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Thread: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

  1. #1
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    From The Good Housekeeping Cookbook, circa 1978.

    Refrigerator Rolls

    6 to 6-1/2 c. all purpose flour
    1/2 c. sugar
    2 tsp. salt
    2 pkgs. active dry yeast
    1/2 c. butter, softenend
    2 c. hot water
    1 egg
    salad oil

    Early in Day or up to 1 Week ahead:

    1. In large bowl, combine 2-1/4 c. flour, sugar, salt & yeast. Add butter.
    With a hand-mixer at low speed, gradually beat in 2 c. hot water (120
    degrees). Add egg and increase speed to medium. Beat 2 minutes,
    occasionally scraping the bowl. With a wooden spoon, stir in enough
    additional flour (about 2-1/2 cups) to make a soft dough.

    2. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and
    elastic, about 10 minutes. Shape into a large ball and place in a large
    greased bowl, turning dough so all is greased. Cover with a towel and let
    rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1-1/2 hours.

    3. Punch down dough and push edges of dough to the center. Turn dough over
    and brush with salad oil. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and
    refrigerate, punching dough down occasionally, until ready to use.

    About 2 hours before serving:

    4. Remove dough from refrigerator. Grease a 15X10 open roasting pan. Cut
    the dough into 30 equal pieces; shape into balls and place in pan. Cover
    with a towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled (again about 1-1/2
    hours).

    5. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden brown.
    Brush rolls with melted butter to glaze the tops. Carefully remove from pan
    and serve immediately. Makes 2&1/2 dozen rolls.

    Jill


  2. #2
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > 5. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden
    > brown. Brush rolls with melted butter to glaze the tops. Carefully
    > remove from pan and serve immediately. Makes 2&1/2 dozen rolls.
    >
    > Jill



    Jill,

    I can just see me immediately going at 2-1/2 dozen rolls!

    I COULD probably do it!

    I could.

    Maybe.

    Best,

    Andy

  3. #3
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    Jill wrote:

    > From The Good Housekeeping Cookbook, circa 1978.
    >
    > Refrigerator Rolls
    >
    > 6 to 6-1/2 c. all purpose flour
    > 1/2 c. sugar
    > 2 tsp. salt
    > 2 pkgs. active dry yeast
    > 1/2 c. butter, softenend
    > 2 c. hot water
    > 1 egg
    > salad oil
    >
    > Early in Day or up to 1 Week ahead:
    >
    > 1. In large bowl, combine 2-1/4 c. flour, sugar, salt & yeast. Add
    > butter. With a hand-mixer at low speed, gradually beat in 2 c. hot water
    > (120 degrees). Add egg and increase speed to medium. Beat 2 minutes,
    > occasionally scraping the bowl. With a wooden spoon, stir in enough
    > additional flour (about 2-1/2 cups) to make a soft dough.
    >
    > 2. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and
    > elastic, about 10 minutes. Shape into a large ball and place in a large
    > greased bowl, turning dough so all is greased. Cover with a towel and let
    > rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1-1/2 hours.
    >
    > 3. Punch down dough and push edges of dough to the center. Turn dough
    > over and brush with salad oil. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and
    > refrigerate, punching dough down occasionally, until ready to use.
    >
    > About 2 hours before serving:
    >
    > 4. Remove dough from refrigerator. Grease a 15X10 open roasting pan.
    > Cut the dough into 30 equal pieces; shape into balls and place in pan.
    > Cover with a towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled (again about
    > 1-1/2 hours).
    >
    > 5. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden
    > brown. Brush rolls with melted butter to glaze the tops. Carefully remove
    > from pan and serve immediately. Makes 2&1/2 dozen rolls.


    The problem with following that recipe for a holiday meal is that two hours
    before dinner, the oven is usually in use for something which wouldn't take
    kindly to being subjected to 425-degree heat.

    Bob



  4. #4
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 20:23:35 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >The problem with following that recipe for a holiday meal is that two hours
    >before dinner, the oven is usually in use for something which wouldn't take
    >kindly to being subjected to 425-degree heat.


    I have this same recipe...and it doesn't take that long to bake. I
    got it from some magazine years and years ago, and only realized a few
    years ago that Jill and I had the same recipe.

    And being from the South, we like our hot breads HOT..so I personally
    would bake them immediately before dinner so they come to the table
    immediately from the oven.

    Christine

    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  5. #5
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 20:23:35 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >The problem with following that recipe for a holiday meal is that two hours
    >before dinner, the oven is usually in use for something which wouldn't take
    >kindly to being subjected to 425-degree heat.
    >
    >Bob


    If you are talking about rising, it really doesn't need to be that
    warm. I just put them somewhere near the stove..and they do just
    fine.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  6. #6
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 23:36:19 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Wouldn't the yeast die or run out of steam or not do whetever it's
    >supposed to do after punching down dough for one week in the
    >fridge?


    No, the dough is just fine for that many days. I acquired this
    recipes many years ago, and only found out later that Jill had the
    same recipe.

    I have made it several times. I usually make up the dough a few days
    in advance, and then form the rolls and let them rise an hour or two
    before dinner. They rise just fine.

    Same principal as retarding pizza dough or the artisan bread
    doughs.... Only uses more yeast, and more nutrients for the yeast.

    Christine

    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  7. #7
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Sat, 6 Nov 2010 00:01:11 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >Does the taste or texture improve after 4-days in the fridge?
    >
    >-sw


    I personally think the taste is improved, but then again I am fan of
    slow rising breads and how they affect flavor. As to the texture, I
    really cannot remember. It has been some time since I have made
    these.

    Maybe I will try them again soon, and get back to you. I suspect that
    to really determine that, I should make some rolls the first day the
    dough is made, and then again a few days later.

    Maybe my memory is faulty..it will be interesting to find out if my
    tastes have changed..

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 17:47:04 -0400, jmcquown wrote:

    > From The Good Housekeeping Cookbook, circa 1978.

    ....
    > salad oil


    Why did they have to specifically say "salad oil"? What other
    kinds of oil were there back then? Would dumb people assume motor
    oil?

    > Early in Day or up to 1 Week ahead:


    Wouldn't the yeast die or run out of steam or not do whetever it's
    supposed to do after punching down dough for one week in the
    fridge?

    I left some dinner rolls to rise in the oven and forgot about them
    until 4 days later. They were quite dead.

    -sw

  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 20:23:35 -0700, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > The problem with following that recipe for a holiday meal is that two hours
    > before dinner, the oven is usually in use for something which wouldn't take
    > kindly to being subjected to 425-degree heat.


    They only take 15-20 minutes to bake, which the time I have
    reserved for bread since I have taken the roast out to rest for 20
    minutes before carving.

    And since the oven is already at ~300F, it a perfect time to crank
    it up for baking bread (and/or carmelizing sweet potatoes or
    toasting green bean casserole - which I don't cook or eat, BTW).

    -sw

  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Fri, 05 Nov 2010 22:39:14 -0600, Christine Dabney wrote:

    > On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 23:36:19 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>Wouldn't the yeast die or run out of steam or not do whetever it's
    >>supposed to do after punching down dough for one week in the
    >>fridge?

    >
    > No, the dough is just fine for that many days. I acquired this
    > recipes many years ago, and only found out later that Jill had the
    > same recipe.
    >
    > I have made it several times. I usually make up the dough a few days
    > in advance, and then form the rolls and let them rise an hour or two
    > before dinner. They rise just fine.


    Does the taste or texture improve after 4-days in the fridge?

    -sw

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Fri, 05 Nov 2010 23:15:27 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 6 Nov 2010 00:01:11 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    > >Does the taste or texture improve after 4-days in the fridge?
    > >
    > >-sw

    >
    > I personally think the taste is improved, but then again I am fan of
    > slow rising breads and how they affect flavor. As to the texture, I
    > really cannot remember. It has been some time since I have made
    > these.
    >
    > Maybe I will try them again soon, and get back to you. I suspect that
    > to really determine that, I should make some rolls the first day the
    > dough is made, and then again a few days later.
    >
    > Maybe my memory is faulty..it will be interesting to find out if my
    > tastes have changed..
    >

    Dough that's kept in the refrigerator overnight (or longer) develops a
    wonderful yeasty flavor and rises just fine when it hits warmer air.
    Just punch it down put it back in the refrigerator if you're not ready
    to use it at the moment.


    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  12. #12
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls



    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:b7uuhlxaxzqp$.[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 05 Nov 2010 22:39:14 -0600, Christine Dabney wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 23:36:19 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>Wouldn't the yeast die or run out of steam or not do whetever it's
    >>>supposed to do after punching down dough for one week in the
    >>>fridge?

    >>
    >> No, the dough is just fine for that many days. I acquired this
    >> recipes many years ago, and only found out later that Jill had the
    >> same recipe.
    >>
    >> I have made it several times. I usually make up the dough a few days
    >> in advance, and then form the rolls and let them rise an hour or two
    >> before dinner. They rise just fine.

    >
    > Does the taste or texture improve after 4-days in the fridge?


    I will agree with Christine that the flavour does improve and very much so
    with sourdough. I used to leave my sourdough for up to a week in the
    fridge.
    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  13. #13
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Fri, 05 Nov 2010 23:15:27 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I personally think the taste is improved, but then again I am fan of
    >slow rising breads and how they affect flavor. As to the texture, I
    >really cannot remember. It has been some time since I have made
    >these.


    Basically, the same recipe Christine...and I got mine out of Southern
    Living. And as the name implies....

    @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

    Overnight Yeast Rolls

    Blog Recipe, breads

    3 tablespoon yeast
    1 cup water, warm 105F.
    1 cup shortening
    1 cup sugar
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 cup water, boiling
    2 large eggs
    6 cup flour

    Recipe continues...


    http://whstoneman.blogspot.com/2009/11/dinner-roll.html



    The Fine Art of Cooking involves personal choice.
    Many preferences, ingredients, and procedures may not
    be consistent with what you know to be true.
    As with any recipe, you may find your personal
    intervention will be necessary. Bon Appétit!

    http://whstoneman.blogspot.com

  14. #14
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >
    >> The problem with following that recipe for a holiday meal is that two hours
    >> before dinner, the oven is usually in use for something which wouldn't take
    >> kindly to being subjected to 425-degree heat.

    >
    >They only take 15-20 minutes to bake, which the time I have
    >reserved for bread since I have taken the roast out to rest for 20
    >minutes before carving.
    >
    >And since the oven is already at ~300F, it a perfect time to crank
    >it up for baking bread (and/or carmelizing sweet potatoes or
    >toasting green bean casserole - which I don't cook or eat, BTW).
    >
    >-sw


    'Zactly... and that's why dinner *rolls*, something that can be baked
    in the time the main course rests while folks enjoy a
    cocktail/appetizer... stupidmarket refrigerator cases are filled with
    quick baking dinner roll tubes of every sort. And many folks have two
    ovens... and nowadays portable countertop convection ovens are dirt
    cheap... I can't imagine someone who claims to do a lot of
    entertaining wouldn't have a second oven.

  15. #15
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Fri, 05 Nov 2010 23:15:27 -0600, Christine Dabney
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 6 Nov 2010 00:01:11 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Does the taste or texture improve after 4-days in the fridge?
    >>
    >>-sw

    >
    >I personally think the taste is improved, but then again I am fan of
    >slow rising breads and how they affect flavor.


    Can also be frozen.

  16. #16
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 20:23:35 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    > <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >
    >>The problem with following that recipe for a holiday meal is that two
    >>hours
    >>before dinner, the oven is usually in use for something which wouldn't
    >>take
    >>kindly to being subjected to 425-degree heat.
    >>
    >>Bob

    >
    > If you are talking about rising, it really doesn't need to be that
    > warm. I just put them somewhere near the stove..and they do just
    > fine.
    >
    > Christine
    > --
    > http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com



    True... and I didn't mention anything about holidays, did I? I like hot
    dinner rolls with just about any old meal

    Jill


  17. #17
    BigBadBubba Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:4cd4ca24$0$749$c3e8da3$[email protected] .com...
    > Jill wrote:
    >
    >> From The Good Housekeeping Cookbook, circa 1978.
    >>
    >> Refrigerator Rolls
    >>
    >> 6 to 6-1/2 c. all purpose flour
    >> 1/2 c. sugar
    >> 2 tsp. salt
    >> 2 pkgs. active dry yeast
    >> 1/2 c. butter, softenend
    >> 2 c. hot water
    >> 1 egg
    >> salad oil
    >>
    >> Early in Day or up to 1 Week ahead:
    >>
    >> 1. In large bowl, combine 2-1/4 c. flour, sugar, salt & yeast. Add
    >> butter. With a hand-mixer at low speed, gradually beat in 2 c. hot water
    >> (120 degrees). Add egg and increase speed to medium. Beat 2 minutes,
    >> occasionally scraping the bowl. With a wooden spoon, stir in enough
    >> additional flour (about 2-1/2 cups) to make a soft dough.
    >>
    >> 2. Turn dough onto lightly floured surface and knead until smooth and
    >> elastic, about 10 minutes. Shape into a large ball and place in a large
    >> greased bowl, turning dough so all is greased. Cover with a towel and let
    >> rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1-1/2 hours.
    >>
    >> 3. Punch down dough and push edges of dough to the center. Turn dough
    >> over and brush with salad oil. Cover bowl tightly with plastic wrap and
    >> refrigerate, punching dough down occasionally, until ready to use.
    >>
    >> About 2 hours before serving:
    >>
    >> 4. Remove dough from refrigerator. Grease a 15X10 open roasting pan.
    >> Cut the dough into 30 equal pieces; shape into balls and place in pan.
    >> Cover with a towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled (again
    >> about
    >> 1-1/2 hours).
    >>
    >> 5. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden
    >> brown. Brush rolls with melted butter to glaze the tops. Carefully
    >> remove
    >> from pan and serve immediately. Makes 2&1/2 dozen rolls.

    >
    > The problem with following that recipe for a holiday meal is that two
    > hours
    > before dinner, the oven is usually in use for something which wouldn't
    > take
    > kindly to being subjected to 425-degree heat.
    >
    > Bob
    >
    >

    That's when I would call one of my smokers into duty. With a really clean
    burning fire. Great for biscuits and rolls. Adds just a tiny bit of smoke.
    I imagine it's very similar to the old wood burning stove/ovens.



    --- news://freenews.netfront.net/ - complaints: [email protected] ---

  18. #18
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1eg0sch0a05mb$.[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 5 Nov 2010 17:47:04 -0400, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    >> From The Good Housekeeping Cookbook, circa 1978.

    > ...
    >> salad oil

    >
    > Why did they have to specifically say "salad oil"? What other
    > kinds of oil were there back then? Would dumb people assume motor
    > oil?
    >

    If you don't know anything about cooking who knows what people may have
    used? Back then "salad oil" could have meant anything from Wesson corn oil
    to Crisco. Or (these days) canola oil. The point, I suppose, was not to
    use olive oil which is too heavy for this dough.

    >> Early in Day or up to 1 Week ahead:

    >
    > Wouldn't the yeast die or run out of steam or not do whetever it's
    > supposed to do after punching down dough for one week in the
    > fridge?
    >
    > I left some dinner rolls to rise in the oven and forgot about them
    > until 4 days later. They were quite dead.
    >
    > -sw


    Apparently you didn't use the right recipe or the right yeast. This dough
    gains a nice yeasty taste as it matures. I've made these rolls many times
    since 1978 and they always turn out well. Don't knock it until you try it.

    Jill


  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    On Sat, 6 Nov 2010 12:02:32 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Don't knock it until you try it.


    You know he will. That's his nature.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  20. #20
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Fantastic Dinner Rolls

    Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> 5. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden
    >> brown. Brush rolls with melted butter to glaze the tops. Carefully
    >> remove from pan and serve immediately. Makes 2&1/2 dozen rolls.
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    >
    > Jill,
    >
    > I can just see me immediately going at 2-1/2 dozen rolls!
    >
    > I COULD probably do it!
    >
    > I could.
    >
    > Maybe.
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy



    Jill,

    Thinking not much about it... put sausage gravy on them?

    Definitely!!!

    Gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone,
    gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone,
    gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone, gone!!!

    See? I told ya!!!

    <smootch>

    I'm a man of my word.

    Uhh... oh...

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