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Thread: Filtering water from pumpkin puree

  1. #1
    Dave Boland Guest

    Default Filtering water from pumpkin puree

    All,

    We are going to try homemade pumpkin puree this year (again) and I'm
    looking for a good way to filter the excess water out of the puree.
    Last year we used a coffee filter, 8-10 cup, in a colander, but that was
    a little tedious. I thought about cheesecloth, but all I have found is
    Chinese made, which I don't trust, and boutique packages that are small
    and expensive. Larger coffee filters are an option, but they are 200
    count -- way too many. Anyone have a suggestion based on their experience?

    Thanks,
    Dave

  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Filtering water from pumpkin puree

    Dave Boland wrote:
    > All,
    >
    > We are going to try homemade pumpkin puree this year (again) and I'm
    > looking for a good way to filter the excess water out of the puree. Last
    > year we used a coffee filter, 8-10 cup, in a colander, but that was a
    > little tedious. I thought about cheesecloth, but all I have found is
    > Chinese made, which I don't trust, and boutique packages that are small
    > and expensive. Larger coffee filters are an option, but they are 200
    > count -- way too many. Anyone have a suggestion based on their experience?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Dave


    Any decent muslin cloth will do the job. I use my jelly strainer for the
    job. You can also use a 20 screen strainer, one of those metal jobs with
    the hooks on one side for hanging over a pot and the handle on the other
    side. I use that for straining pear pulp a lot and the pumpkin pulp
    shouldn't be any more trouble.

  3. #3
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Filtering water from pumpkin puree

    On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 11:35:57 -0500, Dave Boland <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >All,
    >
    >We are going to try homemade pumpkin puree this year (again) and I'm
    >looking for a good way to filter the excess water out of the puree.
    >Last year we used a coffee filter, 8-10 cup, in a colander, but that was
    >a little tedious. I thought about cheesecloth, but all I have found is
    >Chinese made, which I don't trust, and boutique packages that are small
    >and expensive. Larger coffee filters are an option, but they are 200
    >count -- way too many. Anyone have a suggestion based on their experience?
    >

    Typically the excess moisture is removed from pumpkin by cutting the
    peeled flesh into chunks and baking it in a pan in a slow oven.

  4. #4
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Filtering water from pumpkin puree

    brooklyn1 wrote:
    > On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 11:35:57 -0500, Dave Boland <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> All,
    >>
    >> We are going to try homemade pumpkin puree this year (again) and I'm
    >> looking for a good way to filter the excess water out of the puree.
    >> Last year we used a coffee filter, 8-10 cup, in a colander, but that was
    >> a little tedious. I thought about cheesecloth, but all I have found is
    >> Chinese made, which I don't trust, and boutique packages that are small
    >> and expensive. Larger coffee filters are an option, but they are 200
    >> count -- way too many. Anyone have a suggestion based on their experience?
    >>

    > Typically the excess moisture is removed from pumpkin by cutting the
    > peeled flesh into chunks and baking it in a pan in a slow oven.



    Yep. If you already have puree, it can be thickened by baking it
    uncovered in a slow oven in cake or lasagna pans. But if you really
    want to filter it, use muslin instead of cheesecloth. An old sheet or
    pillowcase will work if not too threadbare; if you buy a new piece of
    muslin cloth, you need to wash it to remove most of the sizing.

    Bob

  5. #5
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: Filtering water from pumpkin puree

    On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 11:07:53 -0600, George Shirley
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Dave Boland wrote:
    >> All,
    >>
    >> We are going to try homemade pumpkin puree this year (again) and I'm
    >> looking for a good way to filter the excess water out of the puree. Last
    >> year we used a coffee filter, 8-10 cup, in a colander, but that was a
    >> little tedious. I thought about cheesecloth, but all I have found is
    >> Chinese made, which I don't trust, and boutique packages that are small
    >> and expensive. Larger coffee filters are an option, but they are 200
    >> count -- way too many. Anyone have a suggestion based on their experience?
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Dave

    >
    >Any decent muslin cloth will do the job. I use my jelly strainer for the
    >job. You can also use a 20 screen strainer, one of those metal jobs with
    >the hooks on one side for hanging over a pot and the handle on the other
    >side. I use that for straining pear pulp a lot and the pumpkin pulp
    >shouldn't be any more trouble.


    That's what we do. Just did it two days ago actually. Fill the sieve
    and let it sit over a bowl for an hour or so and it's ready to use.
    We made two pumpkin rolls. I don't care for pumpkin but the rolls
    Louise makes are to die for.

    Lou

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Filtering water from pumpkin puree

    On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 11:35:57 -0500, Dave Boland <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >All,
    >
    >We are going to try homemade pumpkin puree this year (again) and I'm
    >looking for a good way to filter the excess water out of the puree.
    >Last year we used a coffee filter, 8-10 cup, in a colander, but that was
    >a little tedious.


    Tedious? It sounds like you're making this into more work than it is.

    >I thought about cheesecloth, but all I have found is
    >Chinese made, which I don't trust, and boutique packages that are small
    >and expensive.


    Cheese cloth should be inexpensive. Can't you buy it at the grocery
    store anymore?

    >Larger coffee filters are an option, but they are 200
    >count -- way too many. Anyone have a suggestion based on their experience?
    >

    I've made puree from fresh pumpkins, but not to can. I just straight
    up make the pie.

    The first thing I do is bake the pumpkin on a cookie sheet (the kind
    with sides), cut side down. Baking helps evaporate and a lot of
    liquid comes out, which is why you need sides. After that, I skinned
    it and chunked up the flesh. I had a large fine meshed strainer at
    the time, so I just put it directly into the strainer and let it sit
    another 24 hours to drain. I don't see why a colander can't serve the
    same purpose. A LOT of liquid comes out that way. There is nothing
    tedious about it, there is no effort on your part - just time.

    I've never pressed it, put it into a towel to wring more or put it
    into a slow oven to bake off more liquid, but I guess you could. I
    decided to deal with fresh pumpkin the way it is, otherwise I buy
    canned.



    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  7. #7
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Filtering water from pumpkin puree

    On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 10:20:06 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 11:35:57 -0500, Dave Boland <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>All,
    >>
    >>We are going to try homemade pumpkin puree this year (again) and I'm
    >>looking for a good way to filter the excess water out of the puree.
    >>Last year we used a coffee filter, 8-10 cup, in a colander, but that was
    >>a little tedious.

    >
    >Tedious? It sounds like you're making this into more work than it is.
    >
    >>I thought about cheesecloth, but all I have found is
    >>Chinese made, which I don't trust, and boutique packages that are small
    >>and expensive.

    >
    >Cheese cloth should be inexpensive. Can't you buy it at the grocery
    >store anymore?
    >
    >>Larger coffee filters are an option, but they are 200
    >>count -- way too many. Anyone have a suggestion based on their experience?
    >>

    >I've made puree from fresh pumpkins, but not to can. I just straight
    >up make the pie.
    >
    >The first thing I do is bake the pumpkin on a cookie sheet (the kind
    >with sides), cut side down. Baking helps evaporate and a lot of
    >liquid comes out, which is why you need sides. After that, I skinned
    >it and chunked up the flesh. I had a large fine meshed strainer at
    >the time, so I just put it directly into the strainer and let it sit
    >another 24 hours to drain. I don't see why a colander can't serve the
    >same purpose. A LOT of liquid comes out that way. There is nothing
    >tedious about it, there is no effort on your part - just time.
    >
    >I've never pressed it, put it into a towel to wring more or put it
    >into a slow oven to bake off more liquid, but I guess you could. I
    >decided to deal with fresh pumpkin the way it is, otherwise I buy
    >canned.


    Canned is good... and instead of fresh pumpkin use fresh butternut
    squash.

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Filtering water from pumpkin puree

    On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 13:40:25 -0500, brooklyn1
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Canned is good... and instead of fresh pumpkin use fresh butternut
    >squash.


    I've thought about it, but never tried it. Probably tastes better
    than fresh pumpkin.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  9. #9
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Filtering water from pumpkin puree

    On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 14:55:33 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 13:40:25 -0500, brooklyn1
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Canned is good... and instead of fresh pumpkin use fresh butternut
    >>squash.

    >
    >I've thought about it, but never tried it. Probably tastes better
    >than fresh pumpkin.


    Most commercially made pumpkin pie is actually butternut... even
    canned pumpkin is butternut... they're allowed because both are the
    same family of plant.

  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Filtering water from pumpkin puree

    In article <hdk1rn$eb7$[email protected]>, Dave Boland <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > All,
    >
    > We are going to try homemade pumpkin puree this year (again) and I'm
    > looking for a good way to filter the excess water out of the puree.
    > Last year we used a coffee filter, 8-10 cup, in a colander, but that was
    > a little tedious. I thought about cheesecloth, but all I have found is
    > Chinese made, which I don't trust, and boutique packages that are small
    > and expensive. Larger coffee filters are an option, but they are 200
    > count -- way too many. Anyone have a suggestion based on their experience?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Dave


    Mom always just used a screen strainer.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

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