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Thread: Fried Prosciutto

  1. #1
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Fried Prosciutto

    One of the biggests wastes of TV is Martha Stewart's
    Everyday Food show. It's always the most mundane
    stuff, like Sloppy Joes, lettuce and tomato salad
    with dressing, sugar cookies, etc. It's not like
    Lidia Bastianich or Jacques Pepin where I'm being
    shown stuff I've never done or don't know how to do.
    If there's nothing else food-related on TV, I'll
    turn on Everyday Food while doing something else.

    So I was surprised when I saw something very
    interesting. One of their people made a BLT
    sandwich, but substituted fried prosciutto for
    the bacon. I'd never thought of frying prosciutto
    before. It sure looked good on TV.

    At Trader Joe's, I bought a package of a cheap
    prosciutto (Stockmeyer's, from Germany). I've
    eaten this prosciutto often, and while not the
    best, it's a very good value. You get a lot
    for your money.

    I fried two batches, one on moderate-low and
    another on moderate. They were okay, but not
    really exciting. I saved the rest of the
    prosciutto to eat in the usual way.

    However, something unexpected developed later
    in the day. I noticed an unpleasant odor.
    At first, I couldn't say what it was. I was
    thinking it might be dead animal, but it didn't
    really smell like a dead animal.

    Then, I hit on what it really smelled like.
    It smelled exactly like fried fish. The last
    fish I made was in soup a few days earlier,
    but fish soup never stinks up the kitchen.
    It's probably been 10 or 15 years since I
    fried a fish.

    Bingo! I know what it is. It's the prosciutto.
    That must be why Stockmeyer's is so cheap.
    They must be feeding fish waste (heads, tails,
    etc.) to the pigs. I've never noticed a fishy
    flavor in their prosciutto when eaten fresh
    out of the package. But frying it released
    these odors.

    That's not to say there's anything wrong with
    feeding fish waste to pigs. It might even be
    healthful because of the omega-3 fatty acids.
    And I've never noticed any off-flavors in the
    prosciutto. Still, it came as a surprise that
    such a strong and unpleasant odor would be
    released.

  2. #2
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >
    > So I was surprised when I saw something very
    > interesting. *One of their people made a BLT
    > sandwich, but substituted fried prosciutto for
    > the bacon. *I'd never thought of frying prosciutto
    > before. *It sure looked good on TV.


    I think I've seen it on Iron Chef America and Good
    Eats. I've fried prosciutto and loved it.

    > At Trader Joe's, I bought a package of a cheap
    > prosciutto (Stockmeyer's, from Germany). *I've
    > eaten this prosciutto often, and while not the
    > best, it's a very good value. *You get a lot
    > for your money.


    Every once in a while Costco carries a Canadian
    prosciutto that are sized like quarter hams. Very
    good. One thing I learned is slice them as soon as
    I buy them - I froze one whole and it wasn't easy to
    come up with a recipe that could handle a giant
    piece of cured ham like that.

  3. #3
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto


    "Mark Thorson" wrote:
    >
    > One of the biggests wastes of TV is Martha Stewart's
    > Everyday Food show. It's always the most mundane
    > stuff, like Sloppy Joes, lettuce and tomato salad
    > with dressing, sugar cookies, etc. It's not like
    > Lidia Bastianich or Jacques Pepin where I'm being
    > shown stuff I've never done or don't know how to do.
    > If there's nothing else food-related on TV, I'll
    > turn on Everyday Food while doing something else.
    >
    > So I was surprised when I saw something very
    > interesting. One of their people made a BLT
    > sandwich, but substituted fried prosciutto for
    > the bacon. I'd never thought of frying prosciutto
    > before.


    Very culinarilly ignorant... cooking prosciutto ruins it, frying destroys
    it. And prosciutto is not smoked so it can't work for a BLT. Prosciutto is
    all about texture and visual/presentation, it has no distinguishing flavor
    of it's own, it takes on the flavor of whatever it's paired, prosciutto is
    the dago tofu of ham. Perhaps

    prosciutto
    [proh-SHOO-toh]
    The Italian word for "ham," prosciutto is a term broadly used to describe a
    ham that has been seasoned, salt-cured (but not smoked) and air-dried. The
    meat is pressed, which produces a firm, dense texture. Italy's Parma ham is
    the true prosciutto, although others are also now made in the United States.
    Italian prosciuttos are designated prosciutto cotto, which is cooked, and
    prosciutto crudo, which is raw (though, because of its curing, ready to
    eat). This type of Italian ham is also labeled according to its city or
    region of origin, for example prosciutto di Parma and prosciutto di San
    Daniele. Prosciutto is available in gourmet and Italian markets and some
    supermarkets. It's usually sold in transparently thin slices. Prosciutto is
    best eaten as is and is a classic first course when served with melon or
    figs. It can also be added at the last minute to cooked foods such as pastas
    or vegetables. Prolonged cooking will toughen it.

    Perhaps pancetta will work for a BLT, cooking won't destroy it, however it's
    not smoked either... only American style bacon will work for a BLT.

    pancetta
    [pan-CHEH-tuh]
    An Italian bacon that is cured with salt and spices but not smoked.
    Flavorful, slightly salty pancetta comes in a sausagelike roll. It's used in
    Italian cooking to flavor sauces, pasta dishes, forcemeats, vegetables and
    meats. Pancetta can be tightly wrapped and refrigerated for up to 3 weeks,
    or frozen up to 6 months.



    © Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD
    LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.





  4. #4
    George Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > One of the biggests wastes of TV is Martha Stewart's
    > Everyday Food show. It's always the most mundane
    > stuff, like Sloppy Joes, lettuce and tomato salad
    > with dressing, sugar cookies, etc. It's not like
    > Lidia Bastianich or Jacques Pepin where I'm being
    > shown stuff I've never done or don't know how to do.
    > If there's nothing else food-related on TV, I'll
    > turn on Everyday Food while doing something else.


    Maybe, but have you considered the population that think you need
    "sloppy joe mix"? If it gives anyone a start it isn't so bad.

    >
    > So I was surprised when I saw something very
    > interesting. One of their people made a BLT
    > sandwich, but substituted fried prosciutto for
    > the bacon. I'd never thought of frying prosciutto
    > before. It sure looked good on TV.
    >
    > At Trader Joe's, I bought a package of a cheap
    > prosciutto (Stockmeyer's, from Germany). I've
    > eaten this prosciutto often, and while not the
    > best, it's a very good value. You get a lot
    > for your money.
    >
    > I fried two batches, one on moderate-low and
    > another on moderate. They were okay, but not
    > really exciting. I saved the rest of the
    > prosciutto to eat in the usual way.
    >
    > However, something unexpected developed later
    > in the day. I noticed an unpleasant odor.
    > At first, I couldn't say what it was. I was
    > thinking it might be dead animal, but it didn't
    > really smell like a dead animal.
    >
    > Then, I hit on what it really smelled like.
    > It smelled exactly like fried fish. The last
    > fish I made was in soup a few days earlier,
    > but fish soup never stinks up the kitchen.
    > It's probably been 10 or 15 years since I
    > fried a fish.
    >
    > Bingo! I know what it is. It's the prosciutto.
    > That must be why Stockmeyer's is so cheap.
    > They must be feeding fish waste (heads, tails,
    > etc.) to the pigs. I've never noticed a fishy
    > flavor in their prosciutto when eaten fresh
    > out of the package. But frying it released
    > these odors.
    >
    > That's not to say there's anything wrong with
    > feeding fish waste to pigs. It might even be
    > healthful because of the omega-3 fatty acids.
    > And I've never noticed any off-flavors in the
    > prosciutto. Still, it came as a surprise that
    > such a strong and unpleasant odor would be
    > released.


  5. #5
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    On Thu, 23 Jul 2009 13:04:25 -0700, Mark Thorson wrote:

    > So I was surprised when I saw something very
    > interesting. One of their people made a BLT
    > sandwich, but substituted fried prosciutto for
    > the bacon. I'd never thought of frying prosciutto
    > before. It sure looked good on TV.


    Proscuitto wrapped around asparagus and sautéed in a little EVOO.
    It really concentrates the salt, though.

    > Bingo! I know what it is. It's the prosciutto.
    > That must be why Stockmeyer's is so cheap.
    > They must be feeding fish waste (heads, tails,
    > etc.) to the pigs. I've never noticed a fishy
    > flavor in their prosciutto when eaten fresh
    > out of the package. But frying it released
    > these odors.


    I've heard about the practice before, but this is all I can find on
    the subject right now. Please forgive me that it's from an
    Australian newspaper.

    -sw

  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    On Thu, 23 Jul 2009 21:09:40 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > I've heard about the practice before, but this is all I can find on
    > the subject right now. Please forgive me that it's from an
    > Australian newspaper.


    [http://www.canberratimes.com.au/news.../1342227.aspx]

    ObFood: I'm downloading Pee Wee's Big Adventure. Remember the
    opening scene? (I think I do).

    -sw

  7. #7
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    On Thu, 23 Jul 2009 13:04:25 -0700, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:

    >One of the biggests wastes of TV is Martha Stewart's
    >Everyday Food show.


    <snippidy>

    I've never been a fan of MS, esp. her cooking. When she first
    published _Entertaining_ years and years ago, my SIL gave me a copy
    and I tried maybe a dozen recipes before I decided the woman is long
    on appearance and short on edibility. More than one dish had me
    scratching my head wondering if she'd actually *tried* the recipe or
    just thought it *read* well and would look pretty. One that I recall -
    and, mind you, I was a fairly inexperienced cook at the time - was an
    appetizer of cherry tomatoes with the pulp scooped out and replaced
    with a cream cheese mixture, topped with red or black caviar. Tasted
    awful and, after about 15 mins., looked worse, as the caviar bled into
    the cream cheese. My then-four-year-old daughter said they looked like
    "monster eyeballs."

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    - Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"





  8. #8
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    On Thu, 23 Jul 2009 20:13:52 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 23 Jul 2009 13:04:25 -0700, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    >fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:
    >
    >>One of the biggests wastes of TV is Martha Stewart's
    >>Everyday Food show.

    >
    ><snippidy>
    >
    >I've never been a fan of MS, esp. her cooking. When she first
    >published _Entertaining_ years and years ago, my SIL gave me a copy
    >and I tried maybe a dozen recipes before I decided the woman is long
    >on appearance and short on edibility. More than one dish had me
    >scratching my head wondering if she'd actually *tried* the recipe or
    >just thought it *read* well and would look pretty. One that I recall -
    >and, mind you, I was a fairly inexperienced cook at the time - was an
    >appetizer of cherry tomatoes with the pulp scooped out and replaced
    >with a cream cheese mixture, topped with red or black caviar. Tasted
    >awful and, after about 15 mins., looked worse, as the caviar bled into
    >the cream cheese. My then-four-year-old daughter said they looked like
    >"monster eyeballs."


    Martha Stewart and her recipes are totally useless. I have a friend
    who runs an upscale nail salon. I stopped in and witnessed a Martha
    bash. They all liked looking at the pictures but not one of the dozen
    women would ever use any of her recipes ever again. The consensus was
    "they never work."

    Emeril gets bashed here big time but at least his recipes produce
    edible food for the everyday cook. I've learned enough over the years
    that I use recipes mainly for inspiration. I find nothing inspiring
    about MS recipes.

    Lou

  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    Lou wrote:

    > Martha Stewart and her recipes are totally useless. I have a friend
    > who runs an upscale nail salon. I stopped in and witnessed a Martha
    > bash. They all liked looking at the pictures but not one of the dozen
    > women would ever use any of her recipes ever again. The consensus was
    > "they never work."


    I use her recipe for turkey gravy; it's always worked perfectly for me.

    Bob




  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    On Fri, 24 Jul 2009 00:04:32 -0500, Lou Decruss
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have a friend
    >who runs an upscale nail salon. I stopped in and witnessed a Martha
    >bash. They all liked looking at the pictures but not one of the dozen
    >women would ever use any of her recipes ever again. The consensus was
    >"they never work."


    I can't say I've actually tried a "Martha" recipe, but they've
    certainly inspired me. I think that's the general idea.... prod
    readers to do something, anything - just do it! I can't fault "them"
    for that concept.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  11. #11
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto


    "Mark Thorson" ha scritto nel messaggio


    > At Trader Joe's, I bought a package of a cheap
    > prosciutto (Stockmeyer's, from Germany). I've
    > eaten this prosciutto often, and while not the
    > best, it's a very good value. You get a lot
    > for your money.


    You get crap for your money. Don't fry prosciutto crudo. The only reason
    to ever do that is to flavor some oil you will use to make something. There
    is nothing in the nature of prosciutto crudo that lends itself to frying.
    It turns boardy and fibrous if cooked in oil and turns back to pork if
    boiled.

    Each proscoitto crudo from various regions has its own flavor. My favorites
    are San Daniele from Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Parma from you know where.
    They are less salty. Anyone who thinks prosciutto crudo needs to be cooked
    should stop cooking-- including Martha-- and anyone who thinks it has no
    distinctive flavor of its own has just signed his own certificate of TIAD.



  12. #12
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto


    "Terry Pulliam Burd"ha scritto nel messaggio
    One that I recall -> and, mind you, I was a fairly inexperienced cook at the
    time - was an
    > appetizer of cherry tomatoes with the pulp scooped out and replaced with a
    > cream cheese mixture, topped with red or black caviar. Tasted> awful and,
    > after about 15 mins., looked worse, as the caviar bled into> the cream
    > cheese. My then-four-year-old daughter said they looked like> "monster
    > eyeballs."
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    I like your kid.



  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    On Fri, 24 Jul 2009 10:10:44 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Anyone who thinks prosciutto crudo needs to be cooked
    >should stop cooking-- including Martha-- and anyone who thinks it has no
    >distinctive flavor of its own has just signed his own certificate of TIAD.


    OMG... where does that put those of us who have never heard of it?

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  14. #14
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto


    "sf" ha scritto nel messaggio >
    "Giusi" > wrote:
    >
    >>Anyone who thinks prosciutto crudo needs to be cooked >>should stop
    >>cooking-- including Martha-- and anyone who thinks it has no >>distinctive
    >>flavor of its own has just signed his own certificate of TIAD.

    >
    > OMG... where does that put those of us who have never heard of it?


    On parole until you figure out that what you call prosciutto is actually
    prosciutto crudo. Prosciutto cotto is what one calls ham in the US. Now ya
    gottit? I wish I had some at the moment.



  15. #15
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    brooklyn1 wrote:

    > Very culinarilly ignorant... cooking prosciutto ruins it, frying
    > destroys it. And prosciutto is not smoked so it can't work for a
    > BLT. Prosciutto is all about texture and visual/presentation, it has
    > no distinguishing flavor of it's own, it takes on the flavor of
    > whatever it's paired, prosciutto is the dago tofu of ham. Perhaps


    Instead of buying crap-ham and then whine, fork out the money for a good
    one. You're right, anyway, about frying prosciutto: it's nonsense, ruins it
    and makes it way too salty.
    --
    Vilco
    Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
    qualcosa da bere a portata di mano




  16. #16
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Each proscoitto crudo from various regions has its own flavor. My favorites
    > are San Daniele from Friuli-Venezia Giulia and Parma from you know where.
    > They are less salty.


    Ever tried culatello (di Zibello)? It can be sublime (and mighty
    expensive). See
    <http://www.consorziodelculatellodizibello.it/ita/consorzio.html>

    Victor

  17. #17
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto


    "Twilly Turkey" wrote:
    > Lou wrote:
    >
    >> Martha Stewart and her recipes are totally useless. I have a friend
    >> who runs an upscale nail salon. I stopped in and witnessed a Martha
    >> bash. They all liked looking at the pictures but not one of the dozen
    >> women would ever use any of her recipes ever again. The consensus was
    >> "they never work."

    >
    > I use her recipe for turkey gravy; it's always worked perfectly for me.
    >
    > Boob
    >


    What would one expect, you're a turkey! LOL




  18. #18
    John Kane Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    On Jul 23, 5:51*pm, George <geo...@nospam.invalid> wrote:
    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    > > One of the biggests wastes of TV is Martha Stewart's
    > > Everyday Food show. *It's always the most mundane
    > > stuff, like Sloppy Joes, lettuce and tomato salad
    > > with dressing, sugar cookies, etc. *It's not like
    > > Lidia Bastianich or Jacques Pepin where I'm being
    > > shown stuff I've never done or don't know how to do.
    > > If there's nothing else food-related on TV, I'll
    > > turn on Everyday Food while doing something else.

    >
    > Maybe, but have you considered the population that think you need
    > "sloppy joe mix"? If it gives anyone a start it isn't so bad.
    >


    A friend of mine taught an nightschool "intro to cooking" course at
    community college and started with how to crack an egg.

    John Kane, Kingston ON Canada

  19. #19
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto


    "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Pwgam.42369$[email protected]..
    > brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >> Very culinarilly ignorant... cooking prosciutto ruins it, frying
    >> destroys it. And prosciutto is not smoked so it can't work for a
    >> BLT. Prosciutto is all about texture and visual/presentation, it has
    >> no distinguishing flavor of it's own, it takes on the flavor of
    >> whatever it's paired, prosciutto is the dago tofu of ham.

    >
    > Instead of buying crap-ham and then whine, fork out the money for a good
    > one.


    I do buy good ham, but I don't buy prosciutto, I don't like it and it's
    certainly not worth the big bucks. I'm not a big fan of cured ham anyway,
    for my money cured ham is a waste of fresh ham... it came about because
    folks had a glut of pork but had no refrigeration, and was far less labor
    intensive than preparing fermented sausage. When I'm in the mood for cured
    meat I'd much rather something that also tastes good, like a fine Genoa
    salami, a sopressata, a mortadella, even a good tube steak is a better
    choice than prosciutto, at least tube steak is smoked... I'd much rather
    spend $7/lb on quality natural casing tube steak then $20/lb on prosciutto
    that's really just a form of decorative salt and fat. Italy is noted for
    some fine cured meats but prosciutto is not one. I spend a lot of money on
    quality cold cuts but cured ham is not one of my favorites, and I don't buy
    prosciutto... I think Spam is a much better choice, it's tastier, makes a
    good sandwich, can be cooked, and used in many recipes... prosciutto is
    really like wrapping paper, makes simple foods look nice, and adds calories
    is all.

    > You're right, anyway, about frying prosciutto: it's nonsense, ruins it and
    > makes it way too salty.
    >
    >

    I don't care that proscuittos have pedigrees and fancy schmancy labels and
    packaging, they are all no more tasty than chewing salt pork. I've been to
    affairs where proscuito is served wrapped around melon and asparagus, I peel
    it off and leave it behind... to me it's as an inedible garnish as the wax
    on cheese. Uncooked bacon is a better choice, at least it's smoked, and
    slab bacon can be sliced just as thin




  20. #20
    TammyM Guest

    Default Re: Fried Prosciutto

    Lou Decruss wrote:

    > Stewart and her recipes are totally useless. I have a friend
    > who runs an upscale nail salon. I stopped in and witnessed a Martha
    > bash. They all liked looking at the pictures but not one of the dozen
    > women would ever use any of her recipes ever again. The consensus was
    > "they never work."
    >
    > Emeril gets bashed here big time but at least his recipes produce
    > edible food for the everyday cook. I've learned enough over the years
    > that I use recipes mainly for inspiration. I find nothing inspiring
    > about MS recipes.


    Martha bashing has become de riguer, or seems to me anyway. Having said
    that, I do have one of her cookbooks and in its case, at least, Lou's
    first sentence is spot on. It's one I'm going to give away, maybe
    someone else can find something redeeming and/or useful in it.

    I've watched a few episodes of Everyday Cooking and find it to be useful
    at times. And there are many folks, myself included at times, who need
    the KISS of shows like this. What's the harm? I'd far rather watch EC
    than most anything on Food Network.

    TammyM

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