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Thread: fava beans

  1. #1
    sf Guest

    Default fava beans


    Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in their
    shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at home, only
    eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll try making risotto for the
    very first time ever and add the favas to it. <biting nails>

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  2. #2
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    sf wrote:

    > Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in their
    > shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at home, only
    > eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll try making risotto for the
    > very first time ever and add the favas to it. <biting nails>


    How much did you buy? Only about 5% of a fava bean in the shell is actually
    eaten; the outer shell and the inner skins get thrown away. Risotto sounds
    like a very good use for them.

    Bob


  3. #3
    Stan Horwitz Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in their
    > shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at home, only
    > eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll try making risotto for the
    > very first time ever and add the favas to it. <biting nails>


    Favor beans can be used just like lima beans.

  4. #4
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    sf wrote:
    > Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in their
    > shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at home, only
    > eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll try making risotto for the
    > very first time ever and add the favas to it. <biting nails>


    A wonderful Middle Eastern dish is to have a pile of cooked fava beans
    served in the center of a plate of humus - delicious.

    -S-



  5. #5
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >sf wrote:


    >> Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in their
    >> shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at home, only
    >> eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll try making risotto for the
    >> very first time ever and add the favas to it. <biting nails>


    >How much did you buy? Only about 5% of a fava bean in the shell is actually
    >eaten; the outer shell and the inner skins get thrown away. Risotto sounds
    >like a very good use for them.


    Actually it's not absolutely true that the outer shells and skins
    are thrown away; sometimes the very young beans are cooked up whole.
    (Batter-fried for example). But they gotta be small, only two
    to three inches total length.

    Steve

  6. #6
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    Steve wrote on Sat, 22 May 2010 11:21:10 -0400:

    > sf wrote:
    >> Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in
    >> their shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at
    >> home, only eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll try
    >> making risotto for the very first time ever and add the favas
    >> to it. <biting nails>


    > A wonderful Middle Eastern dish is to have a pile of cooked
    > fava beans served in the center of a plate of humus -
    > delicious.


    As someone who has never tried fresh fava beans, do you eat the pods
    too? The prices the stores charge would make eating the beans alone
    expensive.


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  7. #7
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    In article <ht8thb$483$[email protected]>,
    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > As someone who has never tried fresh fava beans, do you eat the pods
    > too? The prices the stores charge would make eating the beans alone
    > expensive.


    Pods off. Sorry.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    sf wrote:
    >
    > Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in their
    > shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at home, only
    > eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll try making risotto for the
    > very first time ever and add the favas to it. <biting nails>


    Some people can get ill from eating fava beans.
    I used to have a neighbor who had this.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Favism

  9. #9
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: fava beans


    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > sf wrote:
    >>
    >> Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in their>>
    >> shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at home, only>>
    >> eaten them in restaurants.


    > Some people can get ill from eating fava beans.
    > I used to have a neighbor who had this.


    All the shops and supermarkets have signs at the front warning that there
    are fave around, because apparently even getting near them is a problem.



  10. #10
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    The message <ht8thb$483$1@news.eternal-se[email protected]>
    from "James Silverton" <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > As someone who has never tried fresh fava beans, do you eat the pods
    > too? The prices the stores charge would make eating the beans alone
    > expensive.


    If you grow your own you can cook and eat tiny pods whole ; but the
    immature beans inside are tiny.
    Otherwise, you remove the pods. They are expensive to buy fresh by
    weight because of the wastage, but cheap and easy to grow.
    Cheaper to buy frozen ones, where you're only paying for the beans.

    Janet.

  11. #11
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    Giusi wrote:
    >
    > "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > > sf wrote:
    > >>
    > >> Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in their>>
    > >> shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at home, only>>
    > >> eaten them in restaurants.

    >
    > > Some people can get ill from eating fava beans.
    > > I used to have a neighbor who had this.

    >
    > All the shops and supermarkets have signs at the front warning that there
    > are fave around, because apparently even getting near them is a problem.


    I've never seen a sign like that. The molecules
    that cause favism aren't volatile at all,
    so I don't think there's a problem with being
    near them. My neighbor used to raise fava beans,
    he just didn't eat them.

  12. #12
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: fava beans


    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > Giusi wrote:
    >> > Some people can get ill from eating fava beans.
    >> > I used to have a neighbor who had this.

    >>
    >> All the shops and supermarkets have signs at the front warning that there
    >> are fave around, because apparently even getting near them is a problem.

    >
    > I've never seen a sign like that. The molecules
    > that cause favism aren't volatile at all,
    > so I don't think there's a problem with being
    > near them. My neighbor used to raise fava beans,
    > he just didn't eat them.


    Then either the entire Italian country is wrong, or there is another allergy
    problem of which you know nothing.



  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    On Sat, 22 May 2010 09:22:25 -0400, Stan Horwitz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in their
    > > shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at home, only
    > > eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll try making risotto for the
    > > very first time ever and add the favas to it. <biting nails>

    >
    > Favor beans can be used just like lima beans.


    That's no help. I've never cooked limas fresh from the pod either.
    In any case, I know what dish I'm making - just not how long to cook
    them.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    On Sat, 22 May 2010 09:46:06 -0700, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    > >
    > > Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans in their
    > > shells for the first time. I've never prepared them at home, only
    > > eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll try making risotto for the
    > > very first time ever and add the favas to it. <biting nails>

    >
    > Some people can get ill from eating fava beans.
    > I used to have a neighbor who had this.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Favism


    I've eaten them before (restaurants) with no problem.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  15. #15
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    Janet Baraclough <[email protected]> wrote:

    >from "James Silverton" <[email protected]> contains these words:


    >> As someone who has never tried fresh fava beans, do you eat the pods
    >> too? The prices the stores charge would make eating the beans alone
    >> expensive.


    >If you grow your own you can cook and eat tiny pods whole ; but the
    >immature beans inside are tiny.


    Yep, or if the local farmers will harvest them that soon.
    They usually don't, except by request from some restaurants.

    >Otherwise, you remove the pods. They are expensive to buy fresh by
    >weight because of the wastage, but cheap and easy to grow.
    >Cheaper to buy frozen ones, where you're only paying for the beans.


    I find it time consuming to shell them. When I do manage to do it,
    I remove the beans from the pod, boil them about 8 minuts, then
    let them cool and remove the outer bean-skins. Then they are
    ready to be made into fava bean spread (olive oil, sea salt,
    finely chopped mint, and a tiny amount of white wine vinegar...
    be careful, as fresh favas have a delicate flavor and it's
    easy to overwhelm them with lemon juice or too much vinegar).

    Steve

  16. #16
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    James Silverton wrote:
    >
    > As someone who has never tried fresh fava beans, do you eat the pods
    > too? The prices the stores charge would make eating the beans alone
    > expensive.


    No, you don't eat the pods. There's also an inner hull that can be eaten
    on fresh spring favas, because it's fairly tender, but it needs to be
    removed later in the season.

    We got some really good ones in the farm box recently.

    Serene

    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  17. #17
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    sf wrote on Sat, 22 May 2010 11:32:21 -0700:

    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    > >> Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans
    > >> in their shells for the first time. I've never prepared
    > >> them at home, only eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll
    > >> try making risotto for the very first time ever and add the
    > >> favas to it. <biting nails>

    >>
    >> Favor beans can be used just like lima beans.


    > That's no help. I've never cooked limas fresh from the pod
    > either. In any case, I know what dish I'm making - just not
    > how long to cook them.


    IMHO, frozen limas are just fine but I've never tried frozen favas. I'll
    have to look out for them.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    On Sat, 22 May 2010 15:45:10 -0400, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf wrote on Sat, 22 May 2010 11:32:21 -0700:
    >
    > >> In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > > >> Passed a farm stand today and bought some fresh fava beans
    > > >> in their shells for the first time. I've never prepared
    > > >> them at home, only eaten them in restaurants. I think I'll
    > > >> try making risotto for the very first time ever and add the
    > > >> favas to it. <biting nails>
    > >>
    > >> Favor beans can be used just like lima beans.

    >
    > > That's no help. I've never cooked limas fresh from the pod
    > > either. In any case, I know what dish I'm making - just not
    > > how long to cook them.

    >
    > IMHO, frozen limas are just fine but I've never tried frozen favas. I'll
    > have to look out for them.


    OK, I'll give up on getting anything worthwhile from you two.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  19. #19
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    sf wrote:

    > That's no help. I've never cooked limas fresh from the pod either.
    > In any case, I know what dish I'm making - just not how long to cook
    > them.


    Oh, I can help with that: After you've removed the beans from the shells,
    parboil them for about one minute. Allow them to cool a bit, then slip the
    inner bean out of the skin. Add them to cooking risotto about 5-10 minutes
    before the rice is done. (The variable time is because I don't know how big
    the beans are, and larger beans take longer to cook. But once they're out of
    the inner skin, they don't need much more cooking at all.)

    You *will* be adding a bunch of grated parmesan right after it comes off the
    heat, right?

    Bob


  20. #20
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: fava beans

    Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > After you've removed the beans from the shells, parboil them
    > for about one minute. Allow them to cool a bit, then slip the
    > inner bean out of the skin. Add them to cooking risotto about
    > 5-10 minutes before the rice is done. (The variable time is
    > because I don't know how big the beans are, and larger beans
    > take longer to cook. But once they're out of the inner skin,
    > they don't need much more cooking at all.)


    That correlates with my experience of fresh favas taking about 8 minutes
    to cook to tenderness.

    > You *will* be adding a bunch of grated parmesan right after it
    > comes off the heat, right?


    I frequently make risotto without cheese. Comes out fine.

    (And I never ever use chicken broth. Thought I'd gratuitously
    throw that in....)


    Steve

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