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Thread: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

  1. #1
    cshenk Guest

    Default Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    Found a reasonably good deal.

    12.29lbs for 18$ We chopped it to 3 smaller bags and vacumn sealed them,
    final one with the bone and in a marinade for tomorrow's dinner. Although
    tomorrow's dinner is fairly well set, I'd like to know what others do with
    'fresh ham' since I'll have a fair amount in the freezer and am always up
    for new ways!

    Traditional for me: Char Sui pork, Asian based marinades, 'Dark cooked' (I
    don't have the right name but it's kinda like Char Su red pork only deeper
    colored), 'Plum Pork' (purple plum sauce and asian type treatment).

    Wouldn't mind something European based or maybe India?

    Meantime, Xmas dinner is a tried and true asian sort we like. Also,
    Asparagus, Brussell Sprouts, Mashed potatoes (real), Pork gravy, buttermilk
    biscuits, meekan (mandarin oranges) and whatever else falls out of the
    overstuffed fridge.


  2. #2
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    On Dec 24, 11:06*am, "cshenk" <cshe...@cox.net> wrote:
    > Found a reasonably good deal.
    >
    > 12.29lbs for 18$ *We chopped it to 3 smaller bags and vacumn sealed them,
    > final one with the bone and in a marinade for tomorrow's dinner. *Although
    > tomorrow's dinner is fairly well set, I'd like to know what others do with
    > 'fresh ham' since I'll have a fair amount in the freezer and am always up
    > for new ways!
    >
    > Traditional for me: Char Sui pork, Asian based marinades, 'Dark cooked' (I
    > don't have the right name but it's kinda like Char Su red pork only deeper
    > colored), 'Plum Pork' (purple plum sauce and asian type treatment).
    >
    > Wouldn't mind something European based or maybe India?
    >
    > Meantime, Xmas dinner is a tried and true asian sort we like. *Also,
    > Asparagus, Brussell Sprouts, Mashed potatoes (real), Pork gravy, buttermilk
    > biscuits, meekan (mandarin oranges) and whatever else falls out of the
    > overstuffed fridge.


    I love fresh, uncured ham. To me the best way is to simply rub it
    with salt and pepper and slow roast it at about 275 degrees until your
    meat thermometer reads 170 right off the bone. It comes out juicy
    and tender with an amazing 'crust' and the flavor can't be beat. I
    think it's the best pork 'roast' there is.


  3. #3
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Dec 24, 11:06*am, "cshenk" <cshe...@cox.net> wrote:
    > > Found a reasonably good deal.
    > >
    > > 12.29lbs for 18$ *We chopped it to 3 smaller bags and vacumn sealed them,
    > > final one with the bone and in a marinade for tomorrow's dinner. *Although
    > > tomorrow's dinner is fairly well set, I'd like to know what others do with
    > > 'fresh ham' since I'll have a fair amount in the freezer and am always up
    > > for new ways!
    > >
    > > Traditional for me: Char Sui pork, Asian based marinades, 'Dark cooked' (I
    > > don't have the right name but it's kinda like Char Su red pork only deeper
    > > colored), 'Plum Pork' (purple plum sauce and asian type treatment).
    > >
    > > Wouldn't mind something European based or maybe India?
    > >
    > > Meantime, Xmas dinner is a tried and true asian sort we like. *Also,
    > > Asparagus, Brussell Sprouts, Mashed potatoes (real), Pork gravy, buttermilk
    > > biscuits, meekan (mandarin oranges) and whatever else falls out of the
    > > overstuffed fridge.

    >
    > I love fresh, uncured ham. To me the best way is to simply rub it
    > with salt and pepper and slow roast it at about 275 degrees until your
    > meat thermometer reads 170 right off the bone. It comes out juicy
    > and tender with an amazing 'crust' and the flavor can't be beat. I
    > think it's the best pork 'roast' there is.


    I bought one of those this year for $.99 per lb. ;-) Still has a good
    bit of skin on it. Plan is to do a garlic herb roast with it. Stab it
    all over and stuff garlic slivers in the holes, then a bit of fresh
    thyme and rosemary to follow. Salt, pepper and dillweed the outside of
    the roast, maybe add a bit of ground lemon peel.

    Roast in the table top roaster until done. I was thinking a temp of 325
    to roast? I like the 170 internal range as well.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinelien

  4. #4
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    On Dec 24, 12:10*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In article
    > <9bc39dc0-4c31-4e00-9a1e-9ec194563...@u25g2000pra.googlegroups.com>,
    >
    >
    >
    > *ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > On Dec 24, 11:06*am, "cshenk" <cshe...@cox.net> wrote:
    > > > Found a reasonably good deal.

    >
    > > > 12.29lbs for 18$ *We chopped it to 3 smaller bags and vacumn sealedthem,
    > > > final one with the bone and in a marinade for tomorrow's dinner. *Although
    > > > tomorrow's dinner is fairly well set, I'd like to know what others dowith
    > > > 'fresh ham' since I'll have a fair amount in the freezer and am always up
    > > > for new ways!

    >
    > > > Traditional for me: Char Sui pork, Asian based marinades, 'Dark cooked' (I
    > > > don't have the right name but it's kinda like Char Su red pork only deeper
    > > > colored), 'Plum Pork' (purple plum sauce and asian type treatment).

    >
    > > > Wouldn't mind something European based or maybe India?

    >
    > > > Meantime, Xmas dinner is a tried and true asian sort we like. *Also,
    > > > Asparagus, Brussell Sprouts, Mashed potatoes (real), Pork gravy, buttermilk
    > > > biscuits, meekan (mandarin oranges) and whatever else falls out of the
    > > > overstuffed fridge.

    >
    > > I love fresh, uncured ham. * To me the best way is to simply rub it
    > > with salt and pepper and slow roast it at about 275 degrees until your
    > > meat thermometer reads 170 right off the bone. * It comes out juicy
    > > and tender with an amazing 'crust' and the flavor can't be beat. * *I
    > > think it's the best pork 'roast' there is.

    >
    > I bought one of those this year for $.99 per lb. ;-) Still has a good
    > bit of skin on it. Plan is to do a garlic herb roast with it. Stab it
    > all over and stuff garlic slivers in the holes, then a bit of fresh
    > thyme and rosemary to follow. *Salt, pepper and dillweed the outside of
    > the roast, maybe add a bit of ground lemon peel.
    >
    > Roast in the table top roaster until done. *I was thinking a temp of 325
    > to roast? *I like the 170 internal range as well.
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    > Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    > "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    > --Robert Heinelien


    A bit lower temperature will keep the meat more moist. Fresh ham
    doesn't have a lot of fat other than the outer fat cap layer. You
    can look at the recipes all over the web and they vary wildly in
    recommended temperature, so
    who'se to say? I learned to do it low and slow and it always comes
    out great. And I've found that leaving it fairly unseasoned lets the
    flavor of the meat blossom. It's really rich tasting.


  5. #5
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A bit lower temperature will keep the meat more moist. Fresh ham
    > doesn't have a lot of fat other than the outer fat cap layer. You
    > can look at the recipes all over the web and they vary wildly in
    > recommended temperature, so
    > who'se to say? I learned to do it low and slow and it always comes
    > out great. And I've found that leaving it fairly unseasoned lets the
    > flavor of the meat blossom. It's really rich tasting.


    I understand... but as a general rule, I've found pork to be best hot
    and fresh. Once a pork roast cools, it develops (to me) sort of a musty
    flavor. The garlic has seemed to eliminate that problem for me.

    To each their own, but I prefer my pork roasts well seasoned. ;-)

    I was thinking the hotter temp to give me a nice crisp skin and crust,
    but low and slow works well to tenderize.

    I guess I could up the temp for the last 10 to 15 minutes of the cook?
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinelien

  6. #6
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    On Fri, 24 Dec 2010 14:06:36 -0500, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Found a reasonably good deal.
    >
    >12.29lbs for 18$ We chopped it to 3 smaller bags and vacumn sealed them,
    >final one with the bone and in a marinade for tomorrow's dinner. Although
    >tomorrow's dinner is fairly well set, I'd like to know what others do with
    >'fresh ham' since I'll have a fair amount in the freezer and am always up
    >for new ways!
    >
    >Traditional for me: Char Sui pork, Asian based marinades, 'Dark cooked' (I
    >don't have the right name but it's kinda like Char Su red pork only deeper
    >colored), 'Plum Pork' (purple plum sauce and asian type treatment).
    >
    >Wouldn't mind something European based or maybe India?
    >
    >Meantime, Xmas dinner is a tried and true asian sort we like. Also,
    >Asparagus, Brussell Sprouts, Mashed potatoes (real), Pork gravy, buttermilk
    >biscuits, meekan (mandarin oranges) and whatever else falls out of the
    >overstuffed fridge.


    Not ever having dealt with fresh ham previously what pray tell caused
    you to just go hack it up, should have asked first. Ham doesn't lend
    itself to stir fry, stew, or grinding, it's too lean, most of its fat
    is external... it's best roasted whole or half, either bone-in or
    boned.... one of my favorites is to bone and butterfly and roast
    stuffed and rolled. But for a fresh ham noobie I'd suggest plain old
    oven roasting... I season fresh ham with Penzeys adobo.

  7. #7
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    "ImStillMags" wrote
    "cshenk" wrote:

    >> Found a reasonably good deal.


    Though not as good as Om's!

    >> Traditional for me: Char Sui pork, Asian based marinades, 'Dark cooked'
    >> (I
    >> don't have the right name but it's kinda like Char Su red pork only
    >> deeper
    >> colored), 'Plum Pork' (purple plum sauce and asian type treatment).


    >> Wouldn't mind something European based or maybe India?


    >> Meantime, Xmas dinner is a tried and true asian sort we like. Also,
    >> Asparagus, Brussell Sprouts, Mashed potatoes (real), Pork gravy,
    >> buttermilk
    >> biscuits, meekan (mandarin oranges) and whatever else falls out of the
    >> overstuffed fridge.


    Oh and corn on the cob (reason for going to the store)

    > I love fresh, uncured ham. To me the best way is to simply rub it
    > with salt and pepper and slow roast it at about 275 degrees until your
    > meat thermometer reads 170 right off the bone. It comes out juicy
    > and tender with an amazing 'crust' and the flavor can't be beat. I
    > think it's the best pork 'roast' there is.


    Low and slow, yes. This one has been partly denuded so is going in a
    covered roaster. I usually start at 275 then bump up to 325 after the crust
    is set. The particular type I'm doing today can't be done right in a
    crockpot, but many of my other types do that well. Crockpot = guaranteed
    juicy tender for this cut.


  8. #8
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    "Omelet" wrote

    > I bought one of those this year for $.99 per lb. ;-) Still has a good


    Better price than I had! Mine was 1.49lb but then I was at Harris Teeters
    and they aren't the cheapest place. Good produce overall though and you can
    get some outstanding deals there when you look about.

    My particular local one actually has a butcher counter where they know what
    they are talking about and the seafood counter is pretty good too.

    > bit of skin on it. Plan is to do a garlic herb roast with it. Stab it
    > all over and stuff garlic slivers in the holes, then a bit of fresh
    > thyme and rosemary to follow. Salt, pepper and dillweed the outside of
    > the roast, maybe add a bit of ground lemon peel.
    >
    > Roast in the table top roaster until done. I was thinking a temp of 325
    > to roast? I like the 170 internal range as well.


    I'd go a lower temp at least at the start 2 hours for this specific cut.
    Other types can take more, but this one is best 'slow and low' at least at
    the start. Adjust as you'll need about 45 mins per lb for a medium rare.
    You can bump it up though in the later stages for that fully developed crust
    appeal!


  9. #9
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    "Omelet" wrote
    > ImStillMags wrote:


    >> A bit lower temperature will keep the meat more moist. Fresh ham
    >> doesn't have a lot of fat other than the outer fat cap layer. You


    > I understand... but as a general rule, I've found pork to be best hot
    > and fresh. Once a pork roast cools, it develops (to me) sort of a musty
    > flavor. The garlic has seemed to eliminate that problem for me.


    You'd probably like some of my pork types then. They are developed around
    that.

    > To each their own, but I prefer my pork roasts well seasoned. ;-)


    Me too mostly.

    > I was thinking the hotter temp to give me a nice crisp skin and crust,
    > but low and slow works well to tenderize.
    > I guess I could up the temp for the last 10 to 15 minutes of the cook?


    Yes, or maybe last 30 mins. Not sure how big your bone in piece is! Once
    we trimmed, ours is about 5 lbs (1 of it the bone).

    The bone is the special reason for wanting pork at Xmas here. The bone then
    gets recycled to Hopping John for New Years along with the pork scraps.


  10. #10
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    "Brooklyn1" wrote
    > "cshenk" wrote:


    >>Found a reasonably good deal.


    1.49lb btw.

    >>12.29lbs for 18$ We chopped it to 3 smaller bags and vacumn sealed them,
    >>final one with the bone and in a marinade for tomorrow's dinner. Although
    >>tomorrow's dinner is fairly well set, I'd like to know what others do with
    >>'fresh ham' since I'll have a fair amount in the freezer and am always up
    >>for new ways!


    > Not ever having dealt with fresh ham previously what pray tell caused
    > you to just go hack it up, should have asked first.


    You've never had a fresh ham before? I do seem to recall from last year
    that this 'cut' isn't available everywhere. Either way, the cooking of it
    is not like that of cured ham and the flavor is very different as well
    though it's the same part of the animal.

    > Ham doesn't lend
    > itself to stir fry, stew, or grinding, it's too lean, most of its fat
    > is external... it's best roasted whole or half, either bone-in or
    > boned.... one of my favorites is to bone and butterfly and roast
    > stuffed and rolled. But for a fresh ham noobie I'd suggest plain old
    > oven roasting... I season fresh ham with Penzeys adobo.


    Um, might be a misread here. I was asking what 'new to me methods' others
    may have. I've been making fresh ham dishes for decades, mostly in asiatic
    ways.

    Adobo crusted eh? Thats different from what I do! Again, Xmas dinner
    already settled. I'm looking about at new ideas come January or so when the
    other 6 lbs (one bag, about 2.5, the other a good 4 and maybe a little more)
    get defrosted.

    I saw another with a curry-mustard rub that looked interesting.


  11. #11
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    "cshenk" wrote:
    >"ImStillMags" wrote
    >"cshenk" wrote:
    >
    >>> Found a reasonably good deal.

    >
    >Though not as good as Om's!


    Not necessarily. There're many factors by which to judge fresh ham,
    of which the least is price. Aside from how the pigs are raised/fed,
    and age/weight at slaughter, how the ham is cut makes a huge
    difference in value; extra long shank section adds waste but most
    important is how high up on the hip the ham is severed, often that can
    add some 20% waste, and then how the skin and fat are trimmed can add
    another 5%-10%. A low price usually means poor quality and excessive
    waste. There's not a lot of room for mark up with pork and butchers
    ain't stupid... when the price is at the 99 point, especially around
    holidays, you can bet your bippee it aint the best ham and there's
    waste aplenty.

  12. #12
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    "Brooklyn1" wrote
    > "cshenk" wrote:
    >>"ImStillMags" wrote


    >>>> Found a reasonably good deal.


    >>Though not as good as Om's!


    > Not necessarily. There're many factors by which to judge fresh ham,
    > of which the least is price. Aside from how the pigs are raised/fed,
    > and age/weight at slaughter, how the ham is cut makes a huge
    > difference in value; extra long shank section adds waste but most
    > important is how high up on the hip the ham is severed, often that can
    > add some 20% waste, and then how the skin and fat are trimmed can add
    > another 5%-10%. A low price usually means poor quality and excessive
    > waste. There's not a lot of room for mark up with pork and butchers
    > ain't stupid... when the price is at the 99 point, especially around
    > holidays, you can bet your bippee it aint the best ham and there's
    > waste aplenty.


    She mentioned her had skin still. Mine doesnt. Well trimmed but still bone
    in (we have a New Years Hoppin John with the bone so it's not a waste to
    us). I have a trimmed fat cap and would rather have had the whole fat cap
    as we use that too in other dishes. Enough is left though to make a decent
    pork dish with it.


  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > Not ever having dealt with fresh ham previously what pray tell caused
    > you to just go hack it up, should have asked first. Ham doesn't lend
    > itself to stir fry, stew, or grinding, it's too lean, most of its fat
    > is external... it's best roasted whole or half, either bone-in or
    > boned.... one of my favorites is to bone and butterfly and roast
    > stuffed and rolled. But for a fresh ham noobie I'd suggest plain old
    > oven roasting... I season fresh ham with Penzeys adobo.


    Mm, never thought of removing the bone and stuffing one. I'll have to
    try that next time I can score one for that price. :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinelien

  14. #14
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Omelet" wrote
    >
    > > I bought one of those this year for $.99 per lb. ;-) Still has a good

    >
    > Better price than I had! Mine was 1.49lb but then I was at Harris Teeters
    > and they aren't the cheapest place. Good produce overall though and you can
    > get some outstanding deals there when you look about.


    This was unusual. It's most often boneless shoulder roasts (and they
    had those right next to them) for that price. They were in a display for
    making tamales so the Masa and corn husks were displayed with them. <g>

    Wish I had freezer space to spare, I'd have grabbed a couple more of
    them.

    >
    > My particular local one actually has a butcher counter where they know what
    > they are talking about and the seafood counter is pretty good too.


    Same here!

    >
    > > bit of skin on it. Plan is to do a garlic herb roast with it. Stab it
    > > all over and stuff garlic slivers in the holes, then a bit of fresh
    > > thyme and rosemary to follow. Salt, pepper and dillweed the outside of
    > > the roast, maybe add a bit of ground lemon peel.
    > >
    > > Roast in the table top roaster until done. I was thinking a temp of 325
    > > to roast? I like the 170 internal range as well.

    >
    > I'd go a lower temp at least at the start 2 hours for this specific cut.
    > Other types can take more, but this one is best 'slow and low' at least at
    > the start. Adjust as you'll need about 45 mins per lb for a medium rare.
    > You can bump it up though in the later stages for that fully developed crust
    > appeal!


    I'm thinking along those lines. Thanks. :-)

    I'll be spending Christmas with sis' and brother in law and the nephews.
    I'll cook for dad and I on Sunday.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinelien

  15. #15
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Omelet" wrote
    > > ImStillMags wrote:

    >
    > >> A bit lower temperature will keep the meat more moist. Fresh ham
    > >> doesn't have a lot of fat other than the outer fat cap layer. You

    >
    > > I understand... but as a general rule, I've found pork to be best hot
    > > and fresh. Once a pork roast cools, it develops (to me) sort of a musty
    > > flavor. The garlic has seemed to eliminate that problem for me.

    >
    > You'd probably like some of my pork types then. They are developed around
    > that.
    >
    > > To each their own, but I prefer my pork roasts well seasoned. ;-)

    >
    > Me too mostly.
    >
    > > I was thinking the hotter temp to give me a nice crisp skin and crust,
    > > but low and slow works well to tenderize.
    > > I guess I could up the temp for the last 10 to 15 minutes of the cook?

    >
    > Yes, or maybe last 30 mins. Not sure how big your bone in piece is! Once
    > we trimmed, ours is about 5 lbs (1 of it the bone).


    It's out in the 'frige. I'm not sure of the weight at the moment. I'll
    not worry so much about the time. I have that Polder now with the probe
    thermometer that leads by a wire to the digital readout. It has an
    alarm I can set when the temp hits just right. So I think I'll go to 155
    internal for the alarm, then bump the heat up and change the alarm
    setting. That ought to do it.

    >
    > The bone is the special reason for wanting pork at Xmas here. The bone then
    > gets recycled to Hopping John for New Years along with the pork scraps.


    Yum! I'll recycle mine to either lentils or split peas. I have both in
    the pantry.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinelien

  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > "cshenk" wrote:
    > >"ImStillMags" wrote
    > >"cshenk" wrote:
    > >
    > >>> Found a reasonably good deal.

    > >
    > >Though not as good as Om's!

    >
    > Not necessarily. There're many factors by which to judge fresh ham,
    > of which the least is price. Aside from how the pigs are raised/fed,
    > and age/weight at slaughter, how the ham is cut makes a huge
    > difference in value; extra long shank section adds waste but most
    > important is how high up on the hip the ham is severed, often that can
    > add some 20% waste, and then how the skin and fat are trimmed can add
    > another 5%-10%. A low price usually means poor quality and excessive
    > waste. There's not a lot of room for mark up with pork and butchers
    > ain't stupid... when the price is at the 99 point, especially around
    > holidays, you can bet your bippee it aint the best ham and there's
    > waste aplenty.


    Nah. Some pork cuts are marked down around here only over the Holidaze
    as they sell high volume to the many local folks that make Tamales.
    These were in the same case as the $.99 boneless pork shoulder roasts.

    The meat is plenty good.

    I'll take pics since I am off Sunday. This cut looks really good!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinelien

  17. #17
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Brooklyn1" wrote
    > > "cshenk" wrote:
    > >>"ImStillMags" wrote

    >
    > >>>> Found a reasonably good deal.

    >
    > >>Though not as good as Om's!

    >
    > > Not necessarily. There're many factors by which to judge fresh ham,
    > > of which the least is price. Aside from how the pigs are raised/fed,
    > > and age/weight at slaughter, how the ham is cut makes a huge
    > > difference in value; extra long shank section adds waste but most
    > > important is how high up on the hip the ham is severed, often that can
    > > add some 20% waste, and then how the skin and fat are trimmed can add
    > > another 5%-10%. A low price usually means poor quality and excessive
    > > waste. There's not a lot of room for mark up with pork and butchers
    > > ain't stupid... when the price is at the 99 point, especially around
    > > holidays, you can bet your bippee it aint the best ham and there's
    > > waste aplenty.

    >
    > She mentioned her had skin still. Mine doesnt. Well trimmed but still bone
    > in (we have a New Years Hoppin John with the bone so it's not a waste to
    > us). I have a trimmed fat cap and would rather have had the whole fat cap
    > as we use that too in other dishes. Enough is left though to make a decent
    > pork dish with it.


    I'll take pics. <g>
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinelien

  18. #18
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    "Omelet" wrote,

    > I'll take pics. <g>


    Lol! I probably won't. Ours was hacked enough due to being a 12.29lb
    portion, that it's apt to not look as pretty. Thats ok, taste is the main
    part. The 'roasts' we cut off of it will cook up prettier due to shape.

    Carol


  19. #19
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    On Fri, 24 Dec 2010 21:07:58 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >> "cshenk" wrote:
    >> >"ImStillMags" wrote
    >> >"cshenk" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >>> Found a reasonably good deal.
    >> >
    >> >Though not as good as Om's!

    >>
    >> Not necessarily. There're many factors by which to judge fresh ham,
    >> of which the least is price. Aside from how the pigs are raised/fed,
    >> and age/weight at slaughter, how the ham is cut makes a huge
    >> difference in value; extra long shank section adds waste but most
    >> important is how high up on the hip the ham is severed, often that can
    >> add some 20% waste, and then how the skin and fat are trimmed can add
    >> another 5%-10%. A low price usually means poor quality and excessive
    >> waste. There's not a lot of room for mark up with pork and butchers
    >> ain't stupid... when the price is at the 99 point, especially around
    >> holidays, you can bet your bippee it aint the best ham and there's
    >> waste aplenty.

    >
    >Nah. Some pork cuts are marked down around here only over the Holidaze
    >as they sell high volume to the many local folks that make Tamales.
    >These were in the same case as the $.99 boneless pork shoulder roasts.


    You don't need the best pork for tamales, in fact it would be wasted,
    same as using USDA prime beef for pot roast. For much Hispanic
    cooking older pork is preferred... it's tougher and has a slight
    gaminess about it, probably why you season yours beaner style, heavily
    and lots of raw garlic... you don't even taste that pork. Most hams
    are from older pigs anyway, which is why most hams are cured/smoked.
    When purchasing fresh ham choose the smallest, and don't buy by low
    price. A young fresh ham is the king of pork... there are many ways
    to season it but always minimally. Do not treat fresh ham like it's
    pernil/shoulder. I almost bought a butt half, but since it was going
    to be just me this Christmas I bought sausages instead. I'll be
    having company for New Years, I'll consider a fresh ham. Good fresh
    ham around here runs $1.49 for whole ones... 99/lb was five years ago
    price.... the Hispanic markets sell 99/lb hams, but I wouldn't buy
    those, I can tell from the large size and darker color that they are
    from older hogs, heavy with fat and bone and not the best flesh.

    >The meat is plenty good.


    With how you season how would you know?

    >I'll take pics since I am off Sunday. This cut looks really good!


    No one can judge flavor of anything from a picture... unless they have
    their sense of smell in their eyes... like those with TIAD. LOL

    The last fresh hams I cooked that I took pictures of was in 2006, I'm
    sure you saw them; raw, seasoned, and cooked... one a butt half, one a
    shank half.

  20. #20
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: Fresh bone in 'Ham'

    On 12/24/2010 4:38 PM, cshenk wrote:
    >
    > The bone is the special reason for wanting pork at Xmas here. The
    > bone then gets recycled to Hopping John for New Years along with the
    > pork scraps.


    We are so accustomed to cooking with bacon fat and ham bones, that we
    like the ham just for the bone. They are great for cooking turnip
    greens, pinto beans, cabbage, black-eyed peas, or purple hull peas,
    which are my favorite.

    I like bacon, but I cook it mostly for the bacon fat.

    Becca

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