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Thread: The Food of a Younger Land

  1. #1
    bulka Guest

    Default The Food of a Younger Land

    A new book - stuff harvested from the WPA's America Eats project.
    Very mixed. Not useful, but interesting.

    "The recipies contained in this book are to be followed exactly as
    written. The publisher is not responsible for your specific health or
    allergy needs that may require medical supervision."

  2. #2
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: The Food of a Younger Land

    bulka wrote:
    > A new book - stuff harvested from the WPA's America Eats project.
    > Very mixed. Not useful, but interesting.
    >
    > "The recipies contained in this book are to be followed exactly as
    > written. The publisher is not responsible for your specific health or
    > allergy needs that may require medical supervision."


    I really enjoyed that book!!! I have since read one realted book
    and will order it and another related book. A good follow-on to
    this, with recipes, is America Cooks by The Browns. In order to
    aid your search, "The Browns" are Cora, Rose, and Bob.

    --
    Jean B.

  3. #3
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: The Food of a Younger Land

    On Jul 25, 7:31 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    > bulka wrote:
    > > A new book - stuff harvested from the WPA's America Eats project.
    > > Very mixed. Not useful, but interesting.

    >
    > > "The recipies contained in this book are to be followed exactly as
    > > written. The publisher is not responsible for your specific health or
    > > allergy needs that may require medical supervision."

    >
    > I really enjoyed that book!!! I have since read one realted book
    > and will order it and another related book. A good follow-on to
    > this, with recipes, is America Cooks by The Browns. In order to
    > aid your search, "The Browns" are Cora, Rose, and Bob.
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.


    I'm about hafway through, into The South Eats. I start to notice the
    references to canned tomatoes, canned corn, ketchup, oleo. Even one
    recipie for barbecue sauce, the main ingredient being three bottles of
    barbecue sauce.

    What happened to my fantasy that there used to be real food here.
    This is what? 1940? Pre-interstate highways. And folks are already
    buying food from factories. There are stories about home hog
    butchering, as if it were something we all did, a then a recipie for
    okra gumbo with canned vegetables.

    I'm overreacting. I'll assume they mean home-canned. Probably too
    much trouble to make (or spell) Worcestershire sauce down to the
    farm. The pieces are a mishmash of contemporay reports, reprints,
    interviews with the old folks, rural and urban, so the chronology and
    geography can get a litte confusing. Plenty of excuses and reasons
    explanations for me to be wrong.

    Still, I'm a cranky, cynical romantic, and bristle at seeing catsup in
    a recipie.

    Love

  4. #4
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: The Food of a Younger Land

    bulka wrote:
    > On Jul 25, 7:31 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >> bulka wrote:
    >>> A new book - stuff harvested from the WPA's America Eats project.
    >>> Very mixed. Not useful, but interesting.
    >>> "The recipies contained in this book are to be followed exactly as
    >>> written. The publisher is not responsible for your specific health or
    >>> allergy needs that may require medical supervision."

    >> I really enjoyed that book!!! I have since read one realted book
    >> and will order it and another related book. A good follow-on to
    >> this, with recipes, is America Cooks by The Browns. In order to
    >> aid your search, "The Browns" are Cora, Rose, and Bob.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jean B.

    >
    > I'm about hafway through, into The South Eats. I start to notice the
    > references to canned tomatoes, canned corn, ketchup, oleo. Even one
    > recipie for barbecue sauce, the main ingredient being three bottles of
    > barbecue sauce.
    >
    > What happened to my fantasy that there used to be real food here.
    > This is what? 1940? Pre-interstate highways. And folks are already
    > buying food from factories. There are stories about home hog
    > butchering, as if it were something we all did, a then a recipie for
    > okra gumbo with canned vegetables.
    >
    > I'm overreacting. I'll assume they mean home-canned. Probably too
    > much trouble to make (or spell) Worcestershire sauce down to the
    > farm. The pieces are a mishmash of contemporay reports, reprints,
    > interviews with the old folks, rural and urban, so the chronology and
    > geography can get a litte confusing. Plenty of excuses and reasons
    > explanations for me to be wrong.
    >
    > Still, I'm a cranky, cynical romantic, and bristle at seeing catsup in
    > a recipie.
    >
    > Love


    Those canned things, even if not home-canned, are still pretty
    minor compared to what we have now. That BBQ sauce, though...

    You know, if you want to continue with this, you can find Algren's
    completed write-up. Also Pat Willard wrote a book based on the
    same archives. I got both through inter-library loan and then
    decided to buy them.

    --
    Jean B.

  5. #5
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: The Food of a Younger Land

    On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 09:04:15 -0400, Jean B. wrote:

    > bulka wrote:
    >> On Jul 25, 7:31 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:

    >
    > Those canned things, even if not home-canned, are still pretty
    > minor compared to what we have now. That BBQ sauce, though...
    >
    > You know, if you want to continue with this, you can find Algren's
    > completed write-up. Also Pat Willard wrote a book based on the
    > same archives. I got both through inter-library loan and then
    > decided to buy them.


    the inter-library loan system is one of the coolest things ever. it's
    amazing the things they can get for you.

    your pal,
    blake

  6. #6
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: The Food of a Younger Land

    On Jul 28, 1:07 pm, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 09:04:15 -0400, Jean B. wrote:
    > > bulka wrote:
    > >> On Jul 25, 7:31 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:

    >
    > > Those canned things, even if not home-canned, are still pretty
    > > minor compared to what we have now. That BBQ sauce, though...

    >
    > > You know, if you want to continue with this, you can find Algren's
    > > completed write-up. Also Pat Willard wrote a book based on the
    > > same archives. I got both through inter-library loan and then
    > > decided to buy them.

    >
    > the inter-library loan system is one of the coolest things ever. it's
    > amazing the things they can get for you.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    The one thing this book could use is a glossary, or footnotes. There
    are a lot of terms for ingredients or techniques or measurements that
    are either local, idiosyncratic, slang,or just out dated that I don't
    understand (or maybe I just stoopid). What work Kurlansky did here, I
    think it is more for historical, anthropological, annecdotal interest,
    than for someone who could get a picture by reading a recipie. A few
    hundred lines of interperetive deffinitions would fix that.

    BTW, I loved the Depression Pie essay (towards the end of Far West).
    She's my idea of a cook!

    And, thanks for the refs., Jean. I'll hit the inter-library. That's
    my MO, too - read it for free, then, while I'm waiting for it to come
    out in paper or find it on sale, I'll be able to think over whether if
    I really need it. Anti-impulse buying.

    B

  7. #7
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: The Food of a Younger Land

    blake murphy wrote:
    > On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 09:04:15 -0400, Jean B. wrote:
    >
    >> bulka wrote:
    >>> On Jul 25, 7:31 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:

    >> Those canned things, even if not home-canned, are still pretty
    >> minor compared to what we have now. That BBQ sauce, though...
    >>
    >> You know, if you want to continue with this, you can find Algren's
    >> completed write-up. Also Pat Willard wrote a book based on the
    >> same archives. I got both through inter-library loan and then
    >> decided to buy them.

    >
    > the inter-library loan system is one of the coolest things ever. it's
    > amazing the things they can get for you.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    Yes, and if the first level doesn't have what you want, you (or at
    least I) can expand the search. And if that fails, the librarians
    have other resources.

    --
    Jean B.

  8. #8
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: The Food of a Younger Land

    bulka wrote:
    > On Jul 28, 1:07 pm, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 09:04:15 -0400, Jean B. wrote:
    >>> bulka wrote:
    >>>> On Jul 25, 7:31 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >>> Those canned things, even if not home-canned, are still pretty
    >>> minor compared to what we have now. That BBQ sauce, though...
    >>> You know, if you want to continue with this, you can find Algren's
    >>> completed write-up. Also Pat Willard wrote a book based on the
    >>> same archives. I got both through inter-library loan and then
    >>> decided to buy them.

    >> the inter-library loan system is one of the coolest things ever. it's
    >> amazing the things they can get for you.
    >>
    >> your pal,
    >> blake

    >
    > The one thing this book could use is a glossary, or footnotes. There
    > are a lot of terms for ingredients or techniques or measurements that
    > are either local, idiosyncratic, slang,or just out dated that I don't
    > understand (or maybe I just stoopid). What work Kurlansky did here, I
    > think it is more for historical, anthropological, annecdotal interest,
    > than for someone who could get a picture by reading a recipie. A few
    > hundred lines of interperetive deffinitions would fix that.
    >
    > BTW, I loved the Depression Pie essay (towards the end of Far West).
    > She's my idea of a cook!
    >
    > And, thanks for the refs., Jean. I'll hit the inter-library. That's
    > my MO, too - read it for free, then, while I'm waiting for it to come
    > out in paper or find it on sale, I'll be able to think over whether if
    > I really need it. Anti-impulse buying.
    >
    > B


    I also do that with fiction. I will, with few exceptions, get the
    book from the library. Then I will buy it only if it is something
    meritorious, which I will want to read again. In fact, I am
    looking forward to reading my stash of books that I have already
    read and enjoyed.

    --
    Jean B.

  9. #9
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: The Food of a Younger Land

    On Jul 27, 11:02*pm, bulka <working.artists.work...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jul 25, 7:31 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >
    > > bulka wrote:
    > > > A new book - stuff harvested from the WPA's America Eats project.
    > > > Very mixed. *Not useful, but interesting.

    >
    > > > "The recipies contained in this book are to be followed exactly as
    > > > written. *The publisher is not responsible for your specific healthor
    > > > allergy needs that may require medical supervision."

    >
    > > I really enjoyed that book!!! *I have since read one realted book
    > > and will order it and another related book. *A good follow-on to
    > > this, with recipes, is America Cooks by The Browns. *In order to
    > > aid your search, "The Browns" are Cora, Rose, and Bob.

    >
    > > --
    > > Jean B.

    >
    > I'm about hafway through, into The South Eats. *I start to notice the
    > references to canned tomatoes, canned corn, ketchup, oleo. *Even one
    > recipie for barbecue sauce, the main ingredient being three bottles of
    > barbecue sauce.
    >
    > What happened to my fantasy that there used to be real food here.
    > This is what? 1940? *Pre-interstate highways. *And folks are already
    > buying food from factories. *There are stories about home hog
    > butchering, as if it were something we all did, a then a recipie for
    > okra gumbo with canned vegetables.
    >
    > I'm overreacting. *I'll assume they mean home-canned. *Probably too
    > much trouble to make (or spell) Worcestershire sauce down to the
    > farm. *The pieces are a mishmash of contemporay reports, reprints,
    > interviews with the old folks, rural and urban, so the chronology and
    > geography can get a litte confusing. *Plenty of excuses and reasons
    > explanations for me to be wrong.
    >
    > Still, I'm a cranky, cynical romantic, and bristle at seeing catsup in
    > a recipie.
    >
    > Love


    Many of the "factory" foods you are having a problem with (referring
    to the 40s) are in those recipe books because they were so new, and
    such a novelty, that people really wanted to try them out and find
    good uses for them. It was just the times, not a total indication of
    what America was eating the majority of the time.

    N.

  10. #10
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: The Food of a Younger Land

    On Wed, 29 Jul 2009 11:03:11 -0400, Jean B. wrote:

    > blake murphy wrote:
    >> On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 09:04:15 -0400, Jean B. wrote:
    >>
    >>> bulka wrote:
    >>>> On Jul 25, 7:31 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >>> Those canned things, even if not home-canned, are still pretty
    >>> minor compared to what we have now. That BBQ sauce, though...
    >>>
    >>> You know, if you want to continue with this, you can find Algren's
    >>> completed write-up. Also Pat Willard wrote a book based on the
    >>> same archives. I got both through inter-library loan and then
    >>> decided to buy them.

    >>
    >> the inter-library loan system is one of the coolest things ever. it's
    >> amazing the things they can get for you.
    >>
    >> your pal,
    >> blake

    >
    > Yes, and if the first level doesn't have what you want, you (or at
    > least I) can expand the search. And if that fails, the librarians
    > have other resources.


    the thought strikes me that the librarians i've known - unlike say, tech
    assistance guys or retail people - never throw up their hands say 'sorry, i
    can't help you.' a dogged bunch for sure.

    your pal,
    blake

  11. #11
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: The Food of a Younger Land

    blake murphy wrote:
    > On Wed, 29 Jul 2009 11:03:11 -0400, Jean B. wrote:
    >
    >> blake murphy wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 09:04:15 -0400, Jean B. wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> bulka wrote:
    >>>>> On Jul 25, 7:31 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >>>> Those canned things, even if not home-canned, are still pretty
    >>>> minor compared to what we have now. That BBQ sauce, though...
    >>>>
    >>>> You know, if you want to continue with this, you can find Algren's
    >>>> completed write-up. Also Pat Willard wrote a book based on the
    >>>> same archives. I got both through inter-library loan and then
    >>>> decided to buy them.
    >>> the inter-library loan system is one of the coolest things ever. it's
    >>> amazing the things they can get for you.
    >>>
    >>> your pal,
    >>> blake

    >> Yes, and if the first level doesn't have what you want, you (or at
    >> least I) can expand the search. And if that fails, the librarians
    >> have other resources.

    >
    > the thought strikes me that the librarians i've known - unlike say, tech
    > assistance guys or retail people - never throw up their hands say 'sorry, i
    > can't help you.' a dogged bunch for sure.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    Now that you mention it, that's true, isn't it?

    --
    Jean B.

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