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Thread: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

  1. #1
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    By MAÏA de la BAUME

    International Herald Tribune

    PARIS - Julia Child may have been America's best-known "French chef,"
    but here in Paris few know her fabled cookbooks, let alone her name.

    Posters for the movie "Julie & Julia" were plastered across the city
    before its release here on Wednesday. But the movie was being
    anticipated more for Meryl Streep's performance as Ms. Child than for
    any particular interest in Ms. Child, the principal author of "Mastering
    the Art of French Cooking," who died in 2004.

    Ms. Child's book - beloved by American cooks for almost 50 years and now
    a best-seller because of the film - has never been translated into
    French, said Anne Perrier, a manager at Galignani, an English-language
    bookshop here. "It's the vision of a revisited France, adapted to the
    American taste, at a time when tastes were lifeless," she said.

    In an interview in the French daily newspaper Le Figaro last week, Ms.
    Streep said: "What surprises me is that the French don't know her at
    all. While for Americans, she was one of the best ambassadors of France
    .... since Lafayette!"

    French food experts are divided about Ms. Child and her cooking. Some
    say she caricatured French cuisine in her book and cooking show, making
    it seem too heavy and formal. Others believe she demystified it and see
    her as a role model in France, where cooking shows are rare and cuisine
    is not necessarily viewed as something anyone can interpret.

    "Julia Child's cuisine is academic and bourgeois," said Julie Andrieu, a
    television personality and cookbook author. "It shows that in America,
    the cliché of beef, baguette and canard farci remains."
    For Jean-Claude Ribaut, the food critic at Le Monde, Ms. Child was more
    like "a mediator who promoted the French lifestyle in the United States,
    but had no influence on restaurateurs."

    But some chefs say they hope that the film will rehabilitate French
    cooking in the United States. Gilles Epié, a chef who met Ms. Child in
    Los Angeles at a birthday party for her in the early 1990s, thinks
    French cooking has been tarnished as stodgy.

    "Americans have really slammed French cuisine," Mr. Epié said. "They
    think we only eat boeuf bourguignon and rabbit stew, which is wrong."

    Before taking over the Citrus Étoile, in the Eighth Arrondissement, Mr.
    Epié ran the Los Angeles restaurant L'Orangerie for more than three
    years. He remembered with distaste the strictness of American health
    rules about food.

    "My fish shop in Santa Monica smelled like a pharmacy" instead of like
    fresh fish, he said. "And when I asked for a three-month-old baby lamb,
    like you can find here, they thought I was crazy and nearly called the
    police."

    But some French chefs say they believe that Ms. Child, through the film,
    could have an impact on contemporary French cooking, or at least make
    boeuf bourguignon, a traditional dish currently absent from most French
    menus, fashionable again.

    "She explains her recipes like a housewife, but she knows how to do it
    and she does it genuinely," said Guy Savoy, owner of the restaurant that
    bears his name in Paris. He met Ms. Child in 1981 in Massachusetts and
    remembered her as "a real character, gentle and affable."

    Ms. Andrieu, the cookbook author, said that despite Ms. Child's clichéd
    recipes, her style could be defined as a "combination of scientific and
    empirical virtues" that helped explain why Americans wrote better
    cookbooks than the French.

    "The French think that they are natural-born cooks; they prepare a dish
    off the top of their heads, without testing it," she said. "In France,
    we rush over explanations."

    After watching "Julie & Julia," Ms. Andrieu said, she felt compelled to
    go home and make boeuf bourguignon according to Ms. Child's recipe. "I
    cut the flour in half, and it turned out to be the best I had ever
    made," she said.

    Mr. Epié even thinks that Ms. Child's story should encourage the French
    to discuss their cuisine in a more democratic way.

    He is one of the few respected chefs in Paris to offer American food on
    his menu, including his signature dish: a crab cake à la française,
    prepared with shellfish oil instead of mayonnaise.

    "I want to do Julia Child, but Julia Child with real fish, real lobster,
    with eels to shuck and rabbit to bone," he said. "That's my dream."

  2. #2
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 17:51:10 +0200, Victor Sack wrote:

    > A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate
    >
    > By MAÏA de la BAUME
    >
    > International Herald Tribune
    >
    > PARIS - Julia Child may have been America's best-known "French chef,"
    > but here in Paris few know her fabled cookbooks, let alone her name.
    >
    > Posters for the movie "Julie & Julia" were plastered across the city
    > before its release here on Wednesday. But the movie was being
    > anticipated more for Meryl Streep's performance as Ms. Child than for
    > any particular interest in Ms. Child, the principal author of "Mastering
    > the Art of French Cooking," who died in 2004.
    >
    > Ms. Child's book - beloved by American cooks for almost 50 years and now
    > a best-seller because of the film - has never been translated into
    > French, said Anne Perrier, a manager at Galignani, an English-language
    > bookshop here. "It's the vision of a revisited France, adapted to the
    > American taste, at a time when tastes were lifeless," she said.
    >


    i would be interested to know if there is the same interest in fine cooking
    at home in france as there is in (some) households in the u.s. i somehow
    have the idea that the french may eat better when they eat out, but that
    there is not that much interest in home cooking.

    "in France, where cooking shows are rare and cuisine
    is not necessarily viewed as something anyone can interpret."

    i'm probably completely wrong, but does anyone have a handle on this?

    your pal,
    blake

  3. #3
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate


    "blake murphy"
    > i would be interested to know if there is the same interest in fine
    > cooking> at home in france as there is in (some) households in the u.s. i
    > somehow
    > have the idea that the french may eat better when they eat out, but that>
    > there is not that much interest in home cooking.


    In my experience cookery is done with considerable respect in most homes,
    but home cookery is not at all like haute cuisine. Many city kitchens are
    tiny and underequipped by our standards, like no oven? Cassoulet might be
    made at your family's country house, but it would sound absurd to many to
    make it in a Paris apartment.

    Things are altering, and maybe even faster than here, but instant foods
    don't have the same hold in France or Italy that they have in the US.



  4. #4
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    Victor Sack wrote:
    > A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate
    >
    > By MAÏA de la BAUME
    >
    > International Herald Tribune
    >
    > PARIS - Julia Child may have been America's best-known "French chef,"
    > but here in Paris few know her fabled cookbooks, let alone her name.
    >


    >
    > Ms. Child's book - beloved by American cooks for almost 50 years and now
    > a best-seller because of the film - has never been translated into
    > French, said Anne Perrier, a manager at Galignani, an English-language
    > bookshop here. "It's the vision of a revisited France, adapted to the
    > American taste, at a time when tastes were lifeless," she said.


    >
    > French food experts are divided about Ms. Child and her cooking. Some
    > say she caricatured French cuisine in her book and cooking show, making
    > it seem too heavy and formal. Others believe she demystified it and see
    > her as a role model in France, where cooking shows are rare and cuisine
    > is not necessarily viewed as something anyone can interpret.



    Julia Child's cooking needs to be viewed in context of the time when she
    entered the scene. Women were going to work and convenience foods were
    more and more popular. She took cooking back to fresh ingredients and
    from-scratch preparation.

    People who criticize her don 't seem to have much of a sense of the history.

    gloria p

  5. #5
    graham Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1t4p2vq8iepd7.696voxpjb9zk$.[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 17:51:10 +0200, Victor Sack wrote:
    >
    >> A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate
    >>
    >> By MAÏA de la BAUME
    >>
    >> International Herald Tribune
    >>
    >> PARIS - Julia Child may have been America's best-known "French chef,"
    >> but here in Paris few know her fabled cookbooks, let alone her name.
    >>
    >> Posters for the movie "Julie & Julia" were plastered across the city
    >> before its release here on Wednesday. But the movie was being
    >> anticipated more for Meryl Streep's performance as Ms. Child than for
    >> any particular interest in Ms. Child, the principal author of "Mastering
    >> the Art of French Cooking," who died in 2004.
    >>
    >> Ms. Child's book - beloved by American cooks for almost 50 years and now
    >> a best-seller because of the film - has never been translated into
    >> French, said Anne Perrier, a manager at Galignani, an English-language
    >> bookshop here. "It's the vision of a revisited France, adapted to the
    >> American taste, at a time when tastes were lifeless," she said.
    >>

    >
    > i would be interested to know if there is the same interest in fine
    > cooking
    > at home in france as there is in (some) households in the u.s. i somehow
    > have the idea that the french may eat better when they eat out, but that
    > there is not that much interest in home cooking.
    >
    > "in France, where cooking shows are rare and cuisine
    > is not necessarily viewed as something anyone can interpret."
    >
    > i'm probably completely wrong, but does anyone have a handle on this?
    >


    A know a teacher at the local Alliance Française who comes from Normandy but
    who spent some years in the UK as a teacher. She maintains that the average
    English housewife is a better cook than her French counterpart.
    Graham



  6. #6
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    On Thu, 17 Sep 2009 19:37:38 +0200, "Giusi" <decobabe@gm[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"blake murphy"
    >> i would be interested to know if there is the same interest in fine
    >> cooking> at home in france as there is in (some) households in the u.s. i
    >> somehow
    >> have the idea that the french may eat better when they eat out, but that>
    >> there is not that much interest in home cooking.

    >
    >In my experience cookery is done with considerable respect in most homes,
    >but home cookery is not at all like haute cuisine. Many city kitchens are
    >tiny and underequipped by our standards, like no oven? Cassoulet might be
    >made at your family's country house, but it would sound absurd to many to
    >make it in a Paris apartment.
    >
    >Things are altering, and maybe even faster than here, but instant foods
    >don't have the same hold in France or Italy that they have in the US.
    >

    I recall dining at a friend's apartment in Paris many years ago. The
    kitchen was barely a large closet. Sink, half-fridge with a counter
    top above it, small, 4 burner stove (although IIRC, it did have an
    oven). Only one person could be in the kitchen at a time.

    My friend made a fabulous meal of salt cod (think of that soaking!)
    with new potatoes, haricots verts, and a heavenly garlic aioli. What a
    wonderful meal. Everything was from scratch.

    Boron

  7. #7
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    Giusi wrote:

    >
    > In my experience cookery is done with considerable respect in most homes,
    > but home cookery is not at all like haute cuisine. Many city kitchens are
    > tiny and underequipped by our standards, like no oven? Cassoulet might be
    > made at your family's country house, but it would sound absurd to many to
    > make it in a Paris apartment.
    >
    > Things are altering, and maybe even faster than here, but instant foods
    > don't have the same hold in France or Italy that they have in the US.
    >
    >


    Do you suppose it may be because most French or Italian women don't work
    40+ hours per week and 50 weeks per year? It would not surprise me if
    the lack of leisure (or family) time is one factor.

    gloria p

  8. #8
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    Gloria P wrote:

    > Giusi wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> In my experience cookery is done with considerable respect in most
    >> homes, but home cookery is not at all like haute cuisine. Many city
    >> kitchens are tiny and underequipped by our standards, like no oven?
    >> Cassoulet might be made at your family's country house, but it would
    >> sound absurd to many to make it in a Paris apartment.
    >>
    >> Things are altering, and maybe even faster than here, but instant
    >> foods don't have the same hold in France or Italy that they have in
    >> the US.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Do you suppose it may be because most French or Italian women don't
    > work 40+ hours per week and 50 weeks per year? It would not surprise
    > me if the lack of leisure (or family) time is one factor.



    Interestingly, there is a large and well - established grocery chain in
    France that sells exclusively frozen food (I forget the name) and IIRC
    France is McDonald's most profitable market...

    Many of the French peeps that I have met prefer to entertain guests at a
    restaurant instead of at home...not a problem when you have a plethora of
    great eateries to choose from.


    --
    Best
    Greg



  9. #9
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    Victor Sack wrote:
    > A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate
    >
    > By MAÏA de la BAUME
    >
    > International Herald Tribune
    >
    > PARIS - Julia Child may have been America's best-known "French chef,"
    > but here in Paris few know her fabled cookbooks, let alone her name.
    >
    > Posters for the movie "Julie & Julia" were plastered across the city
    > before its release here on Wednesday. But the movie was being
    > anticipated more for Meryl Streep's performance as Ms. Child than for
    > any particular interest in Ms. Child, the principal author of "Mastering
    > the Art of French Cooking," who died in 2004.
    >
    > Ms. Child's book - beloved by American cooks for almost 50 years and now
    > a best-seller because of the film - has never been translated into
    > French, said Anne Perrier, a manager at Galignani, an English-language
    > bookshop here. "It's the vision of a revisited France, adapted to the
    > American taste, at a time when tastes were lifeless," she said.
    >
    > In an interview in the French daily newspaper Le Figaro last week, Ms.
    > Streep said: "What surprises me is that the French don't know her at
    > all. While for Americans, she was one of the best ambassadors of France
    > ... since Lafayette!"
    >
    > French food experts are divided about Ms. Child and her cooking. Some
    > say she caricatured French cuisine in her book and cooking show, making
    > it seem too heavy and formal. Others believe she demystified it and see
    > her as a role model in France, where cooking shows are rare and cuisine
    > is not necessarily viewed as something anyone can interpret.
    >
    > "Julia Child's cuisine is academic and bourgeois," said Julie Andrieu, a
    > television personality and cookbook author. "It shows that in America,
    > the cliché of beef, baguette and canard farci remains."
    > For Jean-Claude Ribaut, the food critic at Le Monde, Ms. Child was more
    > like "a mediator who promoted the French lifestyle in the United States,
    > but had no influence on restaurateurs."
    >
    > But some chefs say they hope that the film will rehabilitate French
    > cooking in the United States. Gilles Epié, a chef who met Ms. Child in
    > Los Angeles at a birthday party for her in the early 1990s, thinks
    > French cooking has been tarnished as stodgy.
    >
    > "Americans have really slammed French cuisine," Mr. Epié said. "They
    > think we only eat boeuf bourguignon and rabbit stew, which is wrong."
    >
    > Before taking over the Citrus Étoile, in the Eighth Arrondissement, Mr.
    > Epié ran the Los Angeles restaurant L'Orangerie for more than three
    > years. He remembered with distaste the strictness of American health
    > rules about food.
    >
    > "My fish shop in Santa Monica smelled like a pharmacy" instead of like
    > fresh fish, he said. "And when I asked for a three-month-old baby lamb,
    > like you can find here, they thought I was crazy and nearly called the
    > police."
    >
    > But some French chefs say they believe that Ms. Child, through the film,
    > could have an impact on contemporary French cooking, or at least make
    > boeuf bourguignon, a traditional dish currently absent from most French
    > menus, fashionable again.
    >
    > "She explains her recipes like a housewife, but she knows how to do it
    > and she does it genuinely," said Guy Savoy, owner of the restaurant that
    > bears his name in Paris. He met Ms. Child in 1981 in Massachusetts and
    > remembered her as "a real character, gentle and affable."
    >
    > Ms. Andrieu, the cookbook author, said that despite Ms. Child's clichéd
    > recipes, her style could be defined as a "combination of scientific and
    > empirical virtues" that helped explain why Americans wrote better
    > cookbooks than the French.
    >
    > "The French think that they are natural-born cooks; they prepare a dish
    > off the top of their heads, without testing it," she said. "In France,
    > we rush over explanations."
    >
    > After watching "Julie & Julia," Ms. Andrieu said, she felt compelled to
    > go home and make boeuf bourguignon according to Ms. Child's recipe. "I
    > cut the flour in half, and it turned out to be the best I had ever
    > made," she said.
    >
    > Mr. Epié even thinks that Ms. Child's story should encourage the French
    > to discuss their cuisine in a more democratic way.
    >
    > He is one of the few respected chefs in Paris to offer American food on
    > his menu, including his signature dish: a crab cake à la française,
    > prepared with shellfish oil instead of mayonnaise.
    >
    > "I want to do Julia Child, but Julia Child with real fish, real lobster,
    > with eels to shuck and rabbit to bone," he said. "That's my dream."


    Very interesting perspective. Thanks, Victor.

    --
    Jean B.

  10. #10
    Alan Zelt Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate



    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:lcmh68p9dhd4$.[email protected]..
    > A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate
    >
    > By MAÏA de la BAUME
    >
    > International Herald Tribune
    >
    > PARIS - Julia Child may have been America's best-known "French chef,"
    > but here in Paris few know her fabled cookbooks, let alone her name.
    >


    A funny thing Victor. I thought long about that article after reading it.
    How many times do we lionize our American cultural icons as "world famous or
    world renown? This woman was a force to be reckoned with in American
    cooking. I just think how better would our meals have been when I was
    growing up if my mother had taken the time to follow her ideas? She truly
    did more to revolutionize cooking in this country.

    But worldwide. Not likely. Before this article came out, the SBF was reading
    me an article in the Swedish rag which essentially said: Julie who!

    Her reputation to me was famously earned, and displayed on television the
    way no other country had done at the time. But it did remind me that just in
    England alone, the name Delia Smith is the queen of the kitchen, unlike
    anyone else.


  11. #11
    Alan Zelt Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate



    "Gloria P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Victor Sack wrote:
    >> A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate
    >>
    >> By MAÏA de la BAUME
    >>
    >> International Herald Tribune
    >> PARIS - Julia Child may have been America's best-known "French chef,"
    >> but here in Paris few know her fabled cookbooks, let alone her name.

    >
    >> Ms. Child's book - beloved by American cooks for almost 50 years and now
    >> a best-seller because of the film - has never been translated into
    >> French, said Anne Perrier, a manager at Galignani, an English-language
    >> bookshop here. "It's the vision of a revisited France, adapted to the
    >> American taste, at a time when tastes were lifeless," she said.

    >
    >>
    >> French food experts are divided about Ms. Child and her cooking. Some
    >> say she caricatured French cuisine in her book and cooking show, making
    >> it seem too heavy and formal. Others believe she demystified it and see
    >> her as a role model in France, where cooking shows are rare and cuisine
    >> is not necessarily viewed as something anyone can interpret.

    >
    >
    > Julia Child's cooking needs to be viewed in context of the time when she
    > entered the scene. Women were going to work and convenience foods were
    > more and more popular. She took cooking back to fresh ingredients and
    > from-scratch preparation.
    >
    > People who criticize her don 't seem to have much of a sense of the
    > history.
    >
    > gloria p


    Not one person I know would criticize her. The comment is that world famous,
    in a world that truly did not know her, is a serious stretch.

    Alan


  12. #12
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate


    Saint Julia, Child of God didn't teach me to cook French food. She
    taught me not to be afraid to cook ANY food. I was 20.
    Lynn in Fargo
    z''l

  13. #13
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate


    "Gregory Morrow" > ha scritto nel messaggio
    > Gloria P wrote:
    >
    >> Giusi wrote:
    >>> In my experience cookery is done with considerable respect in most>>>
    >>> homes, but home cookery is not at all like haute cuisine. Many city>>>
    >>> kitchens are tiny and underequipped by our standards, like no oven?
    >>>
    >>> Things are altering, and maybe even faster than here, but instant>>>
    >>> foods don't have the same hold in France or Italy that they have in>>>
    >>> the US.
    >>>

    >> Do you suppose it may be because most French or Italian women don't>>
    >> work 40+ hours per week and 50 weeks per year? It would not surprise>>
    >> me if the lack of leisure (or family) time is one factor.


    They DO work 40 hours a week here and 36 in France, but they get a month's
    vacation. Think what happens to unemployment if you implement those
    standards. It's way too expensive here for women not to work.

    > Interestingly, there is a large and well - established grocery chain in>
    > France that sells exclusively frozen food (I forget the name) and IIRC>
    > France is McDonald's most profitable market...


    That's true, but a lot of it is not prepared food, but ingredients. That's
    how you can see that it is changing. We have an all-frozen seafood shop in
    my town.



  14. #14
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate


    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:lcmh68p9dhd4$.[email protected]..
    > A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate
    >
    > By MAÏA de la BAUME
    >
    > International Herald Tribune
    >
    > PARIS - Julia Child may have been America's best-known "French chef,"
    > but here in Paris few know her fabled cookbooks, let alone her name.
    >
    > Posters for the movie "Julie & Julia" were plastered across the city
    > before its release here on Wednesday. But the movie was being
    > anticipated more for Meryl Streep's performance as Ms. Child than for
    > any particular interest in Ms. Child, the principal author of "Mastering
    > the Art of French Cooking," who died in 2004.
    >
    > Ms. Child's book - beloved by American cooks for almost 50 years and now
    > a best-seller because of the film - has never been translated into
    > French, said Anne Perrier, a manager at Galignani, an English-language
    > bookshop here. "It's the vision of a revisited France, adapted to the
    > American taste, at a time when tastes were lifeless," she said.
    >
    > In an interview in the French daily newspaper Le Figaro last week, Ms.
    > Streep said: "What surprises me is that the French don't know her at
    > all. While for Americans, she was one of the best ambassadors of France
    > ... since Lafayette!"
    >
    > French food experts are divided about Ms. Child and her cooking. Some
    > say she caricatured French cuisine in her book and cooking show, making
    > it seem too heavy and formal. Others believe she demystified it and see
    > her as a role model in France, where cooking shows are rare and cuisine
    > is not necessarily viewed as something anyone can interpret.
    >
    > "Julia Child's cuisine is academic and bourgeois," said Julie Andrieu, a
    > television personality and cookbook author. "It shows that in America,
    > the cliché of beef, baguette and canard farci remains."
    > For Jean-Claude Ribaut, the food critic at Le Monde, Ms. Child was more
    > like "a mediator who promoted the French lifestyle in the United States,
    > but had no influence on restaurateurs."
    >
    > But some chefs say they hope that the film will rehabilitate French
    > cooking in the United States. Gilles Epié, a chef who met Ms. Child in
    > Los Angeles at a birthday party for her in the early 1990s, thinks
    > French cooking has been tarnished as stodgy.
    >
    > "Americans have really slammed French cuisine," Mr. Epié said. "They
    > think we only eat boeuf bourguignon and rabbit stew, which is wrong."
    >
    > Before taking over the Citrus Étoile, in the Eighth Arrondissement, Mr.
    > Epié ran the Los Angeles restaurant L'Orangerie for more than three
    > years. He remembered with distaste the strictness of American health
    > rules about food.
    >
    > "My fish shop in Santa Monica smelled like a pharmacy" instead of like
    > fresh fish, he said. "And when I asked for a three-month-old baby lamb,
    > like you can find here, they thought I was crazy and nearly called the
    > police."
    >
    > But some French chefs say they believe that Ms. Child, through the film,
    > could have an impact on contemporary French cooking, or at least make
    > boeuf bourguignon, a traditional dish currently absent from most French
    > menus, fashionable again.
    >
    > "She explains her recipes like a housewife, but she knows how to do it
    > and she does it genuinely," said Guy Savoy, owner of the restaurant that
    > bears his name in Paris. He met Ms. Child in 1981 in Massachusetts and
    > remembered her as "a real character, gentle and affable."
    >
    > Ms. Andrieu, the cookbook author, said that despite Ms. Child's clichéd
    > recipes, her style could be defined as a "combination of scientific and
    > empirical virtues" that helped explain why Americans wrote better
    > cookbooks than the French.
    >
    > "The French think that they are natural-born cooks; they prepare a dish
    > off the top of their heads, without testing it," she said. "In France,
    > we rush over explanations."
    >
    > After watching "Julie & Julia," Ms. Andrieu said, she felt compelled to
    > go home and make boeuf bourguignon according to Ms. Child's recipe. "I
    > cut the flour in half, and it turned out to be the best I had ever
    > made," she said.
    >
    > Mr. Epié even thinks that Ms. Child's story should encourage the French
    > to discuss their cuisine in a more democratic way.
    >
    > He is one of the few respected chefs in Paris to offer American food on
    > his menu, including his signature dish: a crab cake à la française,
    > prepared with shellfish oil instead of mayonnaise.
    >
    > "I want to do Julia Child, but Julia Child with real fish, real lobster,
    > with eels to shuck and rabbit to bone," he said. "That's my dream."
    >
    >

    Julia never wrote for the French. She wrote to bring the basics of French
    cuisine to us gringos who to that point had focused primarily on "surf and
    turf". "The French Chef" has recently been released on DVD and is available
    on Netflix. Check it out. It'll blow your mind!

    Kent






  15. #15
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    On Tue, 1 Dec 2009 09:23:03 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:

    -->
    -->"Victor Sack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    -->news:lcmh68p9dhd4$.[email protected]..
    -->> A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    -->Julia never wrote for the French. She wrote to bring the basics of French
    -->cuisine to us gringos who to that point had focused primarily on "surf and
    -->turf". "The French Chef" has recently been released on DVD and is available
    -->on Netflix. Check it out. It'll blow your mind!
    -->
    -->Kent
    -->

    An interview with Julia Child http://foodforu.ca/juliachild.html
    It's in six pieces as it was 2 1/2 hrs. long, this is the last interview before
    she passed on in 2004.

  16. #16
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate

    Kent wrote:
    > "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:lcmh68p9dhd4$.[email protected]..
    >> A 'French Chef' Whose Appeal Doesn't Translate
    >>
    >> By MAÏA de la BAUME
    >>
    >> International Herald Tribune
    >>
    >> PARIS - Julia Child may have been America's best-known "French chef,"
    >> but here in Paris few know her fabled cookbooks, let alone her name.
    >>
    >> Posters for the movie "Julie & Julia" were plastered across the city
    >> before its release here on Wednesday. But the movie was being
    >> anticipated more for Meryl Streep's performance as Ms. Child than for
    >> any particular interest in Ms. Child, the principal author of
    >> "Mastering the Art of French Cooking," who died in 2004.
    >>
    >> Ms. Child's book - beloved by American cooks for almost 50 years and
    >> now a best-seller because of the film - has never been translated
    >> into French, said Anne Perrier, a manager at Galignani, an
    >> English-language bookshop here. "It's the vision of a revisited
    >> France, adapted to the American taste, at a time when tastes were
    >> lifeless," she said.


    The first of a string of extremely stupid remarks by people with no
    historical perspective who don't seem to comprehend that Mastering was
    written for HOME cooks, not restauranteurs, and DELIBERATELY covered the
    classic cuisine bourgeoise and its techniques, not trendy 21st century
    restaurant food. The remarks about how Americans view French food are
    possibly the most ludicrous of all. At least there is one person who
    actually used a recipe and admitted that it was superb.

    This reminds me of the equally dumb remarks years ago by Elizabeth David on
    Julia's penchant for clear directions and measurements. David delighted in
    writing "cookbooks" with recipes that didn't work. Clearly she was happy to
    collect the royalties but unwilling to do the work, contenting herself with
    hero-worship from pretentious non-cooks.





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