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Thread: food rut

  1. #1
    Tara Guest

    Default food rut

    I have been stuck in a rut with food and cooking for way too long. I
    am craving some new ingredients, flavors, and textures.

    Yesterday, I went to the Indian grocery store. I bought naan,
    prepared frozen dishes (mutter paneer, something else with okra,
    tomatoes, and potatoes), rice snacks, cardamom and pistachio ice
    cream. Nothing wakes up my palate like Indian food. It has a
    combination of flavors that I don't get from anything else. I wanted
    to buy tons more, but I have the summer off now so I will prolong the
    pleasure by giving myself the excuse to go in and browse more often.

    So, that was the quick fix. The food section in my local newspaper
    has a weekly column featuring produce in season. Each column has a
    recipe showcasing a more unusual fruit or vegetable. I am going to
    make that recipe each week. This week is kohlrabi. I know kohlrabi
    is not incredibly exotic, but I have never cooked it. I'm not sure
    if I have ever eaten it.

    That's my plan. Does anyone else get stuck in a rut?

    Tara

  2. #2
    The Ranger Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    Tara <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > [..] Does anyone else get stuck in a rut?


    No.

    "One is a lonely number."

    The Ranger



  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    Tara said...

    > Does anyone else get stuck in a rut?



    Tara,

    All my life!!!

    It was my fault!

    Best,

    Andy
    --
    Bread & Butter

  4. #4
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    On Jun 5, 11:24*am, Tara <jarvi...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    > I have been stuck in a rut with food and cooking for way too long. * I
    > am craving some new ingredients, flavors, and textures. *
    >
    > Yesterday, I went to the Indian grocery store. * I bought naan,
    > prepared frozen dishes (mutter paneer, something else with okra,
    > tomatoes, and potatoes), rice snacks, cardamom and pistachio ice
    > cream. * Nothing wakes up my palate like Indian food. * It has a
    > combination of flavors that I don't get from anything else. *I wanted
    > to buy tons more, but I have the summer off now so I will prolong the
    > pleasure by giving myself the excuse to go in and browse more often.
    >
    > So, that was the quick fix. * The food section in my local newspaper
    > has a weekly column featuring produce in season. * Each column has a
    > recipe showcasing a more unusual fruit or vegetable. * I am going to
    > make that recipe each week. * This week is kohlrabi. * I know kohlrabi
    > is not incredibly exotic, but I have never cooked it. * I'm not sure
    > if I have ever eaten it.
    >
    > That's my plan. * *Does anyone else get stuck in a rut?
    >
    > Tara


    Years ago my friend Bev had a share in an organic garden . One
    summer she got about a bushel of kohlrabi. Called me for ideas and I
    gave her the only recipes I could find (B4 the internet but tons of
    cookbooks!) One of the recipes was stuffed kohlrabi in a cream
    sauce. I think it was ground veal. She is a frugal person and won't
    waste anything. Unfortunately, she will never eat kohlrabi again!
    Lynn in Fargo

  5. #5
    Kelly Greene Guest

    Default Re: food rut


    "Tara" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I have been stuck in a rut with food and cooking for way too long. I
    > am craving some new ingredients, flavors, and textures.


    Hit the seasoning section of your local grocery store. You wouldn't believe
    the selection they have these days.

    >
    > Yesterday, I went to the Indian grocery store. I bought naan,
    > prepared frozen dishes (mutter paneer, something else with okra,
    > tomatoes, and potatoes), rice snacks, cardamom and pistachio ice
    > cream. Nothing wakes up my palate like Indian food. It has a
    > combination of flavors that I don't get from anything else. I wanted
    > to buy tons more, but I have the summer off now so I will prolong the
    > pleasure by giving myself the excuse to go in and browse more often.


    It can be spicy! Mexican food also. My family loves some of the spicy
    dishes we get when we eat out.

    >
    > So, that was the quick fix. The food section in my local newspaper
    > has a weekly column featuring produce in season. Each column has a
    > recipe showcasing a more unusual fruit or vegetable. I am going to
    > make that recipe each week. This week is kohlrabi. I know kohlrabi
    > is not incredibly exotic, but I have never cooked it. I'm not sure
    > if I have ever eaten it.
    >
    > That's my plan. Does anyone else get stuck in a rut?


    Yes, it happened to us. But then I decided some years ago to start adding
    more variety to our diet. And now that we're both retired we have more time
    to spend shopping, cooking, gardening and canning. I started to doing
    searches on the net, asking friends and family for their favorite recipes
    etc.

    >
    > Tara



    --
    Kelly..........
    If you're a past or present resident of
    NYC and want to share past experiences
    and current events with others from NYC,
    check out this free message Board:
    http://members6.boardhost.com/QueensNYer/
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


  6. #6
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    "Tara" wrote

    >I have been stuck in a rut with food and cooking for way too long. I
    > am craving some new ingredients, flavors, and textures.

    (snip)
    > That's my plan. Does anyone else get stuck in a rut?


    No, not really. See, when I was growing up, Mom was a wonderful mother but
    all food was repetitive and bland for the most part. It was hot, on time,
    and plentiful.
    I have no complaints as she taught me other skill areas and was (still is!)
    really great.

    Then, when I moved out, my roomates exposed me to much more. I set an ethic
    to always buy at least one food which I'd never tried before. It didnt have
    to be fancy or expensive, but each trip I'd get 'something new' to me. It
    was *real* easy at the start in the fresh veggie section and if some didnt
    work (don't try to just boil up some garlic for a veggie!) enough did or I
    learned how to cook one that didn't work the first time (bake eggplant
    please, straight boiled eggplant with skin on it just nasty).

    For 30 years I've been doing this although I don't 'always' find something
    new that appeals on every trip. At least once a month though, we do still.

    So, you are on the right path in general. Just get a few new items and
    you'll find some are keepers that slip into your diet. You won't get in a
    rut, if you have a wider array of things you like.

    Personally right now, munching on a slice of home made bread, toasted, and
    thinly spread with Promite and butter.



  7. #7
    Merryb Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    On Jun 5, 9:24*am, Tara <jarvi...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    > I have been stuck in a rut with food and cooking for way too long. * I
    > am craving some new ingredients, flavors, and textures. *
    >
    > Yesterday, I went to the Indian grocery store. * I bought naan,
    > prepared frozen dishes (mutter paneer, something else with okra,
    > tomatoes, and potatoes), rice snacks, cardamom and pistachio ice
    > cream. * Nothing wakes up my palate like Indian food. * It has a
    > combination of flavors that I don't get from anything else. *I wanted
    > to buy tons more, but I have the summer off now so I will prolong the
    > pleasure by giving myself the excuse to go in and browse more often.
    >
    > So, that was the quick fix. * The food section in my local newspaper
    > has a weekly column featuring produce in season. * Each column has a
    > recipe showcasing a more unusual fruit or vegetable. * I am going to
    > make that recipe each week. * This week is kohlrabi. * I know kohlrabi
    > is not incredibly exotic, but I have never cooked it. * I'm not sure
    > if I have ever eaten it.
    >
    > That's my plan. * *Does anyone else get stuck in a rut?
    >
    > Tara


    Almost always during the week- with our commute, we're gone for 12
    hours out of the day, so the last thing I feel like doing is cooking
    something different or detailed. I save that for the weekend! Tomorrow
    is my husband's b-day, and he has requested Bob Pastorio's Fish in
    Crazy Water, made with halibut my brother in law caught a few weeks
    ago...

  8. #8
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    On Jun 5, 9:47*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > Tara said...
    >
    > > Does anyone else get stuck in a rut?

    >
    > Tara,
    >
    > All my life!!!
    >
    > It was my fault!
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy
    > --
    > Bread & Butter


    I got stuck in a rut one time...just to see what it felt like.

  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    On Fri, 5 Jun 2009 18:07:53 -0400, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Tara" wrote
    >
    >>I have been stuck in a rut with food and cooking for way too long. I
    >> am craving some new ingredients, flavors, and textures.

    >(snip)
    >> That's my plan. Does anyone else get stuck in a rut?

    >
    >No, not really. See, when I was growing up, Mom was a wonderful mother but
    >all food was repetitive and bland for the most part. It was hot, on time,
    >and plentiful.
    >I have no complaints as she taught me other skill areas and was (still is!)
    >really great.
    >
    >Then, when I moved out, my roomates exposed me to much more. I set an ethic
    >to always buy at least one food which I'd never tried before. It didnt have
    >to be fancy or expensive, but each trip I'd get 'something new' to me. It
    >was *real* easy at the start in the fresh veggie section and if some didnt
    >work (don't try to just boil up some garlic for a veggie!) enough did or I
    >learned how to cook one that didn't work the first time (bake eggplant
    >please, straight boiled eggplant with skin on it just nasty).
    >
    >For 30 years I've been doing this although I don't 'always' find something
    >new that appeals on every trip. At least once a month though, we do still.
    >
    >So, you are on the right path in general. Just get a few new items and
    >you'll find some are keepers that slip into your diet. You won't get in a
    >rut, if you have a wider array of things you like.
    >
    >Personally right now, munching on a slice of home made bread, toasted, and
    >thinly spread with Promite and butter.
    >


    I think it's odd that for 30 years you've been *conscientiously*
    trying new things. Was your culinary upbringing so confined that you
    really have eat something new every month? I think my personal
    experience was fairly limited (except for special occasions), but I
    don't feel like I have to rebel and eat durian.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  10. #10
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    On Fri, 05 Jun 2009 12:24:31 -0400, Tara wrote:

    > I have been stuck in a rut with food and cooking for way too long. I
    > am craving some new ingredients, flavors, and textures.
    >
    > Yesterday, I went to the Indian grocery store. I bought naan,
    > prepared frozen dishes (mutter paneer, something else with okra,
    > tomatoes, and potatoes), rice snacks, cardamom and pistachio ice
    > cream. Nothing wakes up my palate like Indian food. It has a
    > combination of flavors that I don't get from anything else. I wanted
    > to buy tons more, but I have the summer off now so I will prolong the
    > pleasure by giving myself the excuse to go in and browse more often.
    >
    > So, that was the quick fix. The food section in my local newspaper
    > has a weekly column featuring produce in season. Each column has a
    > recipe showcasing a more unusual fruit or vegetable. I am going to
    > make that recipe each week. This week is kohlrabi. I know kohlrabi
    > is not incredibly exotic, but I have never cooked it. I'm not sure
    > if I have ever eaten it.
    >
    > That's my plan. Does anyone else get stuck in a rut?
    >
    > Tara


    i don't mean to sound simplistic, but is there anything you used to cook
    and like that you haven't made in a long time? i find that happens to me
    sometimes.

    your pal,
    blake

  11. #11
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    "sf" wrote
    > "cshenk" wrote:


    >>For 30 years I've been doing this although I don't 'always' find

    something
    >>new that appeals on every trip. At least once a month though, we do
    >>still.


    > I think it's odd that for 30 years you've been *conscientiously*
    > trying new things.


    It got to be a habit and one the family likes.

    > Was your culinary upbringing so confined that you
    > really have eat something new every month? I think my personal
    > experience was fairly limited (except for special occasions), but I
    > don't feel like I have to rebel and eat durian.


    Grin, it was that limited. We used to pray for TV dinners and school
    lunches. To give an idea, Mom never made a pizza the whole time I was
    growing up. Pizza is too 'fancy' (even boxed frozen). I remember she got
    celery once. Thanksgiving was cool because thats when you saw Gravy (from a
    packet, add water and heat), Stuffing (from a bag, nothing added but what
    the bag's basic directions called for), and sweet potatoes (from a can).

    Every meal was a balanced meat (hamburger, baked steak well done, baked
    chicken, on rare times - baked fish sticks), a vegetable (green beans, peas,
    pea and carrots, on rare times - lima beans), and a starch (boiled potates
    or baked, on rare times- rice-a-roni). Once every 3-4 months she'd get wild
    and make macaroni and cheese or she'd stuff a green pepper.

    There were occasional forays into other things but they were very 'standard'
    and she didnt have a spice cabinet, just a jar of cinnimon, and some salt
    and there was a rarely seen black pepper shaker. Imagine lasagna made with
    no spices (grin).

    Although I was aware there were cereals other than Corn Flakes, I never saw
    them at home except once she got a box of shredded wheat (her version of try
    something new). It was Corn Flakes or Oatmeal. Once a month, she'd get ice
    cream (Vanilla, chocolate or Strawberry only).

    Grin, Mom was always delighted to have our friends join for dinner but for
    some odd reason, they tended to do it only once.

    Now, before you think Mom was a bad one, nope! She's just not much of a
    cook. It's her *only* failing. She raised 3 highly successful kids on her
    own by doing what today is called 'flipping houses'. Extremely unusual in
    those days to see a woman with 3 kids doing that alone (strange even today
    come to think of it!).

    I was raised by a woman who believed and _lived_ that 'people, even women
    people, could do anything if they just studied the problem up and then got
    to work on it'. It's people who don't study up or just don't start the work
    who have problems.

    So, I learned to lay wood floors from raw planks with standard hand tools
    over slab cement by age 11 (I was tiling floors by age 8). I learned to do
    wallpapering (and was the only one of us 4 with that skill) by age 10. My
    sister (biggest one of us all, ended up a hair under 6ft) did plummer work
    and wall framing. All of us do drywall and painting. I do custom
    woodworking (including raw wood to replacement window frame parts that have
    rotted out) and have even done a whole kitchen cabinet set starting with raw
    lumber (had the formica tops cut for us to measure I admit). My brother
    does anything electrical short of replacing the master panels but Mom always
    arranged a professional to come check before anything was actually wired to
    the house. By the time he was 12, they never found an error. When I was 13
    and my brother 14, Mom set us to finishing off 1,600 feet of basement (She
    and Sis were primary on upstairs, Bro and me on basement). Took us 2
    summers to finish that house but it was really *nice*. Mom made 92,000$
    profit off that house in 1975 after 2 years living there with us all (we
    always lived in the ones we were fixing). Anyways, nuff about that but you
    get the picture.

    So Mom can't cook fancy? Thats not really true. See, she just wasnt
    *interested* in learning how. She did teach me how to make hamburger helper
    though! I think I was 16 or so?

    To come back to topic, new purchase this month: Artichoke heart. It's just
    a little thing in a glass jar but have never tried it. I bet I'll like it!
    I assume 'heat and serve with butter at the side?'



  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    On Sat, 6 Jun 2009 13:05:32 -0400, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >To come back to topic, new purchase this month: Artichoke heart. It's just
    >a little thing in a glass jar but have never tried it. I bet I'll like it!
    >I assume 'heat and serve with butter at the side?'


    I'd use jarred artichoke hearts "in" something. Start here
    http://artichoke-recipes.epicurean.c...rtichoke+Heart

    Have you ever eaten a fresh artichoke? Here are some interesting
    recipes to dip the leaves in http://artichokes.org/recipes.html

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  13. #13
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    "sf" wrote
    > "cshenk" wrote:


    >>To come back to topic, new purchase this month: Artichoke heart. It's
    >>just
    >>a little thing in a glass jar but have never tried it. I bet I'll like
    >>it!
    >>I assume 'heat and serve with butter at the side?'

    >
    > I'd use jarred artichoke hearts "in" something. Start here
    > http://artichoke-recipes.epicurean.c...rtichoke+Heart


    Uwww. Hate that site. Coated with icky popups and sales junk. Sorry.



  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    On Sat, 6 Jun 2009 16:55:54 -0400, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"sf" wrote
    >> "cshenk" wrote:

    >
    >>>To come back to topic, new purchase this month: Artichoke heart. It's
    >>>just
    >>>a little thing in a glass jar but have never tried it. I bet I'll like
    >>>it!
    >>>I assume 'heat and serve with butter at the side?'

    >>
    >> I'd use jarred artichoke hearts "in" something. Start here
    >> http://artichoke-recipes.epicurean.c...rtichoke+Heart

    >
    >Uwww. Hate that site. Coated with icky popups and sales junk. Sorry.
    >

    HUH! It looked like a perfectly site to me. Switch to Firefox and
    install AdBlock.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  15. #15
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    cshenk wrote:

    > To come back to topic, new purchase this month: Artichoke heart. It's
    > just a little thing in a glass jar but have never tried it. I bet I'll
    > like it! I assume 'heat and serve with butter at the side?'


    If they're MARINATED artichoke hearts you can just toss them with angel hair
    pasta and sprinkle with grated parm-reggiano. If you want more oompf, add
    some sautéed chicken livers.

    Bob


  16. #16
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    On Sat, 6 Jun 2009 18:03:51 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >cshenk wrote:
    >
    >> To come back to topic, new purchase this month: Artichoke heart. It's
    >> just a little thing in a glass jar but have never tried it. I bet I'll
    >> like it! I assume 'heat and serve with butter at the side?'

    >
    >If they're MARINATED artichoke hearts you can just toss them with angel hair
    >pasta and sprinkle with grated parm-reggiano. If you want more oompf, add
    >some sautéed chicken livers.
    >
    >Bob


    They can also be good in a frittata, or on a pizza. Or in a salad..
    That is, if they are marinated...

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  17. #17
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: food rut

    "Christine Dabney" wrote
    > "Bob Terwilliger" wrote:
    >>cshenk wrote:


    >>> To come back to topic, new purchase this month: Artichoke heart. It's
    >>> just a little thing in a glass jar but have never tried it. I bet I'll
    >>> like it! I assume 'heat and serve with butter at the side?'


    >>If they're MARINATED artichoke hearts you can just toss them with angel
    >>hair
    >>pasta and sprinkle with grated parm-reggiano. If you want more oompf, add
    >>some sautéed chicken livers.


    > They can also be good in a frittata, or on a pizza. Or in a salad..
    > That is, if they are marinated...


    They are and thanks both! I was looking over my recipe database and found
    some interesting ideas. I don't have angel-hair pasta but I do have some
    nice rice noodles. I was looking at making them up simple then topping with
    the artichoke and slivers of a hard grating cheese (parm like but not in a
    jar pre-grated, label gone now and have a decent block left). It sounds
    like a few cold boiled shrimps wouldnt be astray on it.



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