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Thread: Fascinating reading

  1. #1
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Fascinating reading

    Hello All!

    This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth bringing to the
    notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found it fascinating and useful

    "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/ Malcolm."

    --


    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  2. #2
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading


    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    newsmlhl.499$[email protected]..
    > Hello All!
    >
    > This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth bringing to the
    > notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found it fascinating and useful
    >
    > "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/ Malcolm."
    >
    > --
    >
    >
    > James Silverton
    > Potomac, Maryland


    Nifty. Beer has been around even longer than I thought.
    Thanks for posting it.



  3. #3
    Dave Bell Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    James Silverton wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth bringing to the
    > notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found it fascinating and useful
    >
    > "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/ Malcolm."
    >


    Wow! A lot of research and work there.
    Thanks for posting it!

  4. #4
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > newsmlhl.499$[email protected]..
    >> Hello All!
    >>
    >> This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth bringing to the
    >> notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found it fascinating and useful
    >>
    >> "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/ Malcolm."
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >>
    >> James Silverton
    >> Potomac, Maryland

    >
    > Nifty. Beer has been around even longer than I thought.
    > Thanks for posting it.
    >


    I found it interesting to read that when the Pilgrims set off to the New
    World they took more beer than water. They were supposed to settle near
    the Hudson river but ended up coming ashore in MA because they ran out
    of beer.

  5. #5
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    Dave wrote on Sun, 01 Feb 2009 13:45:28 -0500:

    > Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >> "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> message newsmlhl.499$[email protected]..
    >>> Hello All!
    >>>
    >>> This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth
    >>> bringing to the notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found
    >>> it fascinating and useful
    >>>
    >>> "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/ Malcolm."
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> James Silverton
    >>> Potomac, Maryland

    >>
    >> Nifty. Beer has been around even longer than I thought.
    >> Thanks for posting it.


    >I found it interesting to read that when the Pilgrims set off to the
    >New World they took more beer than water. They were supposed to settle
    >near the Hudson river but ended up coming ashore in MA because they ran
    >out of beer.


    Talking about antiquity of beer, have you seen Dogfish Head's King Midas
    Brew, based on materials found in ancient Greek tombs?


    I like the story (seen elsewhere) that the Pilgrims had their map upside
    down and that is why the south end of Cape Cod is the "Upper Cape".

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  6. #6
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    On Sun, 01 Feb 2009 17:55:47 GMT, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hello All!
    >
    >This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth bringing to the
    >notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found it fascinating and useful
    >
    >"I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/ Malcolm."


    What a great site. Thanks so much for posting it.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 02/01

  7. #7
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    James Silverton wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth bringing to the
    > notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found it fascinating and useful
    >
    > "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/ Malcolm."
    >

    Yes, I love that site!

    --
    Jean B.

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I found it interesting to read that when the Pilgrims set off to the New
    > World they took more beer than water. They were supposed to settle near
    > the Hudson river but ended up coming ashore in MA because they ran out
    > of beer.


    Urban Legend. The captain was hoarding it.

    -sw

  9. #9
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> newsmlhl.499$eK2.87
    @nwrddc01.gnilink.net: in rec.food.cooking

    > Hello All!
    >
    > This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth bringing to the
    > notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found it fascinating and useful
    >
    > "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/ Malcolm."


    Thanks for the link. I browsed the food history faq link. Some interesting
    reading.

    Michael



    --
    “He who does not understand your silence will probably not understand your
    words.”
    ~Elbert Hubbard

    You can find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  10. #10
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    On Sun, 01 Feb 2009 22:45:09 GMT, James Silverton wrote:

    > Dave wrote on Sun, 01 Feb 2009 13:45:28 -0500:
    >
    >> Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>> "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>> message newsmlhl.499$[email protected]..
    >>>> Hello All!
    >>>>
    >>>> This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth
    >>>> bringing to the notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found
    >>>> it fascinating and useful
    >>>>
    >>>> "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/ Malcolm."
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>>
    >>>> James Silverton
    >>>> Potomac, Maryland
    >>>
    >>> Nifty. Beer has been around even longer than I thought.
    >>> Thanks for posting it.

    >
    >>I found it interesting to read that when the Pilgrims set off to the
    >>New World they took more beer than water. They were supposed to settle
    >>near the Hudson river but ended up coming ashore in MA because they ran
    >>out of beer.

    >
    > Talking about antiquity of beer, have you seen Dogfish Head's King Midas
    > Brew, based on materials found in ancient Greek tombs?
    >
    > I like the story (seen elsewhere) that the Pilgrims had their map upside
    > down and that is why the south end of Cape Cod is the "Upper Cape".


    i did see the entry for 'soft drinks in america, 1830.' clearly, that is
    when things started to go downhill. no more hard cider and beer at
    breakfast!

    your pal,
    george

  11. #11
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    On Sun, 01 Feb 2009 15:24:49 -0800, koko <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 01 Feb 2009 17:55:47 GMT, "James Silverton"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Hello All!
    >>
    >>This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth bringing to the
    >>notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found it fascinating and useful
    >>
    >>"I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/ Malcolm."

    >
    >What a great site. Thanks so much for posting it.
    >
    >koko


    Aye, this is great for us oldsters, who tend to see things in
    terms of timelines.

    Too bad rec.food.historic is largely moribund. It's a great
    subject area. For those of you who love Tannehill and
    food history, try finding a copy of "The Literary Gourmet",
    by somebody or other. Consists of famous writings describing
    food, and then researching and presenting dishes that were
    contemporary. It starts with the "bowl of pottage" from the
    Old Testament. My fave is from Moby Dick, the scene in
    which Ishmael and Queequeg go to eat at the TryPots Inn.

    Authentic chowder recipes of the day. And they are *good*.
    Q: Who puts mace in their chowder? (I do)

    Alex


  12. #12
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    In article <Dmlhl.499$[email protected]>,
    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth bringing to the
    > notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found it fascinating and useful
    >
    > "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/


    I see honey at 5500BC. I'll bet our knuckle dragging ancestors ate honey
    whenever they could along with a grasshopper or two. I'm not criticizing
    the site. Honey seems oddly placed.

    leo

  13. #13
    Default User Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    Leonard Blaisdell wrote:

    > In article <Dmlhl.499$[email protected]>,
    > "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > This was posted in uk.food+drink.misc and is well worth bringing to
    > > the notice of readers of r.food.cooking. I found it fascinating and
    > > useful
    > >
    > > "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/

    >
    > I see honey at 5500BC. I'll bet our knuckle dragging ancestors ate
    > honey whenever they could along with a grasshopper or two. I'm not
    > criticizing the site. Honey seems oddly placed.


    If you follow the link, it's clear they're talking about beekeeping,
    not finding wild honey. I'm sure humans ate wild apples before 8000 BC.




    Brian

    --
    If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
    won't shut up.
    -- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)

  14. #14
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Default User" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If you follow the link, it's clear they're talking about beekeeping,
    > not finding wild honey. I'm sure humans ate wild apples before 8000 BC.


    I knew there was an explantation. My link clicking finger was out of
    action because of an unfortunate incident a couple of minutes earlier
    involving a black widow, rattlesnake and two stampeding cattle combined
    with early onset senility.

    leo

  15. #15
    Default User Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    Leonard Blaisdell wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Default User" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > If you follow the link, it's clear they're talking about beekeeping,
    > > not finding wild honey. I'm sure humans ate wild apples before 8000
    > > BC.

    >
    > I knew there was an explantation. My link clicking finger was out of
    > action because of an unfortunate incident a couple of minutes earlier
    > involving a black widow, rattlesnake and two stampeding cattle
    > combined with early onset senility.


    But no beestings?



    Brian

    --
    If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
    won't shut up.
    -- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)

  16. #16
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Default User" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > But no beestings?


    Not a one. I keep my bees in my bonnet, and the cattle didn't knock my
    hat off.

    leo

  17. #17
    Denise in NH Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    Geez, now I'll never get any work done. Looks like a fun read. Thanks
    for posting this site.

    Denise


  18. #18
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    In article
    <[email protected] >,
    Leonard Blaisdell <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <Dmlhl.499$[email protected]>,
    > "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote:


    > > "I've just come across http://www.foodtimeline.org/

    >
    > I see honey at 5500BC. I'll bet our knuckle dragging ancestors ate honey
    > whenever they could along with a grasshopper or two. I'm not criticizing
    > the site. Honey seems oddly placed.


    I suspect that the bears discovered it before then, but just forgot to
    write it down in their daily journal.

    :-)

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  19. #19
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Fascinating reading

    On Mon, 02 Feb 2009 15:38:24 -0800, Leonard Blaisdell wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Default User" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> If you follow the link, it's clear they're talking about beekeeping,
    >> not finding wild honey. I'm sure humans ate wild apples before 8000 BC.

    >
    > I knew there was an explantation. My link clicking finger was out of
    > action because of an unfortunate incident a couple of minutes earlier
    > involving a black widow, rattlesnake and two stampeding cattle combined
    > with early onset senility.
    >
    > leo


    i hate it when that happens.

    your pal,
    blake

  20. #20
    cyberpurrs Guest

    Default John Kuthe Correction: it's St. Louis Co., MO


    Your picture is really easy to find, too. The one with the watermelons from
    2007?

    You're a dumbass, John,


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