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Thread: Fermented Fish and Chicken Fried Rice

  1. #1
    squirtz Guest

    Default Fermented Fish and Chicken Fried Rice

    This is a Cantonese specialty often seen on menus as "Salted Fish
    and Chicken Fried Rice" or "Chicken and Anchovy Fried Rice". If
    there are red ducks hanging in the window then they will probably
    have this dish.

    I use cubed and lightly marinated chicken breast (light soy,
    Shaohsing wine, fish sauce), ginger, garlic, peas, shredded
    lettuce, and green onion. Shredded or julienne chicken is also
    common.

    http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/7527/salted3.jpg

    The rice should be day-old rice from the fridge or you can lightly
    dry fresh cooked rice in a low oven for 20 minutes followed by
    freezing it, which is what I did this afternoon. Takes about an
    hour to get the rice ready using this technique.

    The fish - the most important ingredient - is usually dried salted
    fish but the quality, price, longevity, and availability of those
    can vary. They taste musty to me. And they're hard to work with.

    I prefer the more potent dried mackerel which has been preserved in
    oil. It runs about $4/bottle. Each "steak" weighs about 2 ounces.
    They are softer and easier to incorporate into most dishes. I will
    use 1.5 of these in my dish.

    http://img257.imageshack.us/img257/7417/salted2.jpg

    These are de-spined and skinned then flaked/mashed and added to the
    hot oil along with the ginger and garlic. There should be no large
    pieces - the hot oil will help separate them into small bits. Open
    a SCREENED window or door. Without a screen you will be making
    FLIED rice - this stuff really stinks and attracts flies.

    Proceed as for any fried rice recipe, adding the lettuce after the
    heat is turned off and just before serving so it's wilted but not
    cooked too badly. Top with optional chiles for color and flavor.
    Serve with some home made shrimp egg rolls and some Mae Ploy for
    dipping (with added sriracha and rice vinegar).

    http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/6720/salted1.jpg

    This is almost always the most expensive fried rice dish on the
    menus that feature it; $11-$12 compared to the standard pork fried
    rice at $7. This costs me about $2 to make at home.

    Any questions, just ask. Enjoy.

    [I can't really see these photos because of the computer I'm using
    but I'll assume they turned out unless somebody says otherwise]

    -sw

  2. #2
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Fermented Fish and Chicken Fried Rice

    On Fri, 22 Oct 2010 16:24:45 -0500, squirtz wrote:
    >
    > http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/6720/salted1.jpg
    >
    > This is almost always the most expensive fried rice dish on the
    > menus that feature it; $11-$12 compared to the standard pork fried
    > rice at $7. This costs me about $2 to make at home.
    >
    > Any questions, just ask. Enjoy.
    >
    > [I can't really see these photos because of the computer I'm using
    > but I'll assume they turned out unless somebody says otherwise]
    >
    > -sw


    the pics worked just fine.

    your pal,
    blake

  3. #3
    Bigbazza Guest

    Default Re: Fermented Fish and Chicken Fried Rice

    "squirtz" wrote in message news:1g94gekf0qeqy$.[email protected]..

    This is a Cantonese specialty often seen on menus as "Salted Fish
    and Chicken Fried Rice" or "Chicken and Anchovy Fried Rice". If
    there are red ducks hanging in the window then they will probably
    have this dish.

    I use cubed and lightly marinated chicken breast (light soy,
    Shaohsing wine, fish sauce), ginger, garlic, peas, shredded
    lettuce, and green onion. Shredded or julienne chicken is also
    common.

    http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/7527/salted3.jpg

    The rice should be day-old rice from the fridge or you can lightly
    dry fresh cooked rice in a low oven for 20 minutes followed by
    freezing it, which is what I did this afternoon. Takes about an
    hour to get the rice ready using this technique.

    The fish - the most important ingredient - is usually dried salted
    fish but the quality, price, longevity, and availability of those
    can vary. They taste musty to me. And they're hard to work with.

    I prefer the more potent dried mackerel which has been preserved in
    oil. It runs about $4/bottle. Each "steak" weighs about 2 ounces.
    They are softer and easier to incorporate into most dishes. I will
    use 1.5 of these in my dish.

    http://img257.imageshack.us/img257/7417/salted2.jpg

    These are de-spined and skinned then flaked/mashed and added to the
    hot oil along with the ginger and garlic. There should be no large
    pieces - the hot oil will help separate them into small bits. Open
    a SCREENED window or door. Without a screen you will be making
    FLIED rice - this stuff really stinks and attracts flies.

    Proceed as for any fried rice recipe, adding the lettuce after the
    heat is turned off and just before serving so it's wilted but not
    cooked too badly. Top with optional chiles for color and flavor.
    Serve with some home made shrimp egg rolls and some Mae Ploy for
    dipping (with added sriracha and rice vinegar).

    http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/6720/salted1.jpg

    This is almost always the most expensive fried rice dish on the
    menus that feature it; $11-$12 compared to the standard pork fried
    rice at $7. This costs me about $2 to make at home.

    Any questions, just ask. Enjoy.

    [I can't really see these photos because of the computer I'm using
    but I'll assume they turned out unless somebody says otherwise]

    -sw


    Mmmmm....That looks nice, SW.......

    -- Bigbazza (Barry) Oz

    Dogs believe they are human. Cats believe they are God.





  4. #4
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Fermented Fish and Chicken Fried Rice

    On 2010-10-22, squirtz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Shaohsing wine, fish sauce), ginger, garlic, peas, shredded


    Judging by the pic, it looks like you're using pickled ginger instead
    of fresh. Am I seeing that right?

    > Proceed as for any fried rice recipe, adding the lettuce.....


    Using iceberg lettuce is a new one on me. Would napa cabbage sub?

    > Serve with some home made shrimp egg rolls.....


    Now we're talking! Gimme dem egg rolls!! Wasn't it you, Steve, that
    did a good photo spread on making viet-style fried eggrolls? Is that
    series still viewable, somewhere?

    > some Mae Ploy for dipping (with added sriracha and rice vinegar).


    When you say jes "Mae Ploy", I assume from the application you mean MP
    sweet chili sauce. Yes, no, maybe? Mae Ploy makes many other
    products, including the best canned coconut milk, I've found (lotta
    cream).

    I'll give yer dipping sauce a try. I use MP SCS, but my old standby,
    taught to my by the viet lunchtruck owner who got me hooked on them
    damn eggrolls, was ketchup/sriracha/sugar/FS and water to thin (hey,
    he hadda turn a buck!).

    > Any questions, just ask. Enjoy.


    See above.

    > [I can't really see these photos because of the computer I'm using
    > but I'll assume they turned out unless somebody says otherwise]


    They look great, Steve. I saved 'em, but promise not to peddle them
    to Kraft or Beatrice.

    nb

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