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Thread: Fresh olives

  1. #1
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Fresh olives

    Yesterday in the produce aisle I was staring at these little green
    round 'berries' and looking for a sign that said what they were
    because I'd never seen anything quite like them before.

    A 'helpful clerk' came by and asked if he could help.
    "What are these green things. . . and how much are they?"
    "Why? Do you want to buy some?
    "I don't know. Maybe if 'I've ever heard of them I might."

    "I think they are chick. . . chin. . . some kind of pea."
    The look on my face made him shout down to the other end of the
    aisle-- "What are these little green things? Chick-a-somethings?"
    The older man at the other end shouted back "Olives"

    The older lady walking by looked at us like we had three heads between
    us-- "You 2 don't know what a raw olive looks like?"

    I confessed that I didn't and asked what one would do with them.
    "Well, you crack them, brine them, and eat them."

    I asked if they could be prepared as fresh olives somehow and she said
    no- they are too bitter.

    I doubt these were local as I'm in NY-- and I've never noticed any in
    a grocery store before.

    They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't interested
    in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect fruit--- Should
    I be? Or should I run back there and buy some to do something
    special with?

    Jim

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 07:32:44 -0500, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't interested
    > in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect fruit--- Should
    > I be? Or should I run back there and buy some to do something
    > special with?


    I love the olives that are a greenish-tan, tannish-green with brown
    freckling. Not sure if I'd want to cure them on my own, but I'm happy
    enough to buy them.

    --

    Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

  3. #3
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On 11/20/2011 10:12 AM, sf wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 07:32:44 -0500, Jim Elbrecht<[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't interested
    >> in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect fruit--- Should
    >> I be? Or should I run back there and buy some to do something
    >> special with?

    >
    > I love the olives that are a greenish-tan, tannish-green with brown
    > freckling. Not sure if I'd want to cure them on my own, but I'm happy
    > enough to buy them.
    >

    What do you do with fresh olives. I've seen Hispanic people buying them.

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    Jim Elbrecht wrote:
    >
    > They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't interested
    > in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect fruit--- Should
    > I be? Or should I run back there and buy some to do something
    > special with?


    No, and no. Fresh olives are far too bitter to be
    used for anything. Read up on olive curing if you're
    tempted. I can't imagine selling them fresh, except
    for a few one-time purchases from people who don't
    know anything about fresh olives.

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:36:27 -0500, James Silverton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 11/20/2011 10:12 AM, sf wrote:
    > > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 07:32:44 -0500, Jim Elbrecht<[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't interested
    > >> in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect fruit--- Should
    > >> I be? Or should I run back there and buy some to do something
    > >> special with?

    > >
    > > I love the olives that are a greenish-tan, tannish-green with brown
    > > freckling. Not sure if I'd want to cure them on my own, but I'm happy
    > > enough to buy them.
    > >

    > What do you do with fresh olives. I've seen Hispanic people buying them.


    I'm no help. Your guess is as good as mine. Hubby hates olives, so I
    don't cook with them very often. Arroz Valenciana is made with
    olives, but I've never had it when the olives were cured at home.

    --

    Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

  6. #6
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:36:27 -0500, James Silverton wrote:
    >
    > > On 11/20/2011 10:12 AM, sf wrote:
    > >> On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 07:32:44 -0500, Jim Elbrecht<[email protected]>
    > >> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't interested
    > >>> in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect fruit--- Should
    > >>> I be? Or should I run back there and buy some to do something
    > >>> special with?
    > >>
    > >> I love the olives that are a greenish-tan, tannish-green with brown
    > >> freckling. Not sure if I'd want to cure them on my own, but I'm happy
    > >> enough to buy them.
    > >>

    > > What do you do with fresh olives. I've seen Hispanic people buying them.

    >
    > I think SF is talking about canned olives. Graber olives to be exact.
    > Then again, normal people do not eat fresh olives. So maybe Mrs
    > Llorente DOES eat fresh olives.
    >
    > Or more likely, she doesn't have a clue that were referring to fresh
    > olives.


    There are a few varieties of olives that are okay to eat fresh. I
    wouldn't expect to find them in California, though, unless imported from
    the Middle East at huge expense.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  7. #7
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    Miche wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:36:27 -0500, James Silverton wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 11/20/2011 10:12 AM, sf wrote:
    >>>> On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 07:32:44 -0500, Jim
    >>>> Elbrecht<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't
    >>>>> interested in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect
    >>>>> fruit--- Should I be? Or should I run back there and buy
    >>>>> some to do something special with?
    >>>>
    >>>> I love the olives that are a greenish-tan, tannish-green with brown
    >>>> freckling. Not sure if I'd want to cure them on my own, but I'm
    >>>> happy enough to buy them.
    >>>>
    >>> What do you do with fresh olives. I've seen Hispanic people buying
    >>> them.

    >>
    >> I think SF is talking about canned olives. Graber olives to be
    >> exact. Then again, normal people do not eat fresh olives. So maybe
    >> Mrs Llorente DOES eat fresh olives.
    >>
    >> Or more likely, she doesn't have a clue that were referring to fresh
    >> olives.

    >
    > There are a few varieties of olives that are okay to eat fresh. I
    > wouldn't expect to find them in California, though, unless imported
    > from the Middle East at huge expense.


    You can get raw olives here. I bought some once but then was afraid to eat
    them because they arrived in a jar that was leaking. The lid wasn't on
    tightly. I mail ordered them. I don't know of any stores in this area that
    sell raw ones. Maybe in Seattle.



  8. #8
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives


    "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    James Silverton
    > <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> What do you do with fresh olives. I've seen Hispanic people buying them.

    >
    > I'm no help. Your guess is as good as mine.


    You cure them. Inbrine or in salt, both methods work, but I don't have
    extra space so I do brine. You cover them in a strong brine, changing it
    every few days util they no longer taste bitter. You can add things like
    slivers of orange peel, lemon peel, whole spices, etc.,, but the main thing
    is to get the bitterness out. They are absolutely inedible right off the
    tree. This works for green, partly ripe or ripe ones.

    The dry method requires layering them with coarse salt and paper, changing
    it all on a regular basis.



  9. #9
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On 11/21/2011 2:28 AM, Miche wrote:

    > Sqwertz<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:36:27 -0500, James Silverton wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 11/20/2011 10:12 AM, sf wrote:


    >>>> I love the olives that are a greenish-tan, tannish-green with brown
    >>>> freckling. Not sure if I'd want to cure them on my own, but I'm happy
    >>>> enough to buy them.
    >>>>
    >>> What do you do with fresh olives. I've seen Hispanic people buying them.

    >>
    >> I think SF is talking about canned olives. Graber olives to be exact.
    >> Then again, normal people do not eat fresh olives. So maybe Mrs
    >> Llorente DOES eat fresh olives.


    > There are a few varieties of olives that are okay to eat fresh. I
    > wouldn't expect to find them in California, though, unless imported from
    > the Middle East at huge expense.


    (apologies if my snipping is bad)

    Last week I was at a produce market and saw something I'd never
    seen before. Fresh olives. I live on the opposite coast from
    California. I was curious what to do with them, too.

    nancy

  10. #10
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On 11/21/2011 4:09 AM, Giusi wrote:
    > "sf"<[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > James Silverton
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >>> What do you do with fresh olives. I've seen Hispanic people buying them.

    >>
    >> I'm no help. Your guess is as good as mine.

    >
    > You cure them. Inbrine or in salt, both methods work, but I don't have
    > extra space so I do brine. You cover them in a strong brine, changing it
    > every few days util they no longer taste bitter. You can add things like
    > slivers of orange peel, lemon peel, whole spices, etc.,, but the main thing
    > is to get the bitterness out. They are absolutely inedible right off the
    > tree. This works for green, partly ripe or ripe ones.
    >
    > The dry method requires layering them with coarse salt and paper, changing
    > it all on a regular basis.
    >
    >

    Thanks! People actually do cure their own, then. I can't see myself
    doing that since I don't eat enough olives for buying prepared ones to
    be a serious financial drain :-)

    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  11. #11
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On 11/21/2011 2:28 AM, Miche wrote:

    > Sqwertz<[email protected]> wrote:


    >>> On 11/20/2011 10:12 AM, sf wrote:


    >>>> I love the olives that are a greenish-tan, tannish-green with brown
    >>>> freckling. Not sure if I'd want to cure them on my own, but I'm happy
    >>>> enough to buy them.
    >>>>
    >>> What do you do with fresh olives. I've seen Hispanic people buying them.

    >>
    >> I think SF is talking about canned olives. Graber olives to be exact.
    >> Then again, normal people do not eat fresh olives. So maybe Mrs
    >> Llorente DOES eat fresh olives.
    >>
    >> Or more likely, she doesn't have a clue that were referring to fresh
    >> olives.

    >
    > There are a few varieties of olives that are okay to eat fresh. I
    > wouldn't expect to find them in California, though, unless imported from
    > the Middle East at huge expense.


    This might be a double post. My newsserver has been acting up.

    At the produce market last week, I saw fresh olives there for the first
    time. I wasn't sure what to do with them, so I didn't buy any. Maybe
    next time. I'm on the opposite coast from sf in the US.

    nancy


  12. #12
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ez6f2fd35ukq$.[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 23:55:37 -0800, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> You can get raw olives here. I bought some once but then was afraid to
    >> eat
    >> them because they arrived in a jar that was leaking. The lid wasn't on
    >> tightly. I mail ordered them. I don't know of any stores in this area
    >> that
    >> sell raw ones. Maybe in Seattle.

    >
    > Bottled raw olives are an oxymoron of sorts. Most things that are
    > bottled are also pasteurized to be safe. Unless the bottle was just a
    > storage container for shipping, in which case a simple plastic bag or
    > small box would be better. And if it was "leaking" then that implies
    > liquid. There would be no reason to add liquid to a fresh "bottle" of
    > olives for shipping. Which implies that they were
    > processed/pasteurized.
    >
    > And assuming they really were fresh, and packed in a bottle, in
    > liquid, and that liquid was leaking, there would be no reason to
    > reject them since the water was just "packing material" of sorts -
    > sort of like a leaky ice bag for your fresh fish. And that doesn't
    > make any sense.
    >
    > All those things considered with nothing adding up logically, I
    > really doubt those were "fresh" olives. They were processed and
    > bottled.


    They claimed not to be pasteurized. But I really don't know for sure. Many
    foods claiming to be raw really are not.



  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 18:14:53 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 15:36:27 -0500, James Silverton wrote:
    >
    > > On 11/20/2011 10:12 AM, sf wrote:
    > >> On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 07:32:44 -0500, Jim Elbrecht<[email protected]>
    > >> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't interested
    > >>> in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect fruit--- Should
    > >>> I be? Or should I run back there and buy some to do something
    > >>> special with?
    > >>
    > >> I love the olives that are a greenish-tan, tannish-green with brown
    > >> freckling. Not sure if I'd want to cure them on my own, but I'm happy
    > >> enough to buy them.
    > >>

    > > What do you do with fresh olives. I've seen Hispanic people buying them.

    >
    > I think SF is talking about canned olives. Graber olives to be exact.
    > Then again, normal people do not eat fresh olives. So maybe Mrs
    > Llorente DOES eat fresh olives.
    >
    > Or more likely, she doesn't have a clue that were referring to fresh
    > olives.
    >


    Your reading comprehension was thoroughly muddled by the booze you
    were guzzling when you wrote that one.

    --

    Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On Mon, 21 Nov 2011 08:24:02 -0500, Nancy Young <replyto@inemail>
    wrote:

    > At the produce market last week, I saw fresh olives there for the first
    > time. I wasn't sure what to do with them, so I didn't buy any. Maybe
    > next time. I'm on the opposite coast from sf in the US.


    I know what olives look like on the tree. I used to have two olive
    trees in my yard, but I removed them. My initial comment was that I
    wouldn't want to brine (or cure) them, I'll stick to the olive bar.

    Steve is a drunken asshole, nothing less and his rantings are pure
    poppycock (made up bull**** for those who don't know what poppycock
    is). Why anyone still bothers with him or Sheldon is beyond me.

    --

    Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

  15. #15
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    > No, and no. Fresh olives are far too bitter to be
    > used for anything. Read up on olive curing if you're
    > tempted.


    I've read several methods. I like canning but I'll pass on curing
    olives.

    > I can't imagine selling them fresh, except
    > for a few one-time purchases from people who don't
    > know anything about fresh olives.


    As fresh olives are so bitter some cultures have considered them toxic I
    wonder why any store would carry them. Very much a specialty product.

  16. #16
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    In article <jae9gi$bdm$[email protected]>,
    Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    > >
    > > No, and no. Fresh olives are far too bitter to be
    > > used for anything. Read up on olive curing if you're
    > > tempted.

    >
    > I've read several methods. I like canning but I'll pass on curing
    > olives.
    >
    > > I can't imagine selling them fresh, except
    > > for a few one-time purchases from people who don't
    > > know anything about fresh olives.

    >
    > As fresh olives are so bitter some cultures have considered them toxic I
    > wonder why any store would carry them. Very much a specialty product.


    For people who want to cure their own.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  17. #17
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >
    > As fresh olives are so bitter some cultures have considered them toxic I
    > wonder why any store would carry them. Very much a specialty product.


    Maybe some people are using them as a folk medicine.

  18. #18
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 07:32:44 -0500, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Yesterday in the produce aisle I was staring at these little green
    >round 'berries' and looking for a sign that said what they were
    >because I'd never seen anything quite like them before.
    >
    >A 'helpful clerk' came by and asked if he could help.
    >"What are these green things. . . and how much are they?"
    >"Why? Do you want to buy some?
    >"I don't know. Maybe if 'I've ever heard of them I might."
    >
    >"I think they are chick. . . chin. . . some kind of pea."
    >The look on my face made him shout down to the other end of the
    >aisle-- "What are these little green things? Chick-a-somethings?"
    >The older man at the other end shouted back "Olives"
    >
    >The older lady walking by looked at us like we had three heads between
    >us-- "You 2 don't know what a raw olive looks like?"
    >
    >I confessed that I didn't and asked what one would do with them.
    >"Well, you crack them, brine them, and eat them."
    >
    >I asked if they could be prepared as fresh olives somehow and she said
    >no- they are too bitter.
    >
    >I doubt these were local as I'm in NY-- and I've never noticed any in
    >a grocery store before.
    >
    >They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't interested
    >in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect fruit--- Should
    >I be? Or should I run back there and buy some to do something
    >special with?
    >
    >Jim


    I just saw a re-run (11/22/11) of an Alton Brown episode on olives. He
    covers the raw, fresh olives, what makes them bitter, how they are
    processed and then goes on to give several olive recipes. You might
    want to watch for the show on your station or go to Food Network.com
    and pick up the episode script.
    Janet US

  19. #19
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On Nov 20, 4:32*am, Jim Elbrecht <elbre...@email.com> wrote:
    > Yesterday in the produce aisle I was staring at these little green
    > round 'berries' and looking for a sign that said what they were
    > because I'd never seen anything quite like them before.
    >
    > A 'helpful clerk' came by and asked if he could help.
    > "What are these green things. . . *and how much are they?"
    > "Why? * Do you want to buy some?
    > "I don't know. *Maybe if 'I've ever heard of them I might."
    >
    > "I think they are chick. . . chin. . . *some kind of pea."
    > The look on my face made him shout down to the other end of the
    > aisle-- "What are these little green things? * *Chick-a-somethings?"
    > The older man at the other end shouted back "Olives"
    >
    > The older lady walking by looked at us like we had three heads between
    > us-- *"You 2 don't know what a raw olive looks like?"
    >
    > I confessed that I didn't and asked what one would do with them.
    > "Well, you crack them, brine them, and eat them."
    >
    > I asked if they could be prepared as fresh olives somehow and she said
    > no- they are too bitter.
    >
    > I doubt these were local as I'm in NY-- and I've never noticed any in
    > a grocery store before.
    >
    > They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't interested
    > in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect fruit--- Should
    > I be? * * *Or should I run back there and buy some to do something
    > special with?
    >
    > Jim


    I've done them before. You need to whack them in order to crack them
    open a bit, and then they are brined for 4 or 5 weeks, changing the
    brine daily at first. If you want exact directions, let me know and I
    will post them.

  20. #20
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Fresh olives

    On Nov 20, 7:32*am, Jim Elbrecht <elbre...@email.com> wrote:
    > Yesterday in the produce aisle I was staring at these little green
    > round 'berries' and looking for a sign that said what they were
    > because I'd never seen anything quite like them before.
    >
    > A 'helpful clerk' came by and asked if he could help.
    > "What are these green things. . . *and how much are they?"
    > "Why? * Do you want to buy some?
    > "I don't know. *Maybe if 'I've ever heard of them I might."
    >
    > "I think they are chick. . . chin. . . *some kind of pea."
    > The look on my face made him shout down to the other end of the
    > aisle-- "What are these little green things? * *Chick-a-somethings?"
    > The older man at the other end shouted back "Olives"
    >
    > The older lady walking by looked at us like we had three heads between
    > us-- *"You 2 don't know what a raw olive looks like?"
    >
    > I confessed that I didn't and asked what one would do with them.
    > "Well, you crack them, brine them, and eat them."
    >
    > I asked if they could be prepared as fresh olives somehow and she said
    > no- they are too bitter.
    >
    > I doubt these were local as I'm in NY-- and I've never noticed any in
    > a grocery store before.
    >
    > They had a fair amount of spots and blemishes so I wasn't interested
    > in spending a bunch of time brining less than perfect fruit--- Should
    > I be? * * *Or should I run back there and buy some to do something
    > special with?
    >
    > Jim


    I think I'd pass em by. One less thing to worry over doin' em right.
    KISS.

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