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Thread: Farmer's Market disappointment

  1. #1
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Farmer's Market disappointment

    Our local Farmer's Market is open again. Selection is still sparse but
    there are still some good greens and asparagus to be enjoyed.

    A new vendor this year is a dairy farm about 20 miles from us. They have
    the usual milk, skim milk, and so forth, but they are also offering ice
    cream, that being one of my favorite treats. At $6 a quart, it is far more
    than the commercial brands, but if it is really good, it is worth the price.

    One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label and was shocked
    to find a list that came close to that of the inventory of a DuPont plant.
    It had red dye #40, artificial flavor, sodium benzoate, guar gum and another
    stabilizer that I don't recall. I told the owner I was disappointed.
    Premium brands us only milk, cream, sugar, vanilla, strawberries. He said
    the other stuff was needed so it could be kept frozen and transported.

    I go to the local market to get the best possible foods from local sources.
    Wholesome foods for healthy eating. He said the stuff is needed, but I just
    told him I was sorry he did not try to make a good product and walked away.


  2. #2
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >
    > Our local Farmer's Market is open again. Selection is still sparse but
    > there are still some good greens and asparagus to be enjoyed.
    >
    > A new vendor this year is a dairy farm about 20 miles from us. They have
    > the usual milk, skim milk, and so forth, but they are also offering ice
    > cream, that being one of my favorite treats. At $6 a quart, it is far more
    > than the commercial brands, but if it is really good, it is worth the price.
    >
    > One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label and was shocked
    > to find a list that came close to that of the inventory of a DuPont plant.
    > It had red dye #40, artificial flavor, sodium benzoate, guar gum and another
    > stabilizer that I don't recall. I told the owner I was disappointed.
    > Premium brands us only milk, cream, sugar, vanilla, strawberries. He said
    > the other stuff was needed so it could be kept frozen and transported.
    >
    > I go to the local market to get the best possible foods from local sources.
    > Wholesome foods for healthy eating. He said the stuff is needed, but I just
    > told him I was sorry he did not try to make a good product and walked away.


    That is a bummer - darn! It's definitely still early in the season, but
    not as bad as last month, eh?!

    Sky

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    On Thu, 20 May 2010 22:35:57 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

    > Our local Farmer's Market is open again. Selection is still sparse but
    > there are still some good greens and asparagus to be enjoyed.
    >
    > A new vendor this year is a dairy farm about 20 miles from us. They have
    > the usual milk, skim milk, and so forth, but they are also offering ice
    > cream, that being one of my favorite treats. At $6 a quart, it is far more
    > than the commercial brands, but if it is really good, it is worth the price.
    >
    > One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label and was shocked
    > to find a list that came close to that of the inventory of a DuPont plant.
    > It had red dye #40, artificial flavor, sodium benzoate, guar gum and another
    > stabilizer that I don't recall. I told the owner I was disappointed.
    > Premium brands us only milk, cream, sugar, vanilla, strawberries. He said
    > the other stuff was needed so it could be kept frozen and transported.
    >
    > I go to the local market to get the best possible foods from local sources.
    > Wholesome foods for healthy eating. He said the stuff is needed, but I just
    > told him I was sorry he did not try to make a good product and walked away.


    If you consider it worth the price, then I don't see the problem.

    Stabilizer is pretty common in ice cream (that's the only ingredient
    he was referring to with that excuse), and I'd venture to guess most
    of the other stuff came from a commercial strawberry slurry.

    -sw

  4. #4
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >> One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label and was
    >> shocked
    >> to find a list that came close to that of the inventory of a DuPont
    >> plant.
    >> It had red dye #40, artificial flavor, sodium benzoate, guar gum and
    >> another
    >> stabilizer that I don't recall. I told the owner I was disappointed.
    >> Premium brands us only milk, cream, sugar, vanilla, strawberries. He
    >> said
    >> the other stuff was needed so it could be kept frozen and transported.
    >>
    >> I go to the local market to get the best possible foods from local
    >> sources.
    >> Wholesome foods for healthy eating. He said the stuff is needed, but I
    >> just
    >> told him I was sorry he did not try to make a good product and walked
    >> away.

    >
    > If you consider it worth the price, then I don't see the problem.
    >
    > Stabilizer is pretty common in ice cream (that's the only ingredient
    > he was referring to with that excuse), and I'd venture to guess most
    > of the other stuff came from a commercial strawberry slurry.
    >
    > -sw


    It is not only not worth the price ($6/quart) , it is not worth eating at
    any price. There are plenty of good bands with no artificial colors and
    flavors for a lot less money. It may have come from a commercial slurry,
    but it is just not needed. I'd rather have Hagen Daaz, Ben & Jerry or
    Breyers for $2 for 1.5 quarts.


  5. #5
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    On Thu, 20 May 2010 22:35:57 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

    > One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label
    > and was shocked to find a list that came close to that of the
    > inventory of a DuPont plant. It had red dye #40, artificial
    > flavor, sodium benzoate, guar gum and another stabilizer that
    > I don't recall.


    You should rat on them to the farmers' market organizers.
    Most farmers' markets have rules about the stuff being
    sold having to be handmade by the vendor and not from a megafactory.
    Or if not, then they are a phony farmers' market anyway.

    Steve

  6. #6
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment


    "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ht4u7k$l9s$[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 20 May 2010 22:35:57 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >
    >> One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label
    >> and was shocked to find a list that came close to that of the
    >> inventory of a DuPont plant. It had red dye #40, artificial
    >> flavor, sodium benzoate, guar gum and another stabilizer that
    >> I don't recall.

    >
    > You should rat on them to the farmers' market organizers.
    > Most farmers' markets have rules about the stuff being
    > sold having to be handmade by the vendor and not from a megafactory.
    > Or if not, then they are a phony farmers' market anyway.
    >
    > Steve


    I'm hoping he sees the light, but I doubt it. He is not making any claims,
    but I just expect more from a local dairy.




  7. #7
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    On 2010-05-21, Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I go to the local market to get the best possible foods from local sources.
    > Wholesome foods for healthy eating. He said the stuff is needed, but I just
    > told him I was sorry he did not try to make a good product and walked away.


    He's selling mass production crap with his brand. Happens all the
    time.

    nb


  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    On Thu, 20 May 2010 23:19:34 -0400, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

    > "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >> If you consider it worth the price, then I don't see the problem.
    >>
    >> Stabilizer is pretty common in ice cream (that's the only ingredient
    >> he was referring to with that excuse), and I'd venture to guess most
    >> of the other stuff came from a commercial strawberry slurry.

    >
    > It is not only not worth the price ($6/quart) , it is not worth eating at
    > any price.


    Sorry. I missed the "IF" in "if it's worth the price" in your
    original post. At first glance I thought you said it was worth the
    price.

    > There are plenty of good bands with no artificial colors and
    > flavors for a lot less money. It may have come from a commercial slurry,
    > but it is just not needed. I'd rather have Hagen Daaz, Ben & Jerry or
    > Breyers for $2 for 1.5 quarts.


    I just bout 2 *pints* of Imagine Whirled Peace and Carmel Sutra on
    sale for $5 (usually about $3 each). That's one quart for $5. I
    wouldn't buy any ice cream priced at $2 for 1.5 quarts. That's Cool
    Whip price.

    -sw

  9. #9
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    Steve Pope wrote:
    >Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >
    >> One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label
    >> and was shocked to find a list that came close to that of the
    >> inventory of a DuPont plant. It had red dye #40, artificial
    >> flavor, sodium benzoate, guar gum and another stabilizer that
    >> I don't recall.

    >
    >You should rat on them to the farmers' market organizers.
    >Most farmers' markets have rules about the stuff being
    >sold having to be handmade by the vendor and not from a megafactory.
    >Or if not, then they are a phony farmers' market anyway.


    They'd like consumers to believe there are rulz, there are no rulz. Be
    well assured that ice cream was produced at a local factory under
    private label... this is common with all products, especially foods.

    I've explained several times in the past that "Farmer's Market"
    consession venders for the most part sell the same products/produce
    that are sold at your local stupidmarkets... some few sell what they
    themselves produce but the majority of consessioneers aren't farmers
    at all, they shop at the central produce wholesaler. If you want to
    support your local farmers shop at *Farm Stands*, erected by the side
    of the road directly in front of the proprietor's own farm, pretty
    much everything grown/produced on premises, but even then some produce
    is swapped with nearby farmers, with some products sold on
    consignment.

  10. #10
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > Our local Farmer's Market is open again. Selection is still sparse but
    > there are still some good greens and asparagus to be enjoyed.
    >
    > A new vendor this year is a dairy farm about 20 miles from us. They
    > have the usual milk, skim milk, and so forth, but they are also offering
    > ice cream, that being one of my favorite treats. At $6 a quart, it is
    > far more than the commercial brands, but if it is really good, it is
    > worth the price.
    >
    > One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label and was
    > shocked to find a list that came close to that of the inventory of a
    > DuPont plant. It had red dye #40, artificial flavor, sodium benzoate,
    > guar gum and another stabilizer that I don't recall. I told the owner I
    > was disappointed. Premium brands us only milk, cream, sugar, vanilla,
    > strawberries. He said the other stuff was needed so it could be kept
    > frozen and transported.
    >
    > I go to the local market to get the best possible foods from local
    > sources. Wholesome foods for healthy eating. He said the stuff is
    > needed, but I just told him I was sorry he did not try to make a good
    > product and walked away.


    Heh! You react to such things as I do. Even if one can debate
    the stabilizers, why the food coloring and artificial flavor?

    Here we have a really fine ice cream, and I was excited when it
    started turning up in various stores--until I read the label. I
    highly doubt that the items they make (or made?) at the shop have
    stabilizers in them. Hmmmm. If they are necessary, why do some
    brands ship etc. without any such thing added?

    --
    Jean B.

  11. #11
    George Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    On 5/21/2010 7:29 AM, brooklyn1 wrote:
    > Steve Pope wrote:
    >> Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>
    >>> One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label
    >>> and was shocked to find a list that came close to that of the
    >>> inventory of a DuPont plant. It had red dye #40, artificial
    >>> flavor, sodium benzoate, guar gum and another stabilizer that
    >>> I don't recall.

    >>
    >> You should rat on them to the farmers' market organizers.
    >> Most farmers' markets have rules about the stuff being
    >> sold having to be handmade by the vendor and not from a megafactory.
    >> Or if not, then they are a phony farmers' market anyway.

    >
    > They'd like consumers to believe there are rulz, there are no rulz. Be
    > well assured that ice cream was produced at a local factory under
    > private label... this is common with all products, especially foods.
    >
    > I've explained several times in the past that "Farmer's Market"
    > consession venders for the most part sell the same products/produce
    > that are sold at your local stupidmarkets... some few sell what they
    > themselves produce but the majority of consessioneers aren't farmers
    > at all, they shop at the central produce wholesaler. If you want to
    > support your local farmers shop at *Farm Stands*, erected by the side
    > of the road directly in front of the proprietor's own farm, pretty
    > much everything grown/produced on premises, but even then some produce
    > is swapped with nearby farmers, with some products sold on
    > consignment.


    You explained what? Are you omniscient? I know multiple farmers markets
    that really are farmers markets. Stuff that is sold there is
    grown/baked/made by the very folks who are selling it.

  12. #12
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment


    > On 5/21/2010 7:29 AM, brooklyn1 wrote:


    >> I've explained several times in the past that "Farmer's Market"
    >> consession venders for the most part sell the same products/produce
    >> that are sold at your local stupidmarkets... some few sell what they
    >> themselves produce but the majority of consessioneers aren't farmers
    >> at all, they shop at the central produce wholesaler. If you want to
    >> support your local farmers shop at *Farm Stands*, erected by the side
    >> of the road directly in front of the proprietor's own farm, pretty
    >> much everything grown/produced on premises, but even then some produce
    >> is swapped with nearby farmers, with some products sold on
    >> consignment.


    Unfortunately, that is happening less and less. When I lived in PA,
    many of the local Amish farm stands bought from the big produce
    suppliers in Philadelphia.... especially when their own crops had run
    out... or to add items that they didn't grow themselves.

    One funny example was the Amish family farm stand that sold "local
    produce" had a big sale... on bananas.

    I love living in the South, but I miss the farm stands of rural PA.
    Around here, the closest we come are the guys selling watermelons out of
    the back of a pick-up on the side of the road.

    George L

  13. #13
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment


    "George Leppla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    >>> I've explained several times in the past that "Farmer's Market"
    >>> consession venders for the most part sell the same products/produce
    >>> that are sold at your local stupidmarkets... some few sell what they
    >>> themselves produce but the majority of consessioneers aren't farmers
    >>> at all, they shop at the central produce wholesaler. If you want to
    >>> support your local farmers shop at *Farm Stands*, erected by the side
    >>> of the road directly in front of the proprietor's own farm, pretty
    >>> much everything grown/produced on premises, but even then some produce
    >>> is swapped with nearby farmers, with some products sold on
    >>> consignment.

    >
    > Unfortunately, that is happening less and less. When I lived in PA, many
    > of the local Amish farm stands bought from the big produce suppliers in
    > Philadelphia.... especially when their own crops had run out... or to add
    > items that they didn't grow themselves.
    >
    > One funny example was the Amish family farm stand that sold "local
    > produce" had a big sale... on bananas.
    >
    > I love living in the South, but I miss the farm stands of rural PA. Around
    > here, the closest we come are the guys selling watermelons out of the back
    > of a pick-up on the side of the road.
    >
    > George L


    We have a few varieties.

    The Farm Stand, that Sheldon pointed out, right in front of the farmer's
    house. Some backyard gardeners do that too.

    The Farmer's Market run by the state Dept. of Agriculture that has standards
    on what can be sold. You have to be your own source of grown product, baked
    goods, etc. The guys will also police themselves if someone would try to
    fake it. You won't see bananas, Texas watermelons and the like. Same core
    group have been selling there for 30 years.

    Then there are the Produce Stands that may have local grown, but also have
    the products bought from wholesalers. What you won't find is bargains.



  14. #14
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    George Leppla wrote:

    > I love living in the South, but I miss the farm stands of rural PA.
    > Around here, the closest we come are the guys selling watermelons out
    > of the back of a pick-up on the side of the road.


    We still have a few farm stands around, usually they are in front
    of large fields of corn. They have what they have, you can't
    count on them having green peppers/whatever every time you go.
    But if you go with an open mind, they always have some good
    produce to sell. That's how I found out how incredible fresh lima
    beans can be.

    nancy


  15. #15
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    On Fri, 21 May 2010 08:21:12 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >> Our local Farmer's Market is open again. Selection is still sparse but
    >> there are still some good greens and asparagus to be enjoyed.
    >>
    >> A new vendor this year is a dairy farm about 20 miles from us. They
    >> have the usual milk, skim milk, and so forth, but they are also offering
    >> ice cream, that being one of my favorite treats. At $6 a quart, it is
    >> far more than the commercial brands, but if it is really good, it is
    >> worth the price.
    >>
    >> One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label and was
    >> shocked to find a list that came close to that of the inventory of a
    >> DuPont plant. It had red dye #40, artificial flavor, sodium benzoate,
    >> guar gum and another stabilizer that I don't recall. I told the owner I
    >> was disappointed. Premium brands us only milk, cream, sugar, vanilla,
    >> strawberries. He said the other stuff was needed so it could be kept
    >> frozen and transported.
    >>
    >> I go to the local market to get the best possible foods from local
    >> sources. Wholesome foods for healthy eating. He said the stuff is
    >> needed, but I just told him I was sorry he did not try to make a good
    >> product and walked away.

    >
    >Heh! You react to such things as I do. Even if one can debate
    >the stabilizers, why the food coloring and artificial flavor?
    >
    >Here we have a really fine ice cream, and I was excited when it
    >started turning up in various stores--until I read the label. I
    >highly doubt that the items they make (or made?) at the shop have
    >stabilizers in them. Hmmmm. If they are necessary, why do some
    >brands ship etc. without any such thing added?


    I don't remember ever seeing a commercial ice cream that didn't
    contain a stabilizer, usually guar gum (a natural plant constituent),
    helps maintain the texture during temperature fluctuations. And just
    about all commercial red berry ice creams contain a dye in order to
    ensure a consistant color from batch to batch, typically beet juice.

  16. #16
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment


    Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >
    > Our local Farmer's Market is open again. Selection is still sparse but
    > there are still some good greens and asparagus to be enjoyed.
    >
    > A new vendor this year is a dairy farm about 20 miles from us. They have
    > the usual milk, skim milk, and so forth, but they are also offering ice
    > cream, that being one of my favorite treats. At $6 a quart, it is far more
    > than the commercial brands, but if it is really good, it is worth the price.
    >
    > One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label and was shocked
    > to find a list that came close to that of the inventory of a DuPont plant.
    > It had red dye #40, artificial flavor, sodium benzoate, guar gum and another
    > stabilizer that I don't recall. I told the owner I was disappointed.
    > Premium brands us only milk, cream, sugar, vanilla, strawberries. He said
    > the other stuff was needed so it could be kept frozen and transported.
    >
    > I go to the local market to get the best possible foods from local sources.
    > Wholesome foods for healthy eating. He said the stuff is needed, but I just
    > told him I was sorry he did not try to make a good product and walked away.


    Shady Glen dude, their two locations are pretty close to you I believe.
    The Grape Nut ice cream is particularly good.

  17. #17
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment


    "brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > I don't remember ever seeing a commercial ice cream that didn't
    > contain a stabilizer, usually guar gum (a natural plant constituent),
    > helps maintain the texture during temperature fluctuations. And just
    > about all commercial red berry ice creams contain a dye in order to
    > ensure a consistant color from batch to batch, typically beet juice.


    Until recently, Breyers had no stabilizers or gums, no artificial anything.
    They made a big deal that the vanilla ice cream had milk, cream sugar,
    vanilla. Then, motivated by profit I'm sure, they added carrageen to it.
    The original Breyers was a family owned company in the Philadelphia area,
    but later was sold to Sealtest, Good Humor, Kraft, Unilever, maybe others.
    Not as good as it used to be, but still not preservatives and artificial
    flavors in the black packages.



  18. #18
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    Ed Pawlowski wrote (snipped):

    > Our local Farmer's Market is open again.


    > A new vendor this year is a dairy farm about 20 miles from us. They
    > have the usual milk, skim milk, and so forth, but they are also
    > offering ice cream, that being one of my favorite treats.


    > One of the flavors was strawberry. I looked at the label and was
    > shocked to find a list that came close to that of the inventory of a
    > DuPont plant. It had red dye #40, artificial flavor, sodium benzoate,
    > guar gum and another stabilizer that I don't recall.


    As him where the ice cream is made - might just be that it's his dairy
    product, delivered to somewhere and turned into ice cream, then
    delivered back to him. Did he really set up for producing ice cream in
    quantity at his farm?

    -S-



  19. #19
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    George <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 5/21/2010 7:29 AM, brooklyn1 wrote:


    >> I've explained several times in the past that "Farmer's Market"
    >> consession venders for the most part sell the same products/produce
    >> that are sold at your local stupidmarkets...


    Probably true in New York City.

    >> themselves produce but the majority of consessioneers aren't farmers
    >> at all, they shop at the central produce wholesaler. If you want to
    >> support your local farmers shop at *Farm Stands*, erected by the side
    >> of the road directly in front of the proprietor's own farm, pretty
    >> much everything grown/produced on premises, but even then some produce
    >> is swapped with nearby farmers, with some products sold on
    >> consignment.


    >You explained what? Are you omniscient? I know multiple farmers markets
    >that really are farmers markets. Stuff that is sold there is
    >grown/baked/made by the very folks who are selling it.


    Maybe Wal-Mart is operating a chain of farmers markets now. There
    seems to be 80,000 of them in the U.S. at this point.


    Steve

  20. #20
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Farmer's Market disappointment

    On Fri, 21 May 2010 11:28:28 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> I don't remember ever seeing a commercial ice cream that didn't
    >> contain a stabilizer, usually guar gum (a natural plant constituent),
    >> helps maintain the texture during temperature fluctuations. And just
    >> about all commercial red berry ice creams contain a dye in order to
    >> ensure a consistant color from batch to batch, typically beet juice.

    >
    >Until recently, Breyers had no stabilizers or gums, no artificial anything.
    >They made a big deal that the vanilla ice cream had milk, cream sugar,
    >vanilla. Then, motivated by profit I'm sure, they added carrageen to it.
    >The original Breyers was a family owned company in the Philadelphia area,
    >but later was sold to Sealtest, Good Humor, Kraft, Unilever, maybe others.
    >Not as good as it used to be, but still not preservatives and artificial
    >flavors in the black packages.


    Guar gum and carrageenan are not artificial... they're as natural
    plant products as vanilla beans and strawberries. To claim adding
    natural plant gums to cream is artificial then one can make the same
    argument that adding strawberries/vanilla to cream is artificial. And
    adding sugar, especially refined sugar, is certainly artificial.
    Adding natural plant gums to ice cream is as natural as adding pectin
    to jam. Perhaps the real artificial ingredient in commercial ice
    creams is all the air they whip in and still call it a half gallon. I
    think that if you weigh a half gallon of cream and a half gallon of
    Bryer's ice cream you'll discover that calling it ice cream is
    fraudulent.

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