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Thread: Fresh horseradish

  1. #1
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Fresh horseradish

    I dug the horseradish from the garden yesterday for the first time.
    Today I peeled and ground one of the roots. I have never eaten
    fresh horseradish before, just prepared horseradish from the little
    jars at the store. I knew to take the blender outside, although now
    I'm not sure that was necessary. I had to add some water to get it
    to grind, then after it was done I waited a few minutes. I took a
    big spoonful out and stirred it into some ketchup to try with some
    krab, and I mixed a little white vinegar in with the rest and packed
    it into canning jars.

    The fresh stuff is deceptive. It doesn't smell all that strong.
    It's kind of sweet and has no bitterness to it at all. Then a few
    milliseconds later it attacks your soft palate and sinuses.
    <snort> Hoo-wee! <choke>.

    From just one root I filled a widemouth pint jar and a little jelly
    jar. It wasn't nearly the biggest, and I've got about 6 or 7 more
    to go. Think I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and
    freeze the big ones in big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.

    Bob

  2. #2
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    > to go. Think I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and
    > freeze the big ones in big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.


    Are you trying to breed a smaller horseradish plant?

  3. #3
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >> to go. Think I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and
    >> freeze the big ones in big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.

    >
    > Are you trying to breed a smaller horseradish plant?



    That's a good point. No, these are the smallest roots broken off
    from the same plants.

    Bob

  4. #4
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    In article <[email protected]>,
    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I dug the horseradish from the garden yesterday for the first time.
    > Today I peeled and ground one of the roots. I have never eaten
    > fresh horseradish before, just prepared horseradish from the little
    > jars at the store. I knew to take the blender outside, although now
    > I'm not sure that was necessary. I had to add some water to get it
    > to grind, then after it was done I waited a few minutes. I took a
    > big spoonful out and stirred it into some ketchup to try with some
    > krab, and I mixed a little white vinegar in with the rest and packed
    > it into canning jars.
    >
    > The fresh stuff is deceptive. It doesn't smell all that strong.
    > It's kind of sweet and has no bitterness to it at all. Then a few
    > milliseconds later it attacks your soft palate and sinuses.
    > <snort> Hoo-wee! <choke>.
    >
    > From just one root I filled a widemouth pint jar and a little jelly
    > jar. It wasn't nearly the biggest, and I've got about 6 or 7 more
    > to go. Think I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and
    > freeze the big ones in big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.


    I've never tried the fresh, but I found this description fascinating:

    http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Armo_rus.html

    The local store seems to always have it for sale, at US$9.99 a pound. I
    weighed a small one, and it was about a tenth of a pound, so pretty
    reasonable.

    My mother always talked about growing it in their home garden when she
    was a kid.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  5. #5
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish


    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I dug the horseradish from the garden yesterday for the first time. Today
    > I peeled and ground one of the roots. I have never eaten fresh
    > horseradish before, just prepared horseradish from the little jars at the
    > store. I knew to take the blender outside, although now I'm not sure that
    > was necessary.

    snipped
    >
    > From just one root I filled a widemouth pint jar and a little jelly jar.
    > It wasn't nearly the biggest, and I've got about 6 or 7 more to go. Think
    > I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and freeze the big ones in
    > big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.
    >
    > Bob


    It can be quite the experience. In a blender with a cover you may have been
    safe. A grinder that can spew stuff into the air can get you though.
    Sounds like you have enough to last the year alreadyin the garden.


  6. #6
    piedmont Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    On 4/4/2010 5:09 PM, zxcvbob wrote:
    > I dug the horseradish from the garden yesterday for the first time.
    > Today I peeled and ground one of the roots. I have never eaten fresh
    > horseradish before, just prepared horseradish from the little jars at
    > the store. I knew to take the blender outside, although now I'm not sure
    > that was necessary. I had to add some water to get it to grind, then
    > after it was done I waited a few minutes. I took a big spoonful out and
    > stirred it into some ketchup to try with some krab, and I mixed a little
    > white vinegar in with the rest and packed it into canning jars.
    >
    > The fresh stuff is deceptive. It doesn't smell all that strong. It's
    > kind of sweet and has no bitterness to it at all. Then a few
    > milliseconds later it attacks your soft palate and sinuses.
    > <snort> Hoo-wee! <choke>.
    >
    > From just one root I filled a widemouth pint jar and a little jelly
    > jar. It wasn't nearly the biggest, and I've got about 6 or 7 more to go.
    > Think I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and freeze the big
    > ones in big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.
    >
    > Bob

    Might have to try my hand at growing some myself!

    --
    regards, mike
    piedmont, The Practical BBQ'r
    http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/
    (mawil55)

  7. #7
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish


    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I dug the horseradish from the garden yesterday for the first time. Today I
    >peeled and ground one of the roots. I have never eaten fresh horseradish
    >before, just prepared horseradish from the little jars at the store. I
    >knew to take the blender outside, although now I'm not sure that was
    >necessary. I had to add some water to get it to grind, then after it was
    >done I waited a few minutes. I took a big spoonful out and stirred it into
    >some ketchup to try with some krab, and I mixed a little white vinegar in
    >with the rest and packed it into canning jars.
    >
    > The fresh stuff is deceptive. It doesn't smell all that strong. It's kind
    > of sweet and has no bitterness to it at all. Then a few milliseconds
    > later it attacks your soft palate and sinuses.
    > <snort> Hoo-wee! <choke>.
    >
    > From just one root I filled a widemouth pint jar and a little jelly jar.
    > It wasn't nearly the biggest, and I've got about 6 or 7 more to go. Think
    > I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and freeze the big ones in
    > big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.
    >
    > Bob

    I remember my first experience with a blender and my horseradish. I'd
    already nibbled a bit of the root and wasn't impressed. That all changed
    when I took the lid off the mixed stuff in the blender and took a good, deep
    whiff. That peeled the tissue right off my sinuses. This will be the first
    year for my new horseradish plants. I haven't grown any in a long time. I
    just saw a program on TV the other night that said that the finer the roots
    are ground, the more hot and pungent the sauce will be. Haven't tried it
    yet to find out.
    Janet



  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 16:09:32 -0500, zxcvbob wrote:

    > The fresh stuff is deceptive. It doesn't smell all that strong.
    > It's kind of sweet and has no bitterness to it at all. Then a few
    > milliseconds later it attacks your soft palate and sinuses.
    > <snort> Hoo-wee! <choke>.


    I first just took a little nibble of a peeled root. And then
    thinking it was old and bunk, took a carrot sized bite off of it and
    started chewing...

    > From just one root I filled a widemouth pint jar and a little jelly
    > jar. It wasn't nearly the biggest, and I've got about 6 or 7 more
    > to go.


    You'll probably find that horseradish has diminished in flavor by
    98% in 3 days. Mine did. I'm not what you do to preserve the
    fumes/heat.

    -sw

  9. #9
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    In article <[email protected]>,
    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I dug the horseradish from the garden yesterday for the first time.
    > Today I peeled and ground one of the roots. I have never eaten
    > fresh horseradish before, just prepared horseradish from the little
    > jars at the store. I knew to take the blender outside, although now
    > I'm not sure that was necessary. I had to add some water to get it
    > to grind, then after it was done I waited a few minutes. I took a
    > big spoonful out and stirred it into some ketchup to try with some
    > krab, and I mixed a little white vinegar in with the rest and packed
    > it into canning jars.
    >
    > The fresh stuff is deceptive. It doesn't smell all that strong.
    > It's kind of sweet and has no bitterness to it at all. Then a few
    > milliseconds later it attacks your soft palate and sinuses.
    > <snort> Hoo-wee! <choke>.
    >
    > From just one root I filled a widemouth pint jar and a little jelly
    > jar. It wasn't nearly the biggest, and I've got about 6 or 7 more
    > to go. Think I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and
    > freeze the big ones in big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.
    >
    > Bob


    It spreads.
    I opted for a small jar of already-prepared from Kramarczuk's rather
    than pay $3/lb to grate my own. Glad you're enjoying it.
    (Side note: I read "kraut" instead of "krab" and my first thought was,
    "NOW what in hell is doing!?" "-)


    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Updated 4-2-2010

  10. #10
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 16:31:24 -0500, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Mark Thorson wrote:
    >> zxcvbob wrote:
    >>> to go. Think I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and
    >>> freeze the big ones in big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.

    >>
    >> Are you trying to breed a smaller horseradish plant?

    >
    >
    >That's a good point. No, these are the smallest roots broken off
    >from the same plants.


    Once harvested horseradish doesn't freeze well, whole or prepared.

    http://homecooking.about.com/od/food...radishstor.htm




  11. #11
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've never tried the fresh, but I found this description fascinating:
    >
    > http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Armo_rus.html


    The picture of the flowering leaves brought back memories from childhood.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Updated 4-2-2010

  12. #12
    critters & me in azusa, ca Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    On Apr 4, 2:09*pm, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    > I dug the horseradish from the garden yesterday for the first time.
    > * Today I peeled and ground one of the roots. *I have never eaten
    > fresh horseradish before, just prepared horseradish from the little
    > jars at the store. *I knew to take the blender outside, although now
    > I'm not sure that was necessary. *I had to add some water to get it
    > to grind, then after it was done I waited a few minutes. *I took a
    > big spoonful out and stirred it into some ketchup to try with some
    > krab, and I mixed a little white vinegar in with the rest and packed
    > it into canning jars.
    >
    > The fresh stuff is deceptive. *It doesn't smell all that strong.
    > It's kind of sweet and has no bitterness to it at all. *Then a few
    > milliseconds later it attacks your soft palate and sinuses.
    > <snort> Hoo-wee! <choke>.
    >
    > *From just one root I filled a widemouth pint jar and a little jelly
    > jar. *It wasn't nearly the biggest, and I've got about 6 or 7 more
    > to go. *Think I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and
    > freeze the big ones in big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.
    >
    > Bob


    the brand i buy, "atomic horseradish" is made nearby in the city of
    industry (yeah, that's the name of a real place here in socal) and
    they grind up fresh parsnips with the horseradish, in addition to a
    bit of vinegar & salt. all of the old guys at the little synagogue i
    attend just love it.

    harriet & critters in wonderfully cool azusa.

  13. #13
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 16:09:32 -0500, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I dug the horseradish from the garden yesterday for the first time.
    > Today I peeled and ground one of the roots. I have never eaten
    >fresh horseradish before, just prepared horseradish from the little
    >jars at the store. I knew to take the blender outside, although now
    >I'm not sure that was necessary. I had to add some water to get it
    >to grind, then after it was done I waited a few minutes. I took a
    >big spoonful out and stirred it into some ketchup to try with some
    >krab, and I mixed a little white vinegar in with the rest and packed
    >it into canning jars.
    >
    >The fresh stuff is deceptive. It doesn't smell all that strong.
    >It's kind of sweet and has no bitterness to it at all. Then a few
    >milliseconds later it attacks your soft palate and sinuses.
    ><snort> Hoo-wee! <choke>.
    >
    > From just one root I filled a widemouth pint jar and a little jelly
    >jar. It wasn't nearly the biggest, and I've got about 6 or 7 more
    >to go. Think I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and
    >freeze the big ones in big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.


    Horseradish is best grated, a blender will rupture too many cells
    which will cause it to go weak rapidly. My grandmother used to grate
    hers on an outside window ledge on a calm day, no wind, with the
    window sash pulled down close to her wrists.

  14. #14
    Dave Balderstone Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    In article <[email protected]>, zxcvbob
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > That's a good point. No, these are the smallest roots broken off
    > from the same plants.


    If there is a single cell left in the ground, you do not need to
    replant horseradish.

  15. #15
    Dave Balderstone Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    In article <zcnlwy5uvxle$.[email protected]>, Sqwertz
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You'll probably find that horseradish has diminished in flavor by
    > 98% in 3 days. Mine did. I'm not what you do to preserve the
    > fumes/heat.


    The longer it sits, the more heat is lost. Process it in a BWB when
    it's at the heat level you like to lock it in.

  16. #16
    heyjoe Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    On Sun, 04 Apr 2010 16:43:04 -0600, Dave Balderstone wrote:

    > If there is a single cell left in the ground, you do not need to
    > replant horseradish.


    That's what I've heard - invasive - aggressive - and hard to get rid of.
    Not unlike other weeds. It's reputation stops me from a test planting.

    --
    Posting from groups.google.com or www.foodbanter.com or other web-forums
    dramatically reduces the chance of your post being read.
    Use the real usenet!
    Eternal-september is free, <http://www.eternal-september.org/>.

  17. #17
    maxine in ri Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    On Apr 4, 5:33*pm, Dan Abel <da...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > In article <81sdgbFau...@mid.individual.net>,
    >
    >
    >
    > *zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    > > I dug the horseradish from the garden yesterday for the first time.
    > > * Today I peeled and ground one of the roots. *I have never eaten
    > > fresh horseradish before, just prepared horseradish from the little
    > > jars at the store. *I knew to take the blender outside, although now
    > > I'm not sure that was necessary. *I had to add some water to get it
    > > to grind, then after it was done I waited a few minutes. *I took a
    > > big spoonful out and stirred it into some ketchup to try with some
    > > krab, and I mixed a little white vinegar in with the rest and packed
    > > it into canning jars.

    >
    > > The fresh stuff is deceptive. *It doesn't smell all that strong.
    > > It's kind of sweet and has no bitterness to it at all. *Then a few
    > > milliseconds later it attacks your soft palate and sinuses.
    > > <snort> Hoo-wee! <choke>.

    >
    > > *From just one root I filled a widemouth pint jar and a little jelly
    > > jar. *It wasn't nearly the biggest, and I've got about 6 or 7 more
    > > to go. *Think I'll just replant the smallest ones, and peel and
    > > freeze the big ones in big chunks to be thawed and ground as needed.

    >
    > I've never tried the fresh, but I found this description fascinating:
    >
    > http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Armo_rus.html
    >
    > The local store seems to always have it for sale, at US$9.99 a pound. *I
    > weighed a small one, and it was about a tenth of a pound, so pretty
    > reasonable.
    >
    > My mother always talked about growing it in their home garden when she
    > was a kid.


    $10 a pound is not reasonable. It's been $2-4 around here. I have
    the last of mine in water, and the leaves are starting to perk up.
    I've tried 3 times to plant these suckers, and had leaves one year
    that some critter ate. Will try one more time, with a plant with a
    fence around it and see what happens.

    maxine in ri

  18. #18
    Brian Mailman Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    zxcvbob wrote:

    > The fresh stuff is deceptive. It doesn't smell all that strong.
    > It's kind of sweet and has no bitterness to it at all. Then a few
    > milliseconds later it attacks your soft palate and sinuses.
    > <snort> Hoo-wee! <choke>.


    "A good horseradish will clean your soul," is the old country saying .

    B/

  19. #19
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    In article <040420101643045544%dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone. ca>,
    Dave Balderstone <dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>, zxcvbob
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > That's a good point. No, these are the smallest roots broken off
    > > from the same plants.

    >
    > If there is a single cell left in the ground, you do not need to
    > replant horseradish.


    Ayup! It becomes pesty.


    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Updated 4-2-2010

  20. #20
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Fresh horseradish

    Dave Balderstone wrote:
    >
    > If there is a single cell left in the ground, you do not need to
    > replant horseradish.


    That sounds like something my mom would like.
    The last time I was in her garden, she was
    pointing out the kale and potato volunteers.

    I wonder if I could get Japanese horseradish
    fresh roots at Yaohan? If mom would grow it,
    I could make my own wasabi.

    When is the planting season?

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