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Thread: foodies on special diets

  1. #1
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default foodies on special diets

    Hi all. Over the past few months, I'm beginning to come to terms with my pre-
    diabetes and have arrived at a number of troubling realizations. As I survey
    many of the usenet diabetes support groups, I find few foodies or people for
    whom food takes on largely aesthetic and cultural meanings. These folks seem to
    eat on the basis of science and health. In one exchange, I found myself talking
    to someone who never eats socially, who never goes to gatherings with the
    express purpose of sharing food. Being totally blind, food is a huge source of
    pleasure and human connection in my life.

    How can I bridge the gap between what my body needs to eat and what I enjoy as
    a foodie? How do many of you strike this balance? If you're low-carbing and
    your friends want to go out for dim sum or French pastries, how do you tag
    along without feeling excluded? Also, how do the aesthetics of portion control,
    weighing and measuring intersect in your lives with spontaneity and sheer
    pleasure in food? I look forward to some lively discussions.

    Thanks,
    Orlando

  2. #2
    Je▀us Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    On Tue, 17 Aug 2010 03:45:35 -0400, Orlando Enrique Fiol
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi all. Over the past few months, I'm beginning to come to terms with my pre-
    >diabetes and have arrived at a number of troubling realizations. As I survey
    >many of the usenet diabetes support groups, I find few foodies or people for
    >whom food takes on largely aesthetic and cultural meanings. These folks seem to
    >eat on the basis of science and health.


    Sounds a little like myself. For many years my priority was nutrition
    and health. Nowadays I combine the former with what I guess you could
    call 'foodie' food It can be done, although maybe not for
    everything. For example, I made Sauerbraten the other night for the
    g/f's birthday - nothing 'bad' in there for either of us (she is also
    gluten/grain sensitive).

    I'm sensitive to most grains and avoid them as much as possible (with
    the occasional transgression). I also low carb - or at least I did for
    years - these days I find no need to be obsessive about it. My
    lifestyle in recent years seems to be working well for me and now I
    find I can get away with eating potatoes, for example. But I still try
    to limit such things to a degree.

    > In one exchange, I found myself talking
    >to someone who never eats socially, who never goes to gatherings with the
    >express purpose of sharing food. Being totally blind, food is a huge source of
    >pleasure and human connection in my life.
    >
    >How can I bridge the gap between what my body needs to eat and what I enjoy as
    >a foodie?


    I find that I can manage to modify most recipes enough to make them
    suitable for my dietary needs without really compromising the finished
    dish.

    >How do many of you strike this balance? If you're low-carbing and
    >your friends want to go out for dim sum or French pastries, how do you tag
    >along without feeling excluded?


    In such a case, I guess if you cannot eat something 'good' for you -
    you either have to give it a miss or simply eat those dim sums or
    pastries. Sorry I don't have a solution for this one :\

    >Also, how do the aesthetics of portion control,
    >weighing and measuring intersect in your lives with spontaneity and sheer
    >pleasure in food? I look forward to some lively discussions.


    I don't find portion control is an issue for me in any way.

  3. #3
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    "Orlando Enrique Fiol" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ..
    > Hi all. Over the past few months, I'm beginning to come to terms with my
    > pre-
    > diabetes and have arrived at a number of troubling realizations. As I
    > survey
    > many of the usenet diabetes support groups, I find few foodies or people
    > for
    > whom food takes on largely aesthetic and cultural meanings. These folks
    > seem to
    > eat on the basis of science and health. In one exchange, I found myself
    > talking
    > to someone who never eats socially, who never goes to gatherings with the
    > express purpose of sharing food. Being totally blind, food is a huge
    > source of
    > pleasure and human connection in my life.
    >
    > How can I bridge the gap between what my body needs to eat and what I
    > enjoy as
    > a foodie?


    Strive for moderation - overindulgence will ultimately kill you.

    How do many of you strike this balance?

    If you hold back nothing there is nothing to look forward to. Understand
    the difference between hunger & appetite.




    If you're low-carbing and
    > your friends want to go out for dim sum or French pastries, how do you tag
    > along without feeling excluded?


    Don't exclude yourself go along and enjoy just don't do it every day. No
    diet is absolute,. Keep in mind a slip, is not the ruination of your diet.
    eat slower, listen more to your friends. The main purpose in that situation
    is not the food it's the friendship. Just shift your focus. easliy said but
    not easily done.



    Also, how do the aesthetics of portion control,
    > weighing and measuring intersect in your lives with spontaneity and sheer
    > pleasure in food?


    Hunger Vs appetite - have a slice of pie not the whole damn pie.

    Dimitri


  4. #4
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    "Orlando Enrique Fiol" wrote

    > Hi all. Over the past few months, I'm beginning to come to terms with my
    > pre-
    > diabetes and have arrived at a number of troubling realizations. As I
    > survey


    Any medically mandated diet shift is troublesome at the start.

    > many of the usenet diabetes support groups, I find few foodies or people
    > for
    > whom food takes on largely aesthetic and cultural meanings. These folks
    > seem to
    > eat on the basis of science and health. In one exchange, I found myself
    > talking


    At one time I checked such groups and found the adjustment of the set I was
    in, was to down-play food. There are surely groups that support foodies but
    I didn't find any. Here however, you will find us.

    > to someone who never eats socially, who never goes to gatherings with the
    > express purpose of sharing food. Being totally blind, food is a huge
    > source of
    > pleasure and human connection in my life.


    Then you need to preserve that. Your friends share a like desire for good
    food with the company. I'm part of a similar group (it's on Fidonet, not
    usenet) and several are diabetics. Well controlled diabetics who love
    cooking and sharing food.

    > How can I bridge the gap between what my body needs to eat and what I
    > enjoy as
    > a foodie? How do many of you strike this balance?


    Over *time* is the answer. In my cildhood I had to eat pretty much a
    diabetic-like diet. Hypoglycemia (a variation, genetic amd tracked for 5
    generations, was born with it). Once I moved out from home, I had to learn
    carefully *why* Mom only fed us certain things. Mom's a *wonderful person
    (just turned 80) but not really a foodie.

    That particular adaption was easy as I went back to childhood foods then
    slowly expanded to add more foods. I set a task to try 1 'new to me' thing
    each trip to the grocery store. It might be a new spice, or a veggie I'd
    never had. It was really easy at the start because I'd only experienced 4
    types of canned soups, had never had cabbage or squash (winter or summer).
    The only pork I had ever had was porkchops (fried to death and
    toothbreakingly hard) and bacon. Oh wait, she got sausages once in a blue
    moon (grin).

    Now, you've not had so limited of a set, but there are still going to be
    oodles of things you've never tried. You should get a glocose monitor if
    you havent already. The reason is you need to know what spikes *you* which
    may not be the same as what spikes another. The OP may think they have it
    all down pat and their advice is for you as well but that's not true. Do
    watch for that. Just understand that because *they* can't handle 1/2 cup
    rice, doesn't mean *you* can't. Glycemic indexes are just a guideline.
    Your own testing will show you where and what to portion control.

    You've got the obvious stuff. Watch the pastas and breads. Have small
    portions then test.

    I later found I have to cut fats and cholestrols because I run very high
    there so I had to adjust my eating. I did this over time, finding things I
    liked in the new items that replaced ones I shouldn't eat as much of. I am
    diet controlled for that now with testing every 6 months and eye-poppingly
    high on the 'good cholestrol'.

    Then, the hubby (who eats same meals happily) was found to need a salt
    reduced diet. AGG! We'd used salt as a flavor adjustment to a low sugar
    low fat diet for years. Again, it took *time* but we worked at it bit by
    bit and still are adjusting, finding new items that are reduced sodium that
    we *like*.

    > If you're low-carbing and
    > your friends want to go out for dim sum or French pastries, how do you tag
    > along without feeling excluded? Also, how do the aesthetics of portion
    > control,
    > weighing and measuring intersect in your lives with spontaneity and sheer
    > pleasure in food? I look forward to some lively discussions.


    Well, what my friends and I do, if we go out (instead of cooking in) is find
    a good spot that has something for all. A place that has dim sum will have
    other things such as garlic fried green beans with pork. The french pastry
    place may be a little harder but I've seen many have olive and cheese plates
    as appetizers.

    Think outside the box. If they have appetizers you can have, enjoy and
    share those about! Above all, try new things that are on the 'on list' for
    you. Like, I keep meaning to try an artichoke. It sounds right up my
    alley!

    Favorite comfort food? LOL! Japanese eggplant, washed and just sliced long
    then brushed with olive oil, bit of black pepper and (ok shoot me!) bacos.
    Bake at 350 until it's just starting to brown. Grin, allowable for both of
    us and you can use something better than bacos if you want to. Don BTW
    doesnt get the bacos (unless he steals on off mine or Charlotte's) but gets
    MS Dash and crumbled dried crunchy chile spiced baby shrimps.

    I've got tons of eggplant recipes using 'Japanese eggplant' (the long thin
    asian ones which need no peeling and are not bitter).


  5. #5
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    Orlando Enrique Fiol wrote:
    >
    > How can I bridge the gap between what my body needs to eat and what I enjoy as
    > a foodie? How do many of you strike this balance? If you're low-carbing and
    > your friends want to go out for dim sum or French pastries, how do you tag
    > along without feeling excluded?


    I'm wheat intolerant so I consistantly avoid wheat. I'm inconsistant
    about being a low carber. I find a lot more foodies among low carbers
    than among low fatters. Little wonder as fat makes food taste better.

    On my own I go for sauces and herbs on my veggies, cooking the same base
    ingredients with many different methods and flavorings. Books on low
    carb stress how luxurious the foods are and how easy portion control is
    when you have neither carb cravings nor fat cravings.

    Most restaurants have low carb items so I don't have troubles eating at
    meals. Any one place may get boring (Olive Garden's picata again) but
    rotating places handles that.

    At Sim Sum I have the fried greens, the root veggie patties they call
    Chinese turnip (high carb, low glycemic load) and dishes like shiu mai
    that are mostly meat and veggies with a small rice wrapper.

    A pastrie place? Ask if they have a soup or if they have a menu of
    meals or eat before going to the desert place. Some places are so
    specialized in high carb foods the answer is to work outside of their
    main products or just avoid the place.

  6. #6
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    cshenk <[email protected]> wrote:
    >At one time I checked such groups and found the adjustment of the set I was
    >in, was to down-play food. There are surely groups that support foodies but
    >I didn't find any. Here however, you will find us.


    I'm so very happy that I've brought this up right now because I really need
    foodie support from people who understand that a life without culinary pleasure
    is unacceptable. Many of these people openly admit that they no longer eat for
    pleasure. Even when I'm on the strictest phase of South Beach, I never
    relinquish my pleasure in food; I just switch the objects of my affection. I
    luxuriate in ricotta-based desserts, eggplant and bean dips with raw green
    peppers, grilled meat or seafood, etc. But, I just can't relate to people who
    think I should be perfectly prepared to give up all problematic foods without
    even mourning them.

    >Then you need to preserve that. Your friends share a like desire for good
    >food with the company. I'm part of a similar group (it's on Fidonet, not
    >usenet) and several are diabetics. Well controlled diabetics who love
    >cooking and sharing food.


    I wish I were part of a formalized group like that. (Shout out to anyone in the
    Philadelphia area who wants to eat sensibly and socially with me.)

    >Now, you've not had so limited of a set, but there are still going to be
    >oodles of things you've never tried. You should get a glocose monitor if
    >you havent already. The reason is you need to know what spikes *you* which
    >may not be the same as what spikes another. The OP may think they have it
    >all down pat and their advice is for you as well but that's not true. Do
    >watch for that. Just understand that because *they* can't handle 1/2 cup
    >rice, doesn't mean *you* can't. Glycemic indexes are just a guideline.
    >Your own testing will show you where and what to portion control.


    I'm very resistant to pricking my fingers multiple times a day and my doctor
    hasn't yet mandated testing. So, I'm just assuming I can't eat carbs often and
    getting used to that for now.

    >You've got the obvious stuff. Watch the pastas and breads. Have small
    >portions then test.


    I like your common sense approach.

    >Well, what my friends and I do, if we go out (instead of cooking in) is find
    >a good spot that has something for all. A place that has dim sum will have
    >other things such as garlic fried green beans with pork.


    Damn straight! And eggplant stuffed with shrimp, bean curd rolls, salads,
    turnip cakes, steamed meatballs, cold beef tendon, etc.

    >The french pastry place may be a little harder but I've seen many have olive

    and cheese plates as appetizers.

    Of course, but I'll probably want some pain au chocolat.

    >Think outside the box. If they have appetizers you can have, enjoy and
    >share those about! Above all, try new things that are on the 'on list' for
    >you. Like, I keep meaning to try an artichoke. It sounds right up my
    >alley!


    Too many leaves and not enough flesh.

    >Favorite comfort food? LOL! Japanese eggplant, washed and just sliced long
    >then brushed with olive oil, bit of black pepper and (ok shoot me!) bacos.
    >Bake at 350 until it's just starting to brown. Grin, allowable for both of
    >us and you can use something better than bacos if you want to. Don BTW
    >doesnt get the bacos (unless he steals on off mine or Charlotte's) but gets
    >MS Dash and crumbled dried crunchy chile spiced baby shrimps.


    Yumm! I'd probably use whole wheat bread crumbs or panko.

    >I've got tons of eggplant recipes using 'Japanese eggplant' (the long thin
    >asian ones which need no peeling and are not bitter).


    I love any kind of eggplant, anywhere, any time. So, feel free to email me your
    recipes.

    Thanks a lot,
    Orlando

  7. #7
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    Orlando Enrique Fiol wrote:
    > Hi all. Over the past few months, I'm beginning to come to terms with my pre-
    > diabetes and have arrived at a number of troubling realizations. As I survey
    > many of the usenet diabetes support groups, I find few foodies or people for
    > whom food takes on largely aesthetic and cultural meanings. These folks seem to
    > eat on the basis of science and health. In one exchange, I found myself talking
    > to someone who never eats socially, who never goes to gatherings with the
    > express purpose of sharing food. Being totally blind, food is a huge source of
    > pleasure and human connection in my life.



    That must have been that kook, Julie. The alt.food.diabetes group is her
    only source of socialization. She dropped in here for a while and got
    pummeled.

    > How can I bridge the gap between what my body needs to eat and what I enjoy as
    > a foodie? How do many of you strike this balance? If you're low-carbing and
    > your friends want to go out for dim sum or French pastries, how do you tag
    > along without feeling excluded? Also, how do the aesthetics of portion control,
    > weighing and measuring intersect in your lives with spontaneity and sheer
    > pleasure in food? I look forward to some lively discussions.


    If they are truly friends, they might consider having brunch at a place
    where everything isn't loaded with carbs, but if that's the only place
    you can go to, order stir-fried vegetables and forgo the dim sum. If you
    can't do that, take the fillings out of the dumplings and leave the
    dumpling stuff on the plate. There is no work-around for French pastry
    unless it's to eat 1/4 of one piece and drink a whole lot of coffee to
    be social. I have found that putting a pastry on a plate and cutting it
    into small pieces with a knife makes it easier to control portions.

    My DH is diabetic and we are very social people. We eat out with friends
    all the time and have learned some tricks. He always asks if he can
    substitute vegetables or a small salad for the rice, potato, pasta, etc.
    Even Mexican restaurants will have steamed veggies. If the only food
    is breaded and fried, he takes off the breading. I will order dessert
    and he will have a taste.

    We love to cruise and he often wants to sample something on the menu
    that a whole portion of would be dangerous so we do "taste and waste"
    He learned it from me as I don't finish deserts, I just taste them.

    Yes, there are people in the world who are starving, but they are no
    where near where we are wasting food. Sending a check to the local food
    bank eases our conscience.

    Good luck
    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  8. #8
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >That must have been that kook, Julie. The alt.food.diabetes group is her
    >only source of socialization. She dropped in here for a while and got
    >pummeled.


    I cannot tell a lie, you figured it out. But, there are others like her on that
    newsgroup, people who believe that low blood glucose numbers should be
    maintained at all times and all costs. I couldn't even gush about the insanely
    delicious Jamaican graduation party feast I attended last Sunday because I
    gorged on carbs and they condemned me for that. Thing is, I don't gorge that
    way but once every few months, and I'm careful to surround such meals with low-
    carb food and plenty of water.

    >If they are truly friends, they might consider having brunch at a place
    >where everything isn't loaded with carbs, but if that's the only place
    >you can go to, order stir-fried vegetables and forgo the dim sum. If you
    >can't do that, take the fillings out of the dumplings and leave the
    >dumpling stuff on the plate.


    Honestly, one dim sum meal will not damage me permanently. Diabetes management
    is all about what one does chronically. Anyone who isn't type 1 or in danger of
    going hypoglycemic can enjoy some occasional indulgences.

    >There is no work-around for French pastry
    >unless it's to eat 1/4 of one piece and drink a whole lot of coffee to
    >be social. I have found that putting a pastry on a plate and cutting it
    >into small pieces with a knife makes it easier to control portions.


    I just used that as an example. I haven't found any really awesome French
    bakeries in Philly anyway.

    >My DH is diabetic and we are very social people. We eat out with friends
    >all the time and have learned some tricks. He always asks if he can
    >substitute vegetables or a small salad for the rice, potato, pasta, etc.
    > Even Mexican restaurants will have steamed veggies. If the only food
    >is breaded and fried, he takes off the breading. I will order dessert
    >and he will have a taste.


    Is his diabetes so advanced that some breading will severely compromise his
    health? I don't want to become that obsessed with carbohydrate avoidance in
    situations where it makes no sense to do so.

    >We love to cruise and he often wants to sample something on the menu
    >that a whole portion of would be dangerous so we do "taste and waste"
    >He learned it from me as I don't finish deserts, I just taste them.


    I never waste; I share. *grin*

    >Yes, there are people in the world who are starving, but they are no
    >where near where we are wasting food. Sending a check to the local food
    >bank eases our conscience.


    You could also give it away or go out with more people who can share portions
    with you.

    Orlando

  9. #9
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    "Orlando Enrique Fiol" wrote
    > cshenk wrote:


    >>At one time I checked such groups and found the adjustment of the set I
    >>was
    >>in, was to down-play food. There are surely groups that support foodies
    >>but
    >>I didn't find any. Here however, you will find us.

    >
    > I'm so very happy that I've brought this up right now because I really
    > need
    > foodie support from people who understand that a life without culinary
    > pleasure
    > is unacceptable.


    A sad group and I left the few I found because I was looking specifically
    for good recipes even if I needed to adjust them for me. I instead went on
    my own culinary searches and found lots of things over time. Perhaps I can
    peel out some of the better ones for you to look over later.

    > Even when I'm on the strictest phase of South Beach, I never
    > relinquish my pleasure in food; I just switch the objects of my affection.
    > I


    Thats the way to do it. You have the skill set, now use it gently over
    time.

    >>Then you need to preserve that. Your friends share a like desire for good
    >>food with the company. I'm part of a similar group (it's on Fidonet, not
    >>usenet) and several are diabetics. Well controlled diabetics who love
    >>cooking and sharing food.

    >
    > I wish I were part of a formalized group like that. (Shout out to anyone
    > in the
    > Philadelphia area who wants to eat sensibly and socially with me.)


    Well ours is electronic and we live all over the world, but at least once a
    year as many of as can, gather in person for a 4-5 day long 'cook in'. This
    past year, it was on my porch. Since we are a mixed bag of dietary needs,
    we made sure that there were plenty of things various folks could eat, from
    pork free (one doesnt do pork) to diabetic (several need that) to low sodium
    (several again) to low carb for the dieters to high carb for the ones who
    want it.

    We started with one set *everyone* could eat. Live steamed blue crabs, cold
    old bay boiled shrimp, deep fried chilled breaded squid (sounds odd but it
    is delicious and a specialty of Don's), reduced sodium boiled peanuts (a
    delicate low sodium soy and cayenne pepper makes it work). I had some sort
    of veggies and some fruits too but forgot what. Lots of dipping sauces in
    little bowls everywhere. That way no traveller had to cook and there was
    enough all could find suitable. The following days were a blurr of 'stuff'
    made by my fellow foodies and if some of it I couldn't eat much of, I could
    still have a taste and go 'wow'.

    If you have one, invite me! You need only a kitchen and the willingness to
    let another use it. Umm, the others bring the food for cook in's but you'd
    be expected to have basics in normal single house amounts for impromptu use.
    Like a jar of mayo, a bit of mustard, black pepper, stuff you'd have
    already. I'm close enough to come up for a weekend (Norfolk area, about 5
    hours drive).

    >>Now, you've not had so limited of a set, but there are still going to be
    >>oodles of things you've never tried. You should get a glucose monitor if
    >>you havent already. The reason is you need to know what spikes *you*
    >>which
    >>may not be the same as what spikes another.


    > I'm very resistant to pricking my fingers multiple times a day and my
    > doctor
    > hasn't yet mandated testing. So, I'm just assuming I can't eat carbs often
    > and
    > getting used to that for now.


    Ok, the new ones aren't like the old ones though. I've been diet controlled
    so long, I don't use one either. I got to see a friend use them though on
    some of my dishes (weekend neighbor cookouts). Last time, to see if he
    spiked on a bean and bell pepper dish that tastes alot like baked beans in
    sweetness but with no added sugar. He can handle the beans in portion
    control but not the sugar such dishes normally have yet was pining for that
    old sweet bean taste. He didn't spike so now makes the recipe better than I
    do.

    >>You've got the obvious stuff. Watch the pastas and breads. Have small
    >>portions then test.


    > I like your common sense approach.


    Thats really all that is needed. I was a little mystified on how to get us
    from a high salt low sugar, low fat, low cholestrol diet to shift to low (or
    lower) salt but we did it. Not over night, but we did. Foodies who cook,
    can adjust. Best recipe developed on that hunt? How to make traditional
    salt boiled peanuts, in reduced sodium version *taste* the same and in this
    case, even *better*.

    >>Well, what my friends and I do, if we go out (instead of cooking in) is
    >>find
    >>a good spot that has something for all. A place that has dim sum will
    >>have
    >>other things such as garlic fried green beans with pork.

    >
    > Damn straight! And eggplant stuffed with shrimp, bean curd rolls, salads,
    > turnip cakes, steamed meatballs, cold beef tendon, etc.


    Exactly! I love the turnip cakes! Real good chance they have kamaboko on
    steamed mustard greens with ginger or at least the ones here do.

    >>The french pastry place may be a little harder but I've seen many have
    >>olive

    > and cheese plates as appetizers.
    >
    > Of course, but I'll probably want some pain au chocolat.


    Grin, might be the one place you want to avoid then.

    >>Think outside the box. If they have appetizers you can have, enjoy and
    >>share those about! Above all, try new things that are on the 'on list'
    >>for
    >>you. Like, I keep meaning to try an artichoke. It sounds right up my
    >>alley!


    > Too many leaves and not enough flesh.


    Might be, but I've never tried one. I found out that anything green and
    meant to be green, suits me except some of the stronger flavored USA greens
    like collards and beet greens.

    >>Favorite comfort food? LOL! Japanese eggplant, washed and just sliced
    >>long
    >>then brushed with olive oil, bit of black pepper and (ok shoot me!) bacos.
    >>Bake at 350 until it's just starting to brown. Grin, allowable for both
    >>of
    >>us and you can use something better than bacos if you want to. Don BTW
    >>doesnt get the bacos (unless he steals on off mine or Charlotte's) but
    >>gets
    >>MS Dash and crumbled dried crunchy chile spiced baby shrimps.

    >
    > Yumm! I'd probably use whole wheat bread crumbs or panko.


    Hey, a few crumbs are ok. Take a ritz cracker and mush it up in a baggie
    and that will do 2 halves pretty well for 'crunch' topping appeal.

    >>I've got tons of eggplant recipes using 'Japanese eggplant' (the long thin
    >>asian ones which need no peeling and are not bitter).

    >
    > I love any kind of eggplant, anywhere, any time. So, feel free to email me
    > your
    > recipes.


    Ah most of those are not exported just now but if your email isn't munged
    (mine isn't) I can toss some! Mostly that's the one thing I just freehand
    with no recipe. I'll put together a set of the more unique ones for you.


  10. #10
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    cshenk <[email protected]> wrote:
    >A sad group and I left the few I found because I was looking specifically
    >for good recipes even if I needed to adjust them for me. I instead went on
    >my own culinary searches and found lots of things over time. Perhaps I can
    >peel out some of the better ones for you to look over later.


    Probably after I finish comprehensive exams next week.

    >Thats the way to do it. You have the skill set, now use it gently over
    >time.


    I admit, those folks on ASD freaked me out. They want me to start testing right
    now and to immediately swear off any food that spikes my levels.

    >Well ours is electronic and we live all over the world, but at least once a
    >year as many of as can, gather in person for a 4-5 day long 'cook in'. This
    >past year, it was on my porch.


    I wouldn't mind it being on mine next year.

    >Since we are a mixed bag of dietary needs,
    >we made sure that there were plenty of things various folks could eat, from
    >pork free (one doesnt do pork) to diabetic (several need that) to low sodium
    >(several again) to low carb for the dieters to high carb for the ones who
    >want it.


    That's the spirit!

    >We started with one set *everyone* could eat. Live steamed blue crabs, cold
    >old bay boiled shrimp, deep fried chilled breaded squid (sounds odd but it
    >is delicious and a specialty of Don's), reduced sodium boiled peanuts (a
    >delicate low sodium soy and cayenne pepper makes it work). I had some sort
    >of veggies and some fruits too but forgot what. Lots of dipping sauces in
    >little bowls everywhere. That way no traveller had to cook and there was
    >enough all could find suitable.


    That squid does sound odd indeed. How does it stay crunchy while cold? Oh, the
    boiled peanuts appeal to me too.

    >The following days were a blurr of 'stuff'
    >made by my fellow foodies and if some of it I couldn't eat much of, I could
    >still have a taste and go 'wow'.


    Sometimes, that's exactly what I want to do.

    >If you have one, invite me! You need only a kitchen and the willingness to
    >let another use it. Umm, the others bring the food for cook in's but you'd
    >be expected to have basics in normal single house amounts for impromptu use.
    >Like a jar of mayo, a bit of mustard, black pepper, stuff you'd have
    >already. I'm close enough to come up for a weekend (Norfolk area, about 5
    >hours drive).


    Sure, whenever you want to come up, just let me know.

    >Ok, the new ones aren't like the old ones though. I've been diet controlled
    >so long, I don't use one either.


    Well, my last fasting level was 117, so I guess my diet isn't quite controlling
    it yet.

    >I got to see a friend use them though on
    >some of my dishes (weekend neighbor cookouts). Last time, to see if he
    >spiked on a bean and bell pepper dish that tastes alot like baked beans in
    >sweetness but with no added sugar. He can handle the beans in portion
    >control but not the sugar such dishes normally have yet was pining for that
    >old sweet bean taste. He didn't spike so now makes the recipe better than I
    >do.


    I love baked beans, but often find them too cloyingly sweet, so I'm very
    curious about this recipe.

    >Thats really all that is needed. I was a little mystified on how to get us
    >from a high salt low sugar, low fat, low cholestrol diet to shift to low (or
    >lower) salt but we did it. Not over night, but we did. Foodies who cook,
    >can adjust.


    I would think that foodies would be especially good at making things taste
    great with alternate ingredients or preparations.

    >Best recipe developed on that hunt? How to make traditional
    >salt boiled peanuts, in reduced sodium version *taste* the same and in this
    >case, even *better*.


    I believe you.

    >Exactly! I love the turnip cakes! Real good chance they have kamaboko on
    >steamed mustard greens with ginger or at least the ones here do.


    Here too. I pretty much love any Chinese greens.

    >Might be, but I've never tried one. I found out that anything green and
    >meant to be green, suits me except some of the stronger flavored USA greens
    >like collards and beet greens.


    Even those are fantastic when not cooked to death or underseasoned.

    >Hey, a few crumbs are ok. Take a ritz cracker and mush it up in a baggie
    >and that will do 2 halves pretty well for 'crunch' topping appeal.


    Yeah, anything crunchy with good crumb should do in that case.

    >Ah most of those are not exported just now but if your email isn't munged
    >(mine isn't) I can toss some! Mostly that's the one thing I just freehand
    >with no recipe. I'll put together a set of the more unique ones for you.


    I'll be emailing you shortly. I think I need to keep in regular touch with a
    like mind.

    Orlando

  11. #11
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    Orlando Enrique Fiol wrote:
    > Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:


    > Honestly, one dim sum meal will not damage me permanently. Diabetes management
    > is all about what one does chronically. Anyone who isn't type 1 or in danger of
    > going hypoglycemic can enjoy some occasional indulgences.


    I think that is something individuals have to decide for themselves.
    There is no standard person so there is no standard treatment or diet.
    "occasional indulgences" can affect some people. It will raise A1C numbers.

    >> My DH is diabetic and we are very social people. We eat out with friends
    >> all the time and have learned some tricks. He always asks if he can
    >> substitute vegetables or a small salad for the rice, potato, pasta, etc.
    >> Even Mexican restaurants will have steamed veggies. If the only food
    >> is breaded and fried, he takes off the breading. I will order dessert
    >> and he will have a taste.

    >
    > Is his diabetes so advanced that some breading will severely compromise his
    > health? I don't want to become that obsessed with carbohydrate avoidance in
    > situations where it makes no sense to do so.


    He has had it for 29 years. Fortunately, he has kept it under control so
    he doesn't have many of the side effects that some long-term diabetics
    have. He is on insulin via a pump because his pancreas just can't be
    tweaked any longer by drugs into producing enough insulin. It is not
    unusual to find long-term type 2s on insulin.

    You don't have to be as obsessed as some of those people (one in
    particular and you know who I mean) but the key to managing diabetes is
    watching carb intake. Since you are not doing finger sticks, it's
    impossible for you to know how carbohydrates are affecting your blood
    glucose. I suggested to you on the other group that you change doctors
    or see an endocrinologist. I think you have some misconceptions about
    the disease that require education. It is not possible to manage
    diabetes via Usenet newsgroups. You need to understand the disease and
    how it works.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    In article <MPG.26d408[email protected]>,
    Orlando Enrique Fiol <[email protected]> wrote:

    > How can I bridge the gap between what my body needs to eat and what I enjoy
    > as
    > a foodie? How do many of you strike this balance? If you're low-carbing and
    > your friends want to go out for dim sum or French pastries, how do you tag
    > along without feeling excluded?


    I long ago came to a compromise with this and discovered that eating for
    nutrition and pleasure were not that difficult. :-) I have insulin
    resistance as well and learned to live with it rather than have to face
    full type 2 diabetes.

    The secret is the paleo-style diet.

    Real foods, low carb, high fiber and protein.

    The most fascinating part of it is that I now eat a greater variety
    since my primary diet is no longer based around wheat, pasta and
    potatoes. Now it is mostly meat and leafy greens of various species,
    along with a small amount of whole grains like brown, red and wild rices
    along with a few root vegetables that mostly avoid potatoes.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    Only Irish coffee provides in a single glass all four essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar and fat. --Alex Levine

  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Je?us <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >Also, how do the aesthetics of portion control,
    > >weighing and measuring intersect in your lives with spontaneity and sheer
    > >pleasure in food? I look forward to some lively discussions.

    >
    > I don't find portion control is an issue for me in any way.


    Actually, I find that portion control with the "bad stuff" is one of the
    keys to the issue. ;-) YMMV of course!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    Only Irish coffee provides in a single glass all four essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar and fat. --Alex Levine

  14. #14
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Orlando Enrique Fiol <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > I'm so very happy that I've brought this up right now because I really need
    > foodie support from people who understand that a life without culinary
    > pleasure
    > is unacceptable. Many of these people openly admit that they no longer eat
    > for
    > pleasure. Even when I'm on the strictest phase of South Beach, I never
    > relinquish my pleasure in food; I just switch the objects of my affection. I
    > luxuriate in ricotta-based desserts, eggplant and bean dips with raw green
    > peppers, grilled meat or seafood, etc. But, I just can't relate to people who
    > think I should be perfectly prepared to give up all problematic foods without
    > even mourning them.


    Well stated! :-) Food is one of the few pleasures in life.

    Give it all up? I'd rather be six feet under...
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    Only Irish coffee provides in a single glass all four essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar and fat. --Alex Levine

  15. #15
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >You don't have to be as obsessed as some of those people (one in
    >particular and you know who I mean) but the key to managing diabetes is
    > watching carb intake.


    Which I generally do each and every day.

    >Since you are not doing finger sticks, it's
    >impossible for you to know how carbohydrates are affecting your blood
    >glucose.


    I get plenty of signs that tell me how carbs affect my blood glucose. Granted,
    these signs may not be as precise as numbers, but they still count.

    >I suggested to you on the other group that you change doctors
    >or see an endocrinologist. I think you have some misconceptions about
    >the disease that require education.


    Please feel free to email me privately to correct any misconceptions you think
    I have.

    >It is not possible to manage diabetes via Usenet newsgroups. You need to

    understand the disease and how it works.

    I think I understand this disease very well. My decision not to test yet should
    not be misinterpreted as lack of understanding.

    This exchange right here is the very kind I sought to avoid on RFC. I wanted to
    talk about the emotional and psychological ramifications of being a foodie on a
    special diet, of having to eat according to what your body needs rather than
    what your taste buds want. You've managed to transport the ASD discussion over
    here, which I did not want. It's common sense that carbs must be controlled
    when one has diabetes. Testing may give me a better handle on exactly which
    foods spike me and thus allow me to better tweak my diet. But, the inescapable
    truth remains.

    Orlando

  16. #16
    Orlando Enrique Fiol Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I long ago came to a compromise with this and discovered that eating for
    >nutrition and pleasure were not that difficult. :-) I have insulin
    >resistance as well and learned to live with it rather than have to face
    >full type 2 diabetes.


    I've been at that same compromise point for years.

    >The secret is the paleo-style diet.
    >Real foods, low carb, high fiber and protein.
    >The most fascinating part of it is that I now eat a greater variety
    >since my primary diet is no longer based around wheat, pasta and
    >potatoes. Now it is mostly meat and leafy greens of various species,
    >along with a small amount of whole grains like brown, red and wild rices
    >along with a few root vegetables that mostly avoid potatoes.


    You've pretty much described my diet. At home, it's no problem to eat this way.
    But when socializing, I'd like to eat more "normally".

    Orlando

  17. #17
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    Orlando Enrique Fiol wrote:
    >
    > This exchange right here is the very kind I sought to avoid on RFC. I wanted to
    > talk about the emotional and psychological ramifications of being a foodie on a
    > special diet, of having to eat according to what your body needs rather than
    > what your taste buds want.


    Part of that is an issue you mentioned in a different post in this
    thread:

    > But when socializing, I'd like to eat more "normally".


    At least you put the word "normally" in quotes. For you, any diabetic,
    anyone with insulin resistance or hypoglycemia or any low carber, it
    does not work to view sweets and starches as normal.

    Rich beats sweet. Savory beats starchy. Those are my normals since I
    started low carbing. (When I do adhere to my own plan. My adherence
    ranges from excellent to very poor over time). Those are foodie issues.

    Thinking as foodie you have not had problems doing rich and savory at
    home. At many restaurants it's a matter of reading the entire menu them
    picking items or doing a custom order.

    At desert places it's more about an attitude that sweet is poison. Some
    have options some don't. You can always have a coffee or tea and spend
    time waitching your friends eat poison.

  18. #18
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    "Omelet" wrote,
    > Orlando Enrique Fiol wrote:


    >> How can I bridge the gap between what my body needs to eat and what I
    >> enjoy
    >> as a foodie?


    > The most fascinating part of it is that I now eat a greater variety
    > since my primary diet is no longer based around wheat, pasta and
    > potatoes. Now it is mostly meat and leafy greens of various species,
    > along with a small amount of whole grains like brown, red and wild rices
    > along with a few root vegetables that mostly avoid potatoes.


    Although she is using different words, you can see a common thread here in
    'expand the diet'. I call it 'learn a new food you like and let it slowly
    and naturally be your choice'. Om probably doesnt think of it the same way
    but it seems she did a slow progression of replacement with things she likes
    and can have, for things she liked and can't have as much of anymore.



  19. #19
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    Orlando Enrique Fiol wrote:
    > Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> You don't have to be as obsessed as some of those people (one in
    >> particular and you know who I mean) but the key to managing diabetes is
    >> watching carb intake.

    >
    > Which I generally do each and every day.
    >
    >> Since you are not doing finger sticks, it's
    >> impossible for you to know how carbohydrates are affecting your blood
    >> glucose.

    >
    > I get plenty of signs that tell me how carbs affect my blood glucose. Granted,
    > these signs may not be as precise as numbers, but they still count.
    >
    >> I suggested to you on the other group that you change doctors
    >> or see an endocrinologist. I think you have some misconceptions about
    >> the disease that require education.

    >
    > Please feel free to email me privately to correct any misconceptions you think
    > I have.
    >
    >> It is not possible to manage diabetes via Usenet newsgroups. You need to

    > understand the disease and how it works.
    >
    > I think I understand this disease very well. My decision not to test yet should
    > not be misinterpreted as lack of understanding.
    >
    > This exchange right here is the very kind I sought to avoid on RFC. I wanted to
    > talk about the emotional and psychological ramifications of being a foodie on a
    > special diet, of having to eat according to what your body needs rather than
    > what your taste buds want. You've managed to transport the ASD discussion over
    > here, which I did not want. It's common sense that carbs must be controlled
    > when one has diabetes. Testing may give me a better handle on exactly which
    > foods spike me and thus allow me to better tweak my diet. But, the inescapable
    > truth remains.
    >


    I'm sorry you feel that I "hijacked" your thread, but your statements
    that it's okay to indulge yourself in high carb foods because once in a
    while doesn't hurt is just not true. That's where I believe you need
    education. Diabetes is a nasty disease and inventing your own management
    program can lead to trouble down the road.

    Of course if you want to remain in denial, it's no skin off of my back.


    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  20. #20
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: foodies on special diets

    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Omelet" wrote,
    >> Orlando Enrique Fiol wrote:

    >
    >>> How can I bridge the gap between what my body needs to eat and what
    >>> I enjoy
    >>> as a foodie?

    >
    >> The most fascinating part of it is that I now eat a greater variety
    >> since my primary diet is no longer based around wheat, pasta and
    >> potatoes. Now it is mostly meat and leafy greens of various species,
    >> along with a small amount of whole grains like brown, red and wild
    >> rices along with a few root vegetables that mostly avoid potatoes.

    >
    > Although she is using different words, you can see a common thread
    > here in 'expand the diet'. I call it 'learn a new food you like and
    > let it slowly and naturally be your choice'. Om probably doesnt think
    > of it the same way but it seems she did a slow progression of
    > replacement with things she likes and can have, for things she liked
    > and can't have as much of anymore.



    When gout reared it's ugly head in 2007, I got offered Alopurinol to
    keep me on my typical food path. Trouble with my typical food path is it
    made me fat so I decided to omit those foods to alleviate gout and lose
    weight at the same time instead.

    That and with high blood pressure (low sodium) combined, further reduced
    my choices.

    Envision a two combination lock to a food safe for what's safe to eat!

    Andy

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