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Thread: Freakish Vietnamese Eggs

  1. #1
    gtr Guest

    Default Freakish Vietnamese Eggs

    Living near Westminster, California we passed by a place my wife was
    convinced was some kinda new food joint. Two elderly Vietnamese men
    sat outside in folding chairs chatting in the night air. We walked in
    and it was nothing but counter. The man at the counter had that timid,
    frightened look that said either "I don't speak English" or "Please
    don't be the INS". On the wall was a sign with five items with prices.

    One of the old guys from outside and sidled up to help with his very
    crude English. We asked what they sold. Eggs, chicken. We looked
    again at the list on the wall and realized there were all varieties of
    that pork-cake/lunch meat stuff. Pork? We asked. Yes, he said, pork.

    They had these wide cardboard egg cartons, no lids, that held 18 eggs.
    They also had raw chicken. "Brown chicken" the old guy was quick to
    point out. What the hell, we bought a carton of eggs and a chicken. I
    roasted the chicken (almost six pounds) the following day and after
    whittling off the head, footies and disemboweling it (all new to me),
    it cooked up real pretty and tasted good too.

    Particularly in the breat area this was some jaw-working bird though.
    The two-bone section of the wing was about six inches long. This was a
    working bird. He might have pulled a cart, I don't know.

    But the eggs are gargantuan! We've never seen eggs so large. We tried
    to put 12 in an empty egg carton. and they wouldn't quite fit. Huge!

    So far we've eaten about 8 of them. 7 of them were double-yolks.
    Seven! The one that wasn't a double-yoke had the largest single yolk
    I've ever seen. I can tell by the odd somewhat stretched or longish
    aspect to the egg, that the majority of the eggs remaining are most
    likely twin-yolks.

    Has anybody encountered so many twin yolks? I'm beginning to worry that
    I'll develop breasts or grow a new appendage after eating these.
    --


  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Freakish Vietnamese Eggs

    On 3/6/2011 10:46 AM, gtr wrote:
    > Living near Westminster, California we passed by a place my wife was
    > convinced was some kinda new food joint. Two elderly Vietnamese men sat
    > outside in folding chairs chatting in the night air. We walked in and it
    > was nothing but counter. The man at the counter had that timid,
    > frightened look that said either "I don't speak English" or "Please
    > don't be the INS". On the wall was a sign with five items with prices.
    >
    > One of the old guys from outside and sidled up to help with his very
    > crude English. We asked what they sold. Eggs, chicken. We looked again
    > at the list on the wall and realized there were all varieties of that
    > pork-cake/lunch meat stuff. Pork? We asked. Yes, he said, pork.
    >
    > They had these wide cardboard egg cartons, no lids, that held 18 eggs.
    > They also had raw chicken. "Brown chicken" the old guy was quick to
    > point out. What the hell, we bought a carton of eggs and a chicken. I
    > roasted the chicken (almost six pounds) the following day and after
    > whittling off the head, footies and disemboweling it (all new to me), it
    > cooked up real pretty and tasted good too.
    >
    > Particularly in the breat area this was some jaw-working bird though.
    > The two-bone section of the wing was about six inches long. This was a
    > working bird. He might have pulled a cart, I don't know.
    >
    > But the eggs are gargantuan! We've never seen eggs so large. We tried to
    > put 12 in an empty egg carton. and they wouldn't quite fit. Huge!
    >
    > So far we've eaten about 8 of them. 7 of them were double-yolks. Seven!
    > The one that wasn't a double-yoke had the largest single yolk I've ever
    > seen. I can tell by the odd somewhat stretched or longish aspect to the
    > egg, that the majority of the eggs remaining are most likely twin-yolks.
    >
    > Has anybody encountered so many twin yolks? I'm beginning to worry that
    > I'll develop breasts or grow a new appendage after eating these.


    I wouldn't worry to much, some of the larger breeds of chicken typically
    lay double yolk eggs. We raised some years ago, can't remember the exact
    name of them but it started with Polish something, every egg either had
    a large yolk or two yolks. The birds were huge too.

  3. #3
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Freakish Vietnamese Eggs

    On Sun, 06 Mar 2011 19:01:46 -0600, George Shirley
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 3/6/2011 10:46 AM, gtr wrote:
    >> Living near Westminster, California we passed by a place my wife was
    >> convinced was some kinda new food joint. Two elderly Vietnamese men sat
    >> outside in folding chairs chatting in the night air. We walked in and it
    >> was nothing but counter. The man at the counter had that timid,
    >> frightened look that said either "I don't speak English" or "Please
    >> don't be the INS". On the wall was a sign with five items with prices.
    >>
    >> One of the old guys from outside and sidled up to help with his very
    >> crude English. We asked what they sold. Eggs, chicken. We looked again
    >> at the list on the wall and realized there were all varieties of that
    >> pork-cake/lunch meat stuff. Pork? We asked. Yes, he said, pork.
    >>
    >> They had these wide cardboard egg cartons, no lids, that held 18 eggs.
    >> They also had raw chicken. "Brown chicken" the old guy was quick to
    >> point out. What the hell, we bought a carton of eggs and a chicken. I
    >> roasted the chicken (almost six pounds) the following day and after
    >> whittling off the head, footies and disemboweling it (all new to me), it
    >> cooked up real pretty and tasted good too.
    >>
    >> Particularly in the breat area this was some jaw-working bird though.
    >> The two-bone section of the wing was about six inches long. This was a
    >> working bird. He might have pulled a cart, I don't know.
    >>
    >> But the eggs are gargantuan! We've never seen eggs so large. We tried to
    >> put 12 in an empty egg carton. and they wouldn't quite fit. Huge!
    >>
    >> So far we've eaten about 8 of them. 7 of them were double-yolks. Seven!
    >> The one that wasn't a double-yoke had the largest single yolk I've ever
    >> seen. I can tell by the odd somewhat stretched or longish aspect to the
    >> egg, that the majority of the eggs remaining are most likely twin-yolks.
    >>
    >> Has anybody encountered so many twin yolks? I'm beginning to worry that
    >> I'll develop breasts or grow a new appendage after eating these.

    >
    >I wouldn't worry to much, some of the larger breeds of chicken typically
    >lay double yolk eggs. We raised some years ago, can't remember the exact
    >name of them but it started with Polish something, every egg either had
    >a large yolk or two yolks. The birds were huge too.


    Doesn't matter... the ratio of yolk to white is the same with all
    avian eggs, even double yolkers (yolk portion is ~34%). And the
    larger breeds have not a whit to do with double yolks, has to do with
    the age of the hen.
    http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-fac...lopedia/y/yolk

  4. #4
    trung277 Guest

    Default Re: Freakish Vietnamese Eggs


    gtr;1588881 Wrote:
    > Living near Westminster, California we passed by a place my wife was
    > convinced was some kinda new food joint. Two elderly Vietnamese men
    > sat outside in folding chairs chatting in the night air. We walked in
    > and it was nothing but counter. The man at the counter had that timid,
    > frightened look that said either "I don't speak English" or "Please
    > don't be the INS". On the wall was a sign with five items with prices.
    >
    > One of the old guys from outside and sidled up to help with his very
    > crude English. We asked what they sold. Eggs, chicken. We looked
    > again at the list on the wall and realized there were all varieties of
    > that pork-cake/lunch meat stuff. Pork? We asked. Yes, he said, pork.
    >
    > They had these wide cardboard egg cartons, no lids, that held 18 eggs.
    >
    > They also had raw chicken. "Brown chicken" the old guy was quick to
    > point out. What the hell, we bought a carton of eggs and a chicken. I
    >
    > roasted the chicken (almost six pounds) the following day and after
    > whittling off the head, footies and disemboweling it (all new to me),
    > it cooked up real pretty and tasted good too.
    >
    > Particularly in the breat area this was some jaw-working bird though.
    > The two-bone section of the wing was about six inches long. This was a
    >
    > working bird. He might have pulled a cart, I don't know.
    >
    > But the eggs are gargantuan! We've never seen eggs so large. We tried
    > to put 12 in an empty egg carton. and they wouldn't quite fit. Huge!
    >
    > So far we've eaten about 8 of them. 7 of them were double-yolks.
    > Seven! The one that wasn't a double-yoke had the largest single yolk
    > I've ever seen. I can tell by the odd somewhat stretched or longish
    > aspect to the egg, that the majority of the eggs remaining are most
    > likely twin-yolks.
    >
    > Has anybody encountered so many twin yolks? I'm beginning to worry that
    >
    > I'll develop breasts or grow a new appendage after eating these.
    > --


    It's a fascinating story. I have never seen an egg with two yolks.
    Although I have heard much about it. Actually I only see them on the
    photo.




    --
    trung277

  5. #5
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Freakish Vietnamese Eggs

    On Mar 7, 12:37*am, trung277 <trung277.7ba5448.612...@foodbanter.com>
    wrote:
    > gtr;1588881 Wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Living near Westminster, California we passed by a place my wife was
    > > convinced was some kinda new food joint. *Two elderly Vietnamese men
    > > sat outside in folding chairs chatting in the night air. *We walked in
    > > and it was nothing but counter. The man at the counter had that timid,
    > > frightened look that said either "I don't speak English" or "Please
    > > don't be the INS". *On the wall was a sign with five items with prices.

    >
    > > One of the old guys from outside and sidled up to help with his very
    > > crude English. *We asked what they sold. *Eggs, chicken. *We looked
    > > again at the list on the wall and realized there were all varieties of
    > > that pork-cake/lunch meat stuff. *Pork? We asked. Yes, he said, pork.

    >
    > > They had these wide cardboard egg cartons, no lids, that held 18 eggs.

    >
    > > They also had raw chicken. *"Brown chicken" the old guy was quick to
    > > point out. *What the hell, we bought a carton of eggs and a chicken. *I

    >
    > > roasted the chicken (almost six pounds) the following day and after
    > > whittling off the head, footies and disemboweling it (all new to me),
    > > it cooked up real pretty and tasted good too.

    >
    > > Particularly in the breat area this was some jaw-working bird though. *
    > > The two-bone section of the wing was about six inches long. *This wasa

    >
    > > working bird. *He might have pulled a cart, I don't know.

    >
    > > But the eggs are gargantuan! We've never seen eggs so large. *We tried
    > > to put 12 in an empty egg carton. and they wouldn't quite fit. Huge!

    >
    > > So far we've eaten about 8 of them. *7 of them were double-yolks.
    > > Seven! *The one that wasn't a double-yoke had the largest single yolk
    > > I've ever seen. *I can tell by the odd somewhat stretched or longish
    > > aspect to the egg, that the majority of the eggs remaining are most
    > > likely twin-yolks.

    >
    > > Has anybody encountered so many twin yolks? I'm beginning to worry that

    >
    > > I'll develop breasts or grow a new appendage after eating these.
    > > --

    >
    > It's a fascinating story. I have never seen an egg with two yolks.
    > Although I have heard much about it. Actually I only see them on the
    > photo.
    >


    Years ago, my father would occasionally shop at a particular farm
    stand, and bring home a dozen eggs as part of his purchase. At least
    ten of these would be double yolkers.

  6. #6
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Freakish Vietnamese Eggs

    In article <201103060846233499-xxx@yyyzzz>, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Has anybody encountered so many twin yolks? I'm beginning to worry that
    > I'll develop breasts or grow a new appendage after eating these.


    Pullets and aging hens are the most likely to produce them. They're
    just a nice treat.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Freakish Vietnamese Eggs

    On Sun, 6 Mar 2011 08:46:23 -0800, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Living near Westminster, California we passed by a place my wife was
    >convinced was some kinda new food joint. Two elderly Vietnamese men
    >sat outside in folding chairs chatting in the night air. We walked in
    >and it was nothing but counter. The man at the counter had that timid,
    >frightened look that said either "I don't speak English" or "Please
    >don't be the INS". On the wall was a sign with five items with prices.
    >
    >One of the old guys from outside and sidled up to help with his very
    >crude English. We asked what they sold. Eggs, chicken. We looked
    >again at the list on the wall and realized there were all varieties of
    >that pork-cake/lunch meat stuff. Pork? We asked. Yes, he said, pork.
    >
    >They had these wide cardboard egg cartons, no lids, that held 18 eggs.
    >They also had raw chicken. "Brown chicken" the old guy was quick to
    >point out. What the hell, we bought a carton of eggs and a chicken. I
    >roasted the chicken (almost six pounds) the following day and after
    >whittling off the head, footies and disemboweling it (all new to me),
    >it cooked up real pretty and tasted good too.
    >
    >Particularly in the breat area this was some jaw-working bird though.
    >The two-bone section of the wing was about six inches long. This was a
    >working bird. He might have pulled a cart, I don't know.
    >
    >But the eggs are gargantuan! We've never seen eggs so large. We tried
    >to put 12 in an empty egg carton. and they wouldn't quite fit. Huge!
    >
    >So far we've eaten about 8 of them. 7 of them were double-yolks.
    >Seven! The one that wasn't a double-yoke had the largest single yolk
    >I've ever seen. I can tell by the odd somewhat stretched or longish
    >aspect to the egg, that the majority of the eggs remaining are most
    >likely twin-yolks.
    >
    >Has anybody encountered so many twin yolks? I'm beginning to worry that
    >I'll develop breasts or grow a new appendage after eating these.


    Just be careful buying eggs in Asian markets. Make sure you get the
    right kind. I don't consider myself to have an abnormally weak stomach
    but, if I was to accidentally buy and attempt to use balut I think I
    might lose it. http://www.ramendays.com/balut-egg/
    Externally, they look no different.
    At least the proprietors of the local Vietnamese market warned me away
    from that particular stack of eggs in flats.

    Ross.

  8. #8
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: Freakish Vietnamese Eggs

    On 3/6/2011 10:46 AM, gtr wrote:
    >
    > So far we've eaten about 8 of them. 7 of them were double-yolks.
    > Seven! The one that wasn't a double-yoke had the largest single yolk
    > I've ever seen. I can tell by the odd somewhat stretched or longish
    > aspect to the egg, that the majority of the eggs remaining are most
    > likely twin-yolks.
    >
    > Has anybody encountered so many twin yolks? I'm beginning to worry
    > that I'll develop breasts or grow a new appendage after eating these.


    My sister has chickens and many of her eggs have double yolks. Her
    chickens are a little older, but she has a few new ones. The new
    chickens produce eggs that are not very big.

    Becca

  9. #9
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: Freakish Vietnamese Eggs

    Thanks for the input. But it seems I'm still developing the breasts...
    --
    Ronald Reagan made a lack of compassion fashionable.
    -- Mario Cuomo


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