above too)
    > > molasses
    > > honey
    > > 5 spice
    > > Kitchen cabinet.

    >
    > > YOU?

    >
    > > Dimitri

    >
    > Sounds pretty darn good. What is Mexican onion?
    >
    > jay


    it's a scallion with the white part being the size of a radish, and is
    used in the same manner a regular scallions.

    harriet & critters in azusa, ca

    Yep - here is So CAL they are labeled Mexican onions.

    http://www.marquezproduce.net/images...ICAN_ONION.jpg

    Dimitri


  10. #10
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    [email protected] wrote:
    >Most of the time they are nothing special, just the standard soy
    >sauce, rice wine, garlic and ginger. Sometimes the other components
    >of the dish will seem to want more--could be black bean sauce, or
    >oyster sauce, or chile sauce, or even hoisin sauce. Occasionally I'll
    >have spicy bean curd on hand and I'll stir some of that in
    >(particularly if the dish will include green beans or long beans, with
    >which I think it pairs really well). I thicken them with corn starch
    >about half the time, maybe less.


    What more can you tell me about the spicy bean curd? Where do you get it, how
    does it naturally appear, how does it taste, etc.?

    Orlando

  11. #11
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    aem <[email protected]> writes:


    > I'm not sure what you're saying. Chow mein is stirfried
    > noodles.....


    Nevermind

  12. #12
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    [email protected] wrote:
    > aem <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> Same for bean sprouts, never in the rice, almost
    >> essential for the chow mein.......

    >
    > Wow! I thought I was the only one who insists on bean sprouts in my
    > chow mein.
    >
    > Bean sprout-based chow mein used to be the norm. When I was a kid,
    > every dish of chow mein from every Chinese restaurant I ever ate at,
    > and there were many, was basically bean sprouts and other great
    > veggies --water chestnuts, snow peas, onions, baby corn, etc-- dished
    > over crispy fried noodles. Later, as an adult, when I moved to the
    > SFBA, the largest Chinese population on the West Coast, I never saw a
    > bean sprout ever again. Chow mein was now always pan fried noodles
    > (basically limp greasy spaghetti) with a few (very few!) veggies mixed
    > in. If I even mentioned bean sprouts, the resto ppl looked at me like
    > I'd ordered bbq'd baby lips! What the Hell happened?
    >
    > I thought is was all me. One of the largest newsgroup threads I ever
    > instigated was on ba.food and was about chow mein. I argued tooth and
    > nail for days against an overwhelming majority who claimed chow mein
    > IS ALWAYS pan fried noodles. Chow mein means noodles in Chinese, yada
    > yada. I even went to old restos I knew as a kid, if they still existed.
    > Nary a bean sprout in sight. I began to doubt my sanity.
    >
    > I finally found one lone restaurant, where my dad lives, that still
    > serves bean sprout chow mein over crispy noodles. I am vindicated!
    > One other questionable source still does that particular combination.
    > Unfortunately, it's canned. Yes, Chung King! Ick.
    >
    > Now, if I want it my way with my beloved bean sprouts, I gotta make my
    > own ...and I do.
    >
    > nb


    This is how I recall chow mein as well - vegetables (with bean sprouts)
    over crispy noodles. I live on the east coast though and I know Chinese
    food is way different over here.

    We used to get sub gum chow mein. I think it just meant the vegetables
    were diced instead of thinly sliced. I really don't know. It's what we
    (my family) always got along with a poo-poo platter and pork fried rice.
    It was a long time before I realized that chinese food was more than
    chow mein.

    Tracy

  13. #13
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    Tracy <[email protected]> writes:


    > This is how I recall chow mein as well - vegetables (with bean
    > sprouts) over crispy noodles. I live on the east coast though and I
    > know Chinese food is way different over here.


    It's all different here, too. I know damn well that was the norm in
    CAs Central Valley back in the 50s. Also with the famous Frank Fat's
    in Sacramento as late as the early 70s. No more. Now, all those
    exotic veggies, including sprouts, are pricey as heck and what
    restaurant would serve them when they can foist off greasy ramen
    noodles to clueless youngsters at a tenth the cost.

    The only one I know of, now, is the Kowloon Chinese Restaurant in
    Visalia, CA. They even ask. "Pan fried or crispy noodles?" The
    "crispy" is all stir-fried sprouts and fresh veggies piled on top of a
    nest of crunchy noodles, just like when I was a kid. Yum!

    nb

  14. #14
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice


    >
    > > Sounds pretty darn good. What is Mexican onion?

    >
    > > jay

    >
    > it's a scallion with the white part being the size of a radish, and is
    > used in the same manner a regular scallions.
    >
    > harriet & critters in azusa, ca
    >
    > Yep - here is So CAL they are labeled Mexican onions.
    >
    > http://www.marquezproduce.net/images...ICAN_ONION.jpg
    >
    > Dimitri


    all this talk of cooking chinese at home. i believe i'll make a trip
    to one of the asian markets here in the san gabriel valley and get
    some fresh noodles. (as many asian markets as there are latino
    markets..just depends on what part of the san gabriel valley you're
    in).

    harriet & critters in azusa, ca (15 miles east of pasadena, ca)



  15. #15
    George Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Tracy <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >
    >> This is how I recall chow mein as well - vegetables (with bean
    >> sprouts) over crispy noodles. I live on the east coast though and I
    >> know Chinese food is way different over here.

    >
    > It's all different here, too. I know damn well that was the norm in
    > CAs Central Valley back in the 50s. Also with the famous Frank Fat's
    > in Sacramento as late as the early 70s. No more. Now, all those
    > exotic veggies, including sprouts, are pricey as heck and what
    > restaurant would serve them when they can foist off greasy ramen
    > noodles to clueless youngsters at a tenth the cost.


    Not sure sprouts could be called exotic or expensive. They currently go
    for ~$0.50/lb in the produce section of a number of markets I know.

    The one place they are really common is at pho restaurants. I go to a
    couple different restaurants and they always bring out a big dish of
    sprouts with some Thai basil and some sliced hot peppers.

    > The only one I know of, now, is the Kowloon Chinese Restaurant in
    > Visalia, CA. They even ask. "Pan fried or crispy noodles?" The
    > "crispy" is all stir-fried sprouts and fresh veggies piled on top of a
    > nest of crunchy noodles, just like when I was a kid. Yum!
    >
    > nb


  16. #16
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    >>
    >> > Sounds pretty darn good. What is Mexican onion?

    >>
    >> > jay

    >>
    >> it's a scallion with the white part being the size of a radish, and is
    >> used in the same manner a regular scallions.
    >>
    >> harriet & critters in azusa, ca
    >>
    >> Yep - here is So CAL they are labeled Mexican onions.
    >>
    >> http://www.marquezproduce.net/images...ICAN_ONION.jpg
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    > all this talk of cooking chinese at home. i believe i'll make a trip
    > to one of the asian markets here in the san gabriel valley and get
    > some fresh noodles. (as many asian markets as there are latino
    > markets..just depends on what part of the san gabriel valley you're
    > in).
    >
    > harriet & critters in azusa, ca (15 miles east of pasadena, ca)


    There are some unbelievable markets and restaurants in the SGV as well as
    the area below Diamond Bar at the junction of the 57 & 60.

    Damn lady I'm drooling.....

    Dimitri


  17. #17
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    On Jun 11, 11:51*am, Orlando Enrique Fiol <of...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >
    > What more can you tell me about the spicy bean curd? Where do you get it,how
    > does it naturally appear, how does it taste, etc.?
    >

    It's fermented bean curd (tofu), sometimes called bean curd cheese.
    Comes in small jars or cans in a few different forms. Fermented by
    itself, fermented with chili, or with rice wine and salt. I get the
    second form but don't happen to have any right now so I can't describe
    the jar's label for you. Ask for spicy fermented dow fu. -aem

  18. #18
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice

    Dimitri wrote:
    > Well the zip loc veggie bags worked fine to "dry" the cooked rice in
    > the fridge.
    >
    > For me Fried Rice is a catch all with no special recipe - it's what
    > ever I seem to have on hand;
    >
    > Some or all of the following:
    >
    > Cabbage
    > Napa
    > Carrot
    > Peas
    > Celery
    > Bok Choy
    > Onion
    > Green Onion
    > Scallion
    > Mexican Onion
    > Egg
    > Meat
    > No Meat
    > Kitchen sink
    > Rice of course.
    > Sesame seeds
    > Garlic
    > Ginger
    > cauliflower
    > Broccoli
    > green beans
    >
    > Oil (vegetable not OO).
    >
    > for seasoning; (some or all)
    >
    > Rice vinegar
    > sesame oil
    > sugar
    > Soy (any kind)
    > ginger (above too)
    > molasses
    > honey
    > 5 spice
    > Kitchen cabinet.
    >
    > YOU?
    >
    > Dimitri


    Day old rice, soy sauce, scallions, bean sprouts, eggs. Sometimes I add
    shrimp, pork or chicken.


    Becca

  19. #19
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice vs. chow mein

    [email protected] wrote:
    >It's fermented bean curd (tofu), sometimes called bean curd cheese.
    >Comes in small jars or cans in a few different forms. Fermented by
    >itself, fermented with chili, or with rice wine and salt. I get the
    >second form but don't happen to have any right now so I can't describe
    >the jar's label for you. Ask for spicy fermented dow fu. -aem


    I think I'd like both forms and have probably eaten it in Sechuan restaurant
    dishes without explicitly identifying it. I hear it's a Sechuan staple.

    Orlando

  20. #20
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: Fried rice

    [email protected] wrote:
    >Day old rice, soy sauce, scallions, bean sprouts, eggs. Sometimes I add
    >shrimp, pork or chicken.


    Because of South Beach, we're really getting good at doing it wirh brown rice.
    I like chiles or chile garlic paste in mine as well as a smattering of ground
    nuts, bean sprouts, leftover meat, egg, scallion, Sechuan peppercorns and other
    stuff depending on mood.

    Orlando

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