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Thread: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

  1. #1
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    By Ian Fisher

    International Herald Tribune

    ROME: Last month, Gambero Rosso, the prestigious reviewer of restaurants
    and wine, sought out Rome's best carbonara, a dish of pasta, eggs,
    pecorino cheese and guanciale (which is cured pig cheek; pancetta, for
    aficionados, is not done) that defines tradition here.

    In second place was L'Arcangelo, a restaurant with an Indian head chef.
    The winner: Antico Forno Roscioli, a bakery and innovative restaurant
    whose chef, Nabil Hadj Hassen, arrived from Tunisia at 17 and washed
    dishes for a year and a half before he cooked his first pot of pasta.

    "To cook is a passion," said Hassen, now 43, who went on to train with
    some of Italy's top chefs. "Food is a beautiful thing."

    Spoken like an Italian. But while the world learned about pasta and
    pizza from poor Italian immigrants, now it is foreigners, many of them
    also poor, who make some of the best Italian food in Italy (as well as
    some of the worst and everything between).

    With Italians increasingly shunning sweaty and underpaid kitchen work,
    it can be hard now to find a restaurant where at least one foreigner
    does not wash dishes, help in the kitchen or, as is often the case,
    actually cook. Egyptians have done well as pizza makers, but restaurant
    kitchens are now a snapshot of Italy's relatively recent immigrant
    experience, with Moroccans, Tunisians, Romanians and Bangladeshis all
    doing the work.

    The fact itself may not be surprising: On one level, restaurants in
    Italy, a country that even into the 1970s exported more workers than it
    brought in, now more closely mirror immigrant-staffed kitchens in much
    of Europe.

    But Italians take their food very seriously, not just as nourishment and
    pleasure but as a chief component of national and regional identity. And
    so any change is not taken lightly here, especially when the questions
    it raises are uncomfortable: Will Italy's food change - and if so, for
    the worse or, even more disconcerting, for the better? Most Italian food
    is defined by its good ingredients and simple preparation, but does it
    become less distinct - or less Italian - if anyone can prepare it to
    restaurant standards? Does that come at some cost to national pride?

    "If he is an Egyptian cook, nothing changes - nothing," said Francesco
    Sabatini, 75, co-owner of Sabatini in Trastevere, one of the oldest
    neighborhoods in Rome. His restaurant is considered one of the city's
    most conservative, serving classic Roman dishes like oxtail, yet 7 of
    his 10 cooks are not Italian.

    For Sabatini, the issue is not who cooks but the training - his chefs
    apprentice for five years - and keeping alive Italy's culinary
    traditions, which he defines as "the flavors of your mother's kitchen."

    "That's why I'm here," he said. "If not, I'd just go to the beach."

    But in a debate likely to grow in the coming years, others argue that
    foreign chefs can mimic Italian food but not really understand it.

    "Tradition is needed to go forward with Italian youngsters, not
    foreigners," said Loriana Bianchi, co-owner of La Canonica, a restaurant
    also in Trastevere, which employs several Bangladeshis, though she does
    the cooking. "It's not racism, but culture."

    While much of Italy's best food is prepared at home, Bianchi despairs at
    the difficulty of finding people to do the same in restaurants. (There
    is even a greater shortage, experts say, of Italian waiters.) "It's
    tiring, and the hours are very long," she said.

    But it has been an undeniable boon to Italy's new immigrants.

    Twelve years ago, Abu Markhyyeh, a young Jordanian, finished an
    apprenticeship with a Neapolitan pizza maker, borrowed money from his
    Italian mother-in-law, then opened his own pizzeria in Milan, Da Willy,
    after his nickname here.

    He did well, in part because he made the pizzas bigger but kept the
    prices low. Now Markhyyeh, 41, presides over an untraditional pizza
    empire. He has 11 restaurants in Milan, four in Jordan, two in Cyprus
    and franchises in Dubai; Beirut; Sharm el Sheik, Egypt; and now in
    Shanghai.

    Despite this success - and thousands of loyal Italian customers - he
    said he never felt fully accepted. "Italians say they aren't racist, but
    then they say to me that in Milan I have found America," he said,
    referring to a slightly insulting expression for finding success without
    really working for it. "It makes me feel lousy."

    Qunfeng Zhu, 30, a Chinese immigrant who opened a coffee bar in Rome's
    center, has had a similar experience even though he makes an authentic
    espresso in a classic Italian atmosphere (overlooking a few bottles of
    Chinese liquor).

    "Some people come in, see we are Chinese and go away," he said.

    But in the last few years, he said, that happens less frequently, one
    sign that Italy is opening up - if slowly - to other kinds of food.
    Twenty years ago it was hard to find anything beyond the odd Chinese
    restaurant. Now the choices are broader, especially for Asian food like
    Japanese or Indian.

    "We live in a globalized society - there are so many people represented
    in our city," said Maria Coscia, the commissioner of Rome's public
    schools. So much so that last year the city began a program of serving a
    meal from different countries once a month. But many parents complained
    loudly.

    "The first time we did it, the menu was Bangladeshi," she said. "That
    was a problem."

    As a result of the complaints, the program was tweaked slightly and now
    at least one dish in four on those days - even grade-school students eat
    well in Italy - will remain Italian. Now the program is largely
    accepted, though its Web site includes this reminder for those still
    wary, "In the total of the 210 school days, when lunches are served,
    only 8 days are dedicated to the menus from other countries."

    With this mixing of cultures only in its early days, there seems to be
    no major shift in Italian cuisine, even if foreigners are doing the
    cooking more and more often. Unlike in France, where foreign flavors
    have blended well over time with native ones, attempts here at some
    fusion of Italian and other cuisines have not caught on. There is, as
    yet, no equivalent to curry in Britain.

    Still, there seems to be some leakage. Food experts say that foreign
    chefs, here and there, add spices not often used in Italy, like
    coriander and cumin. Couscous and vanilla are no longer novelties.

    But there is a question as to whether these changes, so far subtle, are
    happening as a conscious effort to be creative, or simply reflect that
    foreign chefs are reverting to the flavors they know from home.

    Pierluigi Roscioli, a member of the family that runs the restaurant that
    won the best-carbonara award, said there was a risk that tradition would
    slowly erode if Italian chefs did note oversee those foreign ones who
    have had less training.

    "Without supervision, they tend to drift toward what is in their DNA,"
    Roscioli said. "When it's by choice, it's great, but not when it happens
    because someone isn't paying attention."

    Given the current pace of change, he and other experts estimate that
    cooks in low- to middle-level restaurants in Italy may be almost
    entirely non-Italian within a decade. But this trend coincides with
    another, in which Italians are showing a rejuvenated interest in the
    best of their own food, as shown by the popularity of groups like
    Gambero Rosso, which publishes a magazine and books reviewing wine and
    restaurants, and the Slow Food movement, which emphasizes fresh and
    local products.

    Four years ago, the International School of Italian Cooking opened in
    Parma, arguably Italy's best food city, and is attracting a new
    generation of Italian chefs more interested in high-end cooking than the
    home-style cooking in local restaurants that has made Italian food
    popular around the world.

    Its executive manager, Andrea Sinigaglia, said it was possible that
    Italian restaurants would soon divide into two camps, with elite
    restaurants staffed by Italian chefs and trattorias and restaurants
    aimed more at tourists run by foreign chefs.

    But with Italy changing, he said, its food will inevitably change, too,
    though his school is partly aimed at keeping the basics - local
    products, fresh ingredients, simplicity in preparation - intact.

    "We cannot defend a recipe," he said. "We cannot stop progress. We can
    indicate, pinpoint, what are the real important things. And the rest is
    creativity."

  2. #2
    Edwin Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?


    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Spoken like an Italian. But while the world learned about pasta and
    > pizza from poor Italian immigrants, now it is foreigners, many of them
    > also poor, who make some of the best Italian food in Italy (as well as
    > some of the worst and everything between).
    >
    > With Italians increasingly shunning sweaty and underpaid kitchen work,
    > it can be hard now to find a restaurant where at least one foreigner
    > does not wash dishes, help in the kitchen or, as is often the case,
    > actually cook. Egyptians have done well as pizza makers, but restaurant
    > kitchens are now a snapshot of Italy's relatively recent immigrant
    > experience, with Moroccans, Tunisians, Romanians and Bangladeshis all
    > doing the work.
    >


    While I did not take a census at the places we ate at, there was definitely
    a lot of non-Italian kitchen help in places we went to. Seemed more so in
    the larger cities than the small town, but give it time. It has to have
    some effect long term.



  3. #3
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    On Apr 8, 2:58*pm, azaze...@koroviev.de (Victor Sack) wrote:
    > * * * * Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?
    >

    Interesting mixture of attitudes, from rational to cultural to DNA
    (!). Here in the U.S. in most parts of the country, most kitchens
    draw their staffs from immigrant communities because it's hard, hot,
    sweaty, demanding, low-paying work. But at its best it's a
    meritocracy and talented people rise from dishwasher to chef. The
    notion that any country's food needs to be cooked by natives of that
    country wouldn't have much traction here. -aem

  4. #4
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:1if3q42.1gbo7i8y44v7oN%[email protected]. .
    > Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?


    Eccomi!

    It's a struggle to get Italians to believe you can cook Italian if you
    aren't, and they often tell you that you MUST have Italian blood if you are
    good. The best restaurant cook in my city is Filipina and has worked here
    20 years-- 17 under Italian chefs and 3 in her own restaurant. She
    struggles to stay open, but her food is undeniably lighter and brighter
    versions of the local food and it is delightful.

    I had cooked since I was 6 years old when I went to culinary schol here.
    When I started working I made stiffer rules for myself, like testing each
    new recipe 5 times and the last time the tasters had to be Italians. I
    cooked for Italian friends all the time, but Italians never hired me. One
    excitedly told me I was a great cook, not just for a foreigner but even
    against Italian cooks. I still laugh.

    This year I have been hired by Italians, though. Five years to get the
    first euro from an Italian!

    Foreigners have to be super-traditonalists until they get famous. If you
    start adding anything from your own cuisine to theirs you can expect
    accusations. Only famous Italians are allowed to make radical dishes and
    new flavors. The wok is absolutely ideal for tossing pasta into sauces, but
    don't let an Italian see you do it. Tabasco, considered Mexican here, by
    the drop lifts stodgy egg dishes to new heights, but don't let them know you
    did it.

    Italians are highly suspicious of foreign food and there is strong official
    support for it. To many Italians foreign food can include dishes from the
    next region over, or even from a nearby town. There is a good dish from
    Lake Trasimeno, thirty miles from here, that only I make. They like it, but
    they only eat it at a fall festival when the restaurants make it or at my
    table.

    Will it change? Sure. But slower than anywhere else I know, because the
    most common question to travel agents in Italy is "Do they have Italian food
    there?"



  5. #5
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?



    "aem" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    On Apr 8, 2:58 pm, azaze...@koroviev.de (Victor Sack) wrote:
    > Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?
    >

    Interesting mixture of attitudes, from rational to cultural to DNA
    (!). Here in the U.S. in most parts of the country, most kitchens
    draw their staffs from immigrant communities because it's hard, hot,
    sweaty, demanding, low-paying work. But at its best it's a
    meritocracy and talented people rise from dishwasher to chef. The
    notion that any country's food needs to be cooked by natives of that
    country wouldn't have much traction here. -aem

    Italian kids don't want to work for the low pay, either. I hire assistants
    easily because I pay from euro 7.50 to 10 per hour from the local cooking
    school and that's more than anyone else will pay.

    The euro 100,000 a year chef is a daydream here. There are very few. A
    lucky chef opens a small restaurant and makes a go of it and when he's ready
    to retire he finds a buyer and other than a moderate living, that's his
    whole profit. Most of Italy is small places, not big cities.



  6. #6
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The wok is absolutely ideal for tossing pasta into sauces, but
    > don't let an Italian see you do it.


    Here is a dish suitable for finishing in the wok. The recipe is from
    _Traditional Recipes from Florence_ by Carla Geri Camporesi.

    Victor

    Penne pasta from the pan

    400 g (16 oz) pasta "penne" type
    200 g (8 oz) lean red minced meat
    100 g (4 oz) bacon
    2 chicken livers
    2 carrots
    1 stick of celery
    1 small onion
    a little parsley
    400 g (16 oz) peeled tomatoes
    30 g (1 oz) butter
    extra virgin olive oil
    1 glass red wine
    salt and pepper

    Mix together very finely chopped flavouring herbs and vegetables and
    brown gently in four tablespoonfuls of oil and 30 g (1 oz) butter. When
    they are brown, add the meat, bacon and chicken livers, all previously
    minced, and brown these very gently. Pour in the wine and let it
    evaporate. Add the peeled tomatoes and cook it all on a moderate heat.
    Boil the pasta until cooked but not soft ("al dente"), and then drain.
    Transfer the cooked pasta, together with the sauce into a sufficiently
    large pan. Sauté it all for two minutes over a good heat and then tip
    the steaming hot "penne" on to a serving dish.

  7. #7
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:1if5mi0.199nodm14fgkaoN%[email protected] ..
    > Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The wok is absolutely ideal for tossing pasta into sauces, but
    >> don't let an Italian see you do it.

    >
    > Here is a dish suitable for finishing in the wok. The recipe is from
    > _Traditional Recipes from Florence_ by Carla Geri Camporesi.
    >
    > Victor
    >
    > Penne pasta from the pan
    >
    > 400 g (16 oz) pasta "penne" type
    > 200 g (8 oz) lean red minced meat
    > 100 g (4 oz) bacon
    > 2 chicken livers
    > 2 carrots
    > 1 stick of celery
    > 1 small onion
    > a little parsley
    > 400 g (16 oz) peeled tomatoes
    > 30 g (1 oz) butter
    > extra virgin olive oil
    > 1 glass red wine
    > salt and pepper


    What happened? You got partway to ragù and fell off the edge.



  8. #8
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> ha scritto
    > >
    > > Here is a dish suitable for finishing in the wok. The recipe is from
    > > _Traditional Recipes from Florence_ by Carla Geri Camporesi.
    > >
    > > Penne pasta from the pan

    >
    > What happened? You got partway to ragù and fell off the edge.


    The way from Florence to Bologna is long enough.

    Here is another, very similar recipe:
    <http://ricette.leonardo.it/ricetta_rigatoni_alla_fiorentina_1017.html>.

    Victor

  9. #9
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:1if7etl.bdzftbx26jcuN%[email protected]..
    > Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> ha scritto
    >> >
    >> > Here is a dish suitable for finishing in the wok. The recipe is from
    >> > _Traditional Recipes from Florence_ by Carla Geri Camporesi.
    >> >
    >> > Penne pasta from the pan

    >>
    >> What happened? You got partway to ragù and fell off the edge.

    >
    > The way from Florence to Bologna is long enough.
    >
    > Here is another, very similar recipe:
    > <http://ricette.leonardo.it/ricetta_rigatoni_alla_fiorentina_1017.html>.
    >
    > Victor


    That's a protected site unavailable to the unwashed masses. Don't need it
    today, though, because I am making tagliatelle ai carciofi con spicchi di
    Pecorino affumicato.



  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    On Fri, 11 Apr 2008 11:56:37 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Victor Sack" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >news:1if7etl.bdzftbx26jcuN%[email protected]. .
    >> Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> ha scritto
    >>> >
    >>> > Here is a dish suitable for finishing in the wok. The recipe is from
    >>> > _Traditional Recipes from Florence_ by Carla Geri Camporesi.
    >>> >
    >>> > Penne pasta from the pan
    >>>
    >>> What happened? You got partway to ragù and fell off the edge.

    >>
    >> The way from Florence to Bologna is long enough.
    >>
    >> Here is another, very similar recipe:
    >> <http://ricette.leonardo.it/ricetta_rigatoni_alla_fiorentina_1017.html>.
    >>
    >> Victor

    >
    >That's a protected site unavailable to the unwashed masses. Don't need it
    >today, though, because I am making tagliatelle ai carciofi con spicchi di
    >Pecorino affumicato.
    >


    They protect it by writing it in Italian and not providing
    translation. LOL! I found a tiramisu recipe.
    http://ricette.leonardo.it/ricetta_tiramisu'_956.html

    --
    See return address to reply by email
    remove the smile first

  11. #11
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    "sf" <.> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 11 Apr 2008 11:56:37 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>> Here is another, very similar recipe:
    >>> <http://ricette.leonardo.it/ricetta_rigatoni_alla_fiorentina_1017.html>.
    >>>
    >>> Victor

    >>
    >>That's a protected site unavailable to the unwashed masses. Don't need it
    >>today, though, because I am making tagliatelle ai carciofi con spicchi di
    >>Pecorino affumicato.
    >>

    >
    > They protect it by writing it in Italian and not providing
    > translation. LOL! I found a tiramisu recipe.
    > http://ricette.leonardo.it/ricetta_tiramisu'_956.html


    You must have been more washed than I. Sheldon claims I never bathe anyway.
    I got a message that said "in addition we found a 404 not found while trying
    to resolve the address you used."



  12. #12
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> ha scritto
    > >
    > > Here is another, very similar recipe:
    > > <http://ricette.leonardo.it/ricetta_rigatoni_alla_fiorentina_1017.html>.

    >
    > That's a protected site unavailable to the unwashed masses.


    Strange, I encountered no protection and still do not.

    Anyway, here it their recipe.

    Victor

    Rigatoni alla fiorentina

    Tempo Richiesto (in minuti): 180
    Ingredienti (per 6 persone): 500 gr di rigatoni, 150 gr di carne trita
    di manzo, 50 gr di pancetta a dadini, 4 fegatini di pollo, 1/2 bicchiere
    di vino bianco, olio, burro, 200 gr di pomodori pelati, sale, trito di
    carota, cipolla, sedano, rosmarino, aglio, salvia, prezzemolo e
    basilico.

    Preparazione: Rosolate il trito di verdure con l'olio e il burro,
    aggiungete la carne, la pancetta e i fegatini tagliati a pezzi
    piccolissimi. Versate il vino, mescolate e fate evaporare a fiamma
    vivace. Regolate di sale e aggiungete i pomodori. Coprite e cuocete a
    fuoco lento per circa 3 ore aggiungendo quando necessario qualche
    mestolo di acqua. Lessate i rigatoni in acqua salata, scolateli e
    conditeli con il sugo ottenuto.


  13. #13
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You must have been more washed than I. Sheldon claims I never bathe anyway.
    > I got a message that said "in addition we found a 404 not found while trying
    > to resolve the address you used."



    maybe it's only accessible if you're outside Italy. I had no problem
    with access, either.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor
    She's had good news! Hurrah!

  14. #14
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > maybe it's only accessible if you're outside Italy.


    Using a proxy server usually lets one get around any such restrictions.
    In this case, I do not think there is such a restriction, though. I
    have just used an Italian proxy and had no trouble accessing the site
    and the recipe.

    ObFood: Fagioli cotti nel fiasco. The recipe is from _Traditional
    recipes of lucchesian farmers_ by an unknown author, translated by Sonia
    Dini. The recipes are said to have been collected from actual farmers
    around Lucca ("from the live voice of countrywomen living in the
    surroundings of Lucca"). The oil used in the recipes is always to be
    understood as extra-virgin olive oil.

    Bubba

    Fagioli cotti nel fiasco

    For this recipe you will need an empty wine flask without the straw
    cover.

    Ingredients
    1 kg (2 lb) fresh cannelli beans, 1/2 glass olive oil, a few fresh sage
    leaves, 2 cloves garlic, salt, pepper and oil for serving.

    Method
    - Put the beans into the flask
    - Add the sage, garlic, and oil, then completely cover with water.
    - Place the flask on to a "flamegard" over a very low heat and simmer
    for about 3 hours (the contents must never reach boiling point).
    - When cooked drain and toss in oil with some salt and pepper.

  15. #15
    sf Guest

  16. #16
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?



    "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:1if9j7f.3fdp9g11r3jjqN%[email protected]. .
    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> maybe it's only accessible if you're outside Italy.

    >
    > Using a proxy server usually lets one get around any such restrictions.
    > In this case, I do not think there is such a restriction, though. I
    > have just used an Italian proxy and had no trouble accessing the site
    > and the recipe.
    >
    > ObFood: Fagioli cotti nel fiasco. The recipe is from _Traditional
    > recipes of lucchesian farmers_ by an unknown author, translated by Sonia
    > Dini. The recipes are said to have been collected from actual farmers
    > around Lucca ("from the live voice of countrywomen living in the
    > surroundings of Lucca"). The oil used in the recipes is always to be
    > understood as extra-virgin olive oil.
    >
    > Bubba
    >
    > Fagioli cotti nel fiasco
    >
    > For this recipe you will need an empty wine flask without the straw
    > cover.
    >
    > Ingredients
    > 1 kg (2 lb) fresh cannelli beans, 1/2 glass olive oil, a few fresh sage
    > leaves, 2 cloves garlic, salt, pepper and oil for serving.
    >
    > Method
    > - Put the beans into the flask
    > - Add the sage, garlic, and oil, then completely cover with water.
    > - Place the flask on to a "flamegard" over a very low heat and simmer
    > for about 3 hours (the contents must never reach boiling point).
    > - When cooked drain and toss in oil with some salt and pepper.


    That's a favorite in Umbria too, but we add other herbs as well. Leftovers
    are layered with Polenta and baked and the combination results in a
    surèprising flavor.



  17. #17
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    In article <1if9j7f.3fdp9g11r3jjqN%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > maybe it's only accessible if you're outside Italy.

    >
    > Using a proxy server usually lets one get around any such restrictions.
    > In this case, I do not think there is such a restriction, though. I
    > have just used an Italian proxy and had no trouble accessing the site
    > and the recipe.


    I was kidding, Bubba Vic. I forgot the wink.

    OB Food: Baked chicken wings for supper accompanied by something else
    and a green salad.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor
    She's had good news! Hurrah!

  18. #18
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was kidding, Bubba Vic. I forgot the wink.


    You may have been kidding, but there are, or used to be, rather a lot of
    Web sites inaccessible to residents of certain localities.

    ObFood: Mushrooms canapés. The recipe is from _Dreaming of the Tuscany
    Table_ by Carla Geri Camporesi. Note: broth is mentioned in the
    instructions but not in the list of ingredients.

    Bubba Vic

    Mushrooms canapés
    Crostini di funghi

    7 oz mushrooms (porcini (ceps) or ovoli), 1 clove garlic, half a small
    onion, a handful of parsley, 1 tablespoon capers in vinegar, 1 teaspoon
    butter, extra-virgin olive oil, salt and pepper

    Clean mushrooms, avoiding washing them when possible. Chop garlic,
    onion, parsley and mushrooms very finely. Warm 2 spoonfuls oil and
    butter and gently brown the mushroom mixture. Continue cooking adding
    salt, pepper and small quantities of broth from time to time. When
    ready, add minced capers, more parsley and blend the mixture, stirring
    gently and leave it to cool.

  19. #19
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    Melba's Jammin' <bar[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was kidding, Bubba Vic. I forgot the wink.


    You may have been kidding, but there are, or used to be, rather a lot of
    Web sites inaccessible to residents of certain localities.

    ObFood: Mushrooms canapés. The recipe is from _Dreaming of the Tuscany
    Table_ by Carla Geri Camporesi. Note: broth is mentioned in the
    instructions but not in the list of ingredients.

    Bubba Vic

    Mushrooms canapés
    Crostini di funghi

    7 oz mushrooms (porcini (ceps) or ovoli), 1 clove garlic, half a small
    onion, a handful of parsley, 1 tablespoon capers in vinegar, 1 teaspoon
    butter, extra-virgin olive oil, salt and pepper

    Clean mushrooms, avoiding washing them when possible. Chop garlic,
    onion, parsley and mushrooms very finely. Warm 2 spoonfuls oil and
    butter and gently brown the mushroom mixture. Continue cooking adding
    salt, pepper and small quantities of broth from time to time. When
    ready, add minced capers, more parsley and blend the mixture, stirring
    gently and leave it to cool.

  20. #20
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Is the food still Italian if the chef is a foreigner?

    Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Victor Sack" <[email protected]> ha scritto
    > >
    > > Fagioli cotti nel fiasco

    >
    > That's a favorite in Umbria too, but we add other herbs as well. Leftovers
    > are layered with Polenta and baked and the combination results in a
    > surèprising flavor.


    Do you think it might perhaps make more sense to prepare the dish in the
    oven rather than on stovetop, as called for in the recipe I posted? I'd
    be somewhat uncomfortable putting the bottle on the fire, even if there
    is a flame tamer in between.

    Victor

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