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Thread: food parcel to usa

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default food parcel to usa

    I am about to send a present/parcel to Usa, Alabama

    Does anyone know if I am allowed to send: tins of anchives, anchives
    in a glass with olive oil. dryed pasta, dryed vegetable in packets.

    TThank you

    Orietta

  2. #2
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: food parcel to usa

    <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >I am about to send a present/parcel to Usa, Alabama
    >
    > Does anyone know if I am allowed to send: tins of anchives, anchives
    > in a glass with olive oil. dryed pasta, dryed vegetable in packets.
    >
    > TThank you
    >
    > Orietta


    Processed foods in unopened packets are fine as long as they have no meat in
    them. The rule for cheese is it must be 6 months aged or longer, but you'd
    be unlikely to send a fresh cheese anyway.



  3. #3
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: food parcel to usa

    On Dec 19, 3:11*am, "Giusi" <decobabe...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > <gl0301...@googlemail.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    > >I am about to send a present/parcel to Usa, Alabama

    >
    > > Does anyone know if I am allowed to send: tins of anchives, anchives
    > > in a glass with olive oil. dryed pasta, dryed vegetable in packets.

    >
    > > TThank you

    >
    > > Orietta

    >
    > Processed foods in unopened packets are fine as long as they have no meatin
    > them. *The rule for cheese is it must be 6 months aged or longer, but you'd
    > be unlikely to send a fresh cheese anyway.


    I know some customs agents in Chicago had a lovely bit of sausage that
    was intercepted.... ;-)

    N.

  4. #4
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: food parcel to usa

    It sounds okay to me. In most countries in the world, if
    you go to the post office with an international package
    they will have you describe its contents on a little sticker
    that goes on the package. Also you will say it is a gift
    (assuming it is). When it arrives at the destination country,
    the customs worker looks at the sticker and unless it says
    something alarming (such as, "beef", the most alarming word
    in international commerce), it will pass through.

    If it's cheese, write "aged cheese" on the sticker.

    A phrase like "tinned fish" is a better bet than simply "fish".

    It's a little trickier if it's not a gift. I once got away
    with sending "clothing purchased in the U.S." back to the U.S.
    without paying customs. (This was of course a truthful
    declaration.) Worst case, the recipient gets a customs
    slip instead of the package, and needs to go down to a
    warehouse near the airport and claim it in person,
    possibly involving explanations and/or customs payments.

    Steve

  5. #5
    Rhonda Anderson Guest

    Default Re: food parcel to usa

    [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote in news:gihjdd$999$1
    @blue.rahul.net:

    > It sounds okay to me. In most countries in the world, if
    > you go to the post office with an international package
    > they will have you describe its contents on a little sticker
    > that goes on the package. Also you will say it is a gift
    > (assuming it is). When it arrives at the destination country,
    > the customs worker looks at the sticker and unless it says
    > something alarming (such as, "beef", the most alarming word
    > in international commerce), it will pass through.


    Unless the desination country is Australia in which case it will go through
    an x-ray where both Customs (looking for drugs, weapons and dutiable items
    etc.) and Quarantine (looking for items of plant, animal or microbial
    origin including a lot of foodstuffs) officers will analyse the image in
    conjunction with the declaration. The x-ray is not like one your doctor
    takes of you, but shows in different colours depending on atomic weight of
    the item - organic items show up differently to metal, for example.

    If it's considered there's anything in it of either Quarantine or Customs
    concern (or both) it will be sent for inspection. If not, it goes on its
    way but may be screened by Quarantine detector dogs before it gets out - if
    the dogs detect something missed on x-ray it will go for inspection.

    For items going into Australia (and New Zealand) there are restrictions on
    a lot of items besides beef.

    When I'm not cooking or crafting, I work for the Australian Quarantine and
    Inspection Service, currently in the International Mail Program :-)

    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia

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