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Thread: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

  1. #1
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* I had mostly (I thought)
    copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."

    So, the recipes that "didn't make the cut" from the "Kitchen
    Scrapbook" and her box of 3 x 5" cards to my recipe software
    languished in a cupboard along with their "owners" until I just dug
    'em out about a half hour ago. If I ever get a chance to actually
    retire (attempt #3 didn't work either - my boss just keeps sweetening
    the deal), I am going to input every last one of those recipes into my
    recipe software in a separate category, and "publish" a book for my
    close kith and kin.

    Most of the recipes in my recipe software database have contributors
    such as "Bon Appetit," "Koko@rfc," "LA Times," etc. I still have a
    number that note, "Grandmother Hopkins' Biscuit Recipe," "Great
    Grandmother Marken's Nut Bread," "Auntie Ree's Meatloaf," etc., but it
    doesn't have the same smile-value as seeing these recipes written in
    my mother's handwriting.

    And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    fondly remembered relatives.

    --

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    "Some weasel took the cork out of my lunch!"

    -- W.C. Fields

  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On Thu 22 May 2008 08:01:59p, Terry Pulliam Burd told us...

    > Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    > recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* I had mostly (I thought)
    > copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    > same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    > looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    > a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    > friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    > Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    > Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    > Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."
    >
    > So, the recipes that "didn't make the cut" from the "Kitchen
    > Scrapbook" and her box of 3 x 5" cards to my recipe software
    > languished in a cupboard along with their "owners" until I just dug
    > 'em out about a half hour ago. If I ever get a chance to actually
    > retire (attempt #3 didn't work either - my boss just keeps sweetening
    > the deal), I am going to input every last one of those recipes into my
    > recipe software in a separate category, and "publish" a book for my
    > close kith and kin.
    >
    > Most of the recipes in my recipe software database have contributors
    > such as "Bon Appetit," "Koko@rfc," "LA Times," etc. I still have a
    > number that note, "Grandmother Hopkins' Biscuit Recipe," "Great
    > Grandmother Marken's Nut Bread," "Auntie Ree's Meatloaf," etc., but it
    > doesn't have the same smile-value as seeing these recipes written in
    > my mother's handwriting.
    >
    > And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    > in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    > scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    > my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    > which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    > retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    > fondly remembered relatives.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    I can certainly identify with the feeling. Years before there were PCs, I
    photocopied all my mother's and relative's recipes and recipe cards and put
    the pages in vinyl page protectors in 3-ring binders. Somehow I amassed 4
    3-inch ring binders of these. Most have never made it to my PC, since it's
    easy to browse through the binders.

    When my mother passed away I inherited her cookbooks, recipe collection and
    a lovely cedar card file box filled with the recipes on cards. I cherished
    having these. Unfortunately, David accidentally threw out the box along
    with what he thought was a box of rubbish. I still wish I had the cards
    and the box for sentimental reasons, but at least I have a "real" image of
    them.

    One of these days I would like to enter them all into MasterCook, though,
    just for ease of searching and use.


    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Thursday, 05(V)/22(XXII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Feast of Corpus Christi
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    3dys 2hrs 1mins 52secs
    -------------------------------------------
    If Windows sucked, it would be good
    for something!
    -------------------------------------------

  3. #3
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On Thu 22 May 2008 08:01:59p, Terry Pulliam Burd told us...

    > Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    > recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* I had mostly (I thought)
    > copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    > same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    > looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    > a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    > friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    > Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    > Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    > Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."
    >
    > So, the recipes that "didn't make the cut" from the "Kitchen
    > Scrapbook" and her box of 3 x 5" cards to my recipe software
    > languished in a cupboard along with their "owners" until I just dug
    > 'em out about a half hour ago. If I ever get a chance to actually
    > retire (attempt #3 didn't work either - my boss just keeps sweetening
    > the deal), I am going to input every last one of those recipes into my
    > recipe software in a separate category, and "publish" a book for my
    > close kith and kin.
    >
    > Most of the recipes in my recipe software database have contributors
    > such as "Bon Appetit," "Koko@rfc," "LA Times," etc. I still have a
    > number that note, "Grandmother Hopkins' Biscuit Recipe," "Great
    > Grandmother Marken's Nut Bread," "Auntie Ree's Meatloaf," etc., but it
    > doesn't have the same smile-value as seeing these recipes written in
    > my mother's handwriting.
    >
    > And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    > in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    > scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    > my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    > which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    > retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    > fondly remembered relatives.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    I can certainly identify with the feeling. Years before there were PCs, I
    photocopied all my mother's and relative's recipes and recipe cards and put
    the pages in vinyl page protectors in 3-ring binders. Somehow I amassed 4
    3-inch ring binders of these. Most have never made it to my PC, since it's
    easy to browse through the binders.

    When my mother passed away I inherited her cookbooks, recipe collection and
    a lovely cedar card file box filled with the recipes on cards. I cherished
    having these. Unfortunately, David accidentally threw out the box along
    with what he thought was a box of rubbish. I still wish I had the cards
    and the box for sentimental reasons, but at least I have a "real" image of
    them.

    One of these days I would like to enter them all into MasterCook, though,
    just for ease of searching and use.


    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Thursday, 05(V)/22(XXII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Feast of Corpus Christi
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    3dys 2hrs 1mins 52secs
    -------------------------------------------
    If Windows sucked, it would be good
    for something!
    -------------------------------------------

  4. #4
    modom (palindrome guy) Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On Thu, 22 May 2008 20:01:59 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    >recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* I had mostly (I thought)
    >copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    >same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    >looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    >a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    >friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    >Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    >Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    >Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."
    >

    D has a notebook in the kitchen with a more modest collection of
    family recipes. My favorite is the stained and faded recipe for
    jailhouse chili, not to say that any of our forebears had the
    opportunity to sample the original in situ.

    >And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    >in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    >scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    >my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    >which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    >retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    >fondly remembered relatives.


    It would be English pea salad around here.

    Nice post, thanks.
    --

    modom
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  5. #5
    modom (palindrome guy) Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On Thu, 22 May 2008 20:01:59 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    >recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* I had mostly (I thought)
    >copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    >same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    >looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    >a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    >friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    >Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    >Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    >Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."
    >

    D has a notebook in the kitchen with a more modest collection of
    family recipes. My favorite is the stained and faded recipe for
    jailhouse chili, not to say that any of our forebears had the
    opportunity to sample the original in situ.

    >And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    >in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    >scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    >my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    >which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    >retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    >fondly remembered relatives.


    It would be English pea salad around here.

    Nice post, thanks.
    --

    modom
    ** Posted from http://www.teranews.com **

  6. #6
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On May 22, 8:01*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    > Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    > recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* *I had mostly (I thought)
    > copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    > same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    > looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    > a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    > friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    > Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    > Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    > Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."
    >
    > So, the recipes that "didn't make the cut" from the "Kitchen
    > Scrapbook" and her box of 3 x 5" cards to my recipe software
    > languished in a cupboard along with their "owners" until I just dug
    > 'em out about a half hour ago. If I ever get a chance to actually
    > retire (attempt #3 didn't work either - my boss just keeps sweetening
    > the deal), I am going to input every last one of those recipes into my
    > recipe software in a separate category, and "publish" a book for my
    > close kith and kin.
    >
    > Most of the recipes in my recipe software database have contributors
    > such as "Bon Appetit," "Koko@rfc," "LA Times," etc. I still have a
    > number that note, "Grandmother Hopkins' Biscuit Recipe," "Great
    > Grandmother Marken's Nut Bread," "Auntie Ree's Meatloaf," etc., but it
    > doesn't have the same smile-value as seeing these recipes written in
    > my mother's handwriting.
    >
    > And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    > in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    > scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    > my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    > which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    > retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    > fondly remembered relatives.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >
    > "Some weasel took the cork out of my lunch!"
    >
    > * * * * -- W.C. Fields


    I have a lot of my grandma's recipes- it's a little eerie looking at
    the ones she hand wrote. Among my favorites is her ravioli filling
    recipe. It's kinda comforing to look thru them, ya know??

  7. #7
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On May 22, 8:01*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@meatloaf.net> wrote:
    > Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    > recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* *I had mostly (I thought)
    > copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    > same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    > looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    > a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    > friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    > Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    > Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    > Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."
    >
    > So, the recipes that "didn't make the cut" from the "Kitchen
    > Scrapbook" and her box of 3 x 5" cards to my recipe software
    > languished in a cupboard along with their "owners" until I just dug
    > 'em out about a half hour ago. If I ever get a chance to actually
    > retire (attempt #3 didn't work either - my boss just keeps sweetening
    > the deal), I am going to input every last one of those recipes into my
    > recipe software in a separate category, and "publish" a book for my
    > close kith and kin.
    >
    > Most of the recipes in my recipe software database have contributors
    > such as "Bon Appetit," "Koko@rfc," "LA Times," etc. I still have a
    > number that note, "Grandmother Hopkins' Biscuit Recipe," "Great
    > Grandmother Marken's Nut Bread," "Auntie Ree's Meatloaf," etc., but it
    > doesn't have the same smile-value as seeing these recipes written in
    > my mother's handwriting.
    >
    > And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    > in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    > scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    > my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    > which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    > retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    > fondly remembered relatives.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >
    > "Some weasel took the cork out of my lunch!"
    >
    > * * * * -- W.C. Fields


    I have a lot of my grandma's recipes- it's a little eerie looking at
    the ones she hand wrote. Among my favorites is her ravioli filling
    recipe. It's kinda comforing to look thru them, ya know??

  8. #8
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Thu 22 May 2008 08:01:59p, Terry Pulliam Burd told us...
    >
    >> Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    >> recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* I had mostly (I thought)
    >> copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    >> same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    >> looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    >> a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    >> friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    >> Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    >> Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    >> Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."
    >>
    >> So, the recipes that "didn't make the cut" from the "Kitchen
    >> Scrapbook" and her box of 3 x 5" cards to my recipe software
    >> languished in a cupboard along with their "owners" until I just dug
    >> 'em out about a half hour ago. If I ever get a chance to actually
    >> retire (attempt #3 didn't work either - my boss just keeps sweetening
    >> the deal), I am going to input every last one of those recipes into my
    >> recipe software in a separate category, and "publish" a book for my
    >> close kith and kin.
    >>
    >> Most of the recipes in my recipe software database have contributors
    >> such as "Bon Appetit," "Koko@rfc," "LA Times," etc. I still have a
    >> number that note, "Grandmother Hopkins' Biscuit Recipe," "Great
    >> Grandmother Marken's Nut Bread," "Auntie Ree's Meatloaf," etc., but it
    >> doesn't have the same smile-value as seeing these recipes written in
    >> my mother's handwriting.
    >>
    >> And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    >> in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    >> scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    >> my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    >> which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    >> retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    >> fondly remembered relatives.
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    >
    > I can certainly identify with the feeling. Years before there were PCs, I
    > photocopied all my mother's and relative's recipes and recipe cards and put
    > the pages in vinyl page protectors in 3-ring binders. Somehow I amassed 4
    > 3-inch ring binders of these. Most have never made it to my PC, since it's
    > easy to browse through the binders.
    >
    > When my mother passed away I inherited her cookbooks, recipe collection and
    > a lovely cedar card file box filled with the recipes on cards. I cherished
    > having these. Unfortunately, David accidentally threw out the box along
    > with what he thought was a box of rubbish. I still wish I had the cards
    > and the box for sentimental reasons, but at least I have a "real" image of
    > them.
    >
    > One of these days I would like to enter them all into MasterCook, though,
    > just for ease of searching and use.
    >
    >

    OMG! How painful that must have been--and still be. Yikes!!!!

    --
    Jean B.

  9. #9
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Thu 22 May 2008 08:01:59p, Terry Pulliam Burd told us...
    >
    >> Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    >> recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* I had mostly (I thought)
    >> copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    >> same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    >> looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    >> a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    >> friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    >> Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    >> Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    >> Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."
    >>
    >> So, the recipes that "didn't make the cut" from the "Kitchen
    >> Scrapbook" and her box of 3 x 5" cards to my recipe software
    >> languished in a cupboard along with their "owners" until I just dug
    >> 'em out about a half hour ago. If I ever get a chance to actually
    >> retire (attempt #3 didn't work either - my boss just keeps sweetening
    >> the deal), I am going to input every last one of those recipes into my
    >> recipe software in a separate category, and "publish" a book for my
    >> close kith and kin.
    >>
    >> Most of the recipes in my recipe software database have contributors
    >> such as "Bon Appetit," "Koko@rfc," "LA Times," etc. I still have a
    >> number that note, "Grandmother Hopkins' Biscuit Recipe," "Great
    >> Grandmother Marken's Nut Bread," "Auntie Ree's Meatloaf," etc., but it
    >> doesn't have the same smile-value as seeing these recipes written in
    >> my mother's handwriting.
    >>
    >> And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    >> in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    >> scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    >> my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    >> which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    >> retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    >> fondly remembered relatives.
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    >
    > I can certainly identify with the feeling. Years before there were PCs, I
    > photocopied all my mother's and relative's recipes and recipe cards and put
    > the pages in vinyl page protectors in 3-ring binders. Somehow I amassed 4
    > 3-inch ring binders of these. Most have never made it to my PC, since it's
    > easy to browse through the binders.
    >
    > When my mother passed away I inherited her cookbooks, recipe collection and
    > a lovely cedar card file box filled with the recipes on cards. I cherished
    > having these. Unfortunately, David accidentally threw out the box along
    > with what he thought was a box of rubbish. I still wish I had the cards
    > and the box for sentimental reasons, but at least I have a "real" image of
    > them.
    >
    > One of these days I would like to enter them all into MasterCook, though,
    > just for ease of searching and use.
    >
    >

    OMG! How painful that must have been--and still be. Yikes!!!!

    --
    Jean B.

  10. #10
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On Fri, 23 May 2008 05:04:31 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> fired up random neurons and synapses
    to opine:

    >When my mother passed away I inherited her cookbooks, recipe collection and
    >a lovely cedar card file box filled with the recipes on cards. I cherished
    >having these. Unfortunately, David accidentally threw out the box along
    >with what he thought was a box of rubbish. I still wish I had the cards
    >and the box for sentimental reasons, but at least I have a "real" image of
    >them.
    >

    Wayne, trust me when I tell you that the only thing you likely missed
    was the smile her handwriting would have brought to your face, which
    is not a small thing. I'm looking at my mother's recipe collections
    (one in a notebook sort of thing and another in a 3 x 5" card index
    box) and 90% of them are really, really bad recipes. These are recipes
    from the 50s that mostly read like the recipes on the packaging of a
    can or a box or a really bad women's magazine. OTOH, they're recipes
    that my mother thought interesting enough to write down and that's
    worth a bunch.
    --

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    "Some weasel took the cork out of my lunch!"

    -- W.C. Fields

  11. #11
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On Fri, 23 May 2008 05:04:31 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> fired up random neurons and synapses
    to opine:

    >When my mother passed away I inherited her cookbooks, recipe collection and
    >a lovely cedar card file box filled with the recipes on cards. I cherished
    >having these. Unfortunately, David accidentally threw out the box along
    >with what he thought was a box of rubbish. I still wish I had the cards
    >and the box for sentimental reasons, but at least I have a "real" image of
    >them.
    >

    Wayne, trust me when I tell you that the only thing you likely missed
    was the smile her handwriting would have brought to your face, which
    is not a small thing. I'm looking at my mother's recipe collections
    (one in a notebook sort of thing and another in a 3 x 5" card index
    box) and 90% of them are really, really bad recipes. These are recipes
    from the 50s that mostly read like the recipes on the packaging of a
    can or a box or a really bad women's magazine. OTOH, they're recipes
    that my mother thought interesting enough to write down and that's
    worth a bunch.
    --

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    "Some weasel took the cork out of my lunch!"

    -- W.C. Fields

  12. #12
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >
    > Wayne, trust me when I tell you that the only thing you likely missed
    > was the smile her handwriting would have brought to your face, which
    > is not a small thing. I'm looking at my mother's recipe collections
    > (one in a notebook sort of thing and another in a 3 x 5" card index
    > box) and 90% of them are really, really bad recipes. These are recipes
    > from the 50s that mostly read like the recipes on the packaging of a
    > can or a box or a really bad women's magazine. OTOH, they're recipes
    > that my mother thought interesting enough to write down and that's
    > worth a bunch.


    But this is the food we ate as kids. And my only sibling
    does not cook, so I deserve ownership of that folder.

    Remind me to pick up mom's manila folder of recipes
    before it's too late. It's a few inches thick of
    recipes clipped out of magazines, beginning in 1948
    when my parents were married.

  13. #13
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >
    > Wayne, trust me when I tell you that the only thing you likely missed
    > was the smile her handwriting would have brought to your face, which
    > is not a small thing. I'm looking at my mother's recipe collections
    > (one in a notebook sort of thing and another in a 3 x 5" card index
    > box) and 90% of them are really, really bad recipes. These are recipes
    > from the 50s that mostly read like the recipes on the packaging of a
    > can or a box or a really bad women's magazine. OTOH, they're recipes
    > that my mother thought interesting enough to write down and that's
    > worth a bunch.


    But this is the food we ate as kids. And my only sibling
    does not cook, so I deserve ownership of that folder.

    Remind me to pick up mom's manila folder of recipes
    before it's too late. It's a few inches thick of
    recipes clipped out of magazines, beginning in 1948
    when my parents were married.

  14. #14
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Wayne, trust me when I tell you that the only thing you likely missed
    > was the smile her handwriting would have brought to your face, which
    > is not a small thing. I'm looking at my mother's recipe collections
    > (one in a notebook sort of thing and another in a 3 x 5" card index
    > box) and 90% of them are really, really bad recipes. These are recipes
    > from the 50s that mostly read like the recipes on the packaging of a
    > can or a box or a really bad women's magazine. OTOH, they're recipes
    > that my mother thought interesting enough to write down and that's
    > worth a bunch.


    I'll support that. All of the boxed and canned stuff doesn't taste the
    same as it did anyway. But I loved it in the fifties.
    Fresh vegetables started with 'boil for a couple of hours'. But my mom
    made some really tasty meals. I've duplicated all of them that I cared
    about except her beef soup. I make very good beef soup, but it's not
    hers. I miss her and hers. I do add a dash of this and a handful of
    that, so I'm learning.

    leo

  15. #15
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Wayne, trust me when I tell you that the only thing you likely missed
    > was the smile her handwriting would have brought to your face, which
    > is not a small thing. I'm looking at my mother's recipe collections
    > (one in a notebook sort of thing and another in a 3 x 5" card index
    > box) and 90% of them are really, really bad recipes. These are recipes
    > from the 50s that mostly read like the recipes on the packaging of a
    > can or a box or a really bad women's magazine. OTOH, they're recipes
    > that my mother thought interesting enough to write down and that's
    > worth a bunch.


    I'll support that. All of the boxed and canned stuff doesn't taste the
    same as it did anyway. But I loved it in the fifties.
    Fresh vegetables started with 'boil for a couple of hours'. But my mom
    made some really tasty meals. I've duplicated all of them that I cared
    about except her beef soup. I make very good beef soup, but it's not
    hers. I miss her and hers. I do add a dash of this and a handful of
    that, so I'm learning.

    leo

  16. #16
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    merryb wrote:
    >
    > I have a lot of my grandma's recipes- it's a little eerie looking at
    > the ones she hand wrote. Among my favorites is her ravioli filling
    > recipe. It's kinda comforing to look thru them, ya know??


    And so what are you going to do? Are you going
    to leave behind any recipes?

    I'm not aware of any good recipes that my mom
    created. I've created a few good ones and
    lots of bad ones. I'm not aware of any recipes
    inherited from previous genrations from my mom,
    though she did some experimental variations
    of the recipes she followed which were
    educational on how to do food. The most I
    learned from my mom about cooking was technique,
    not recipes nor the handling of raw food materials.

    I've got a number of great recipes. I've never
    had fried squid better than what I can make.
    Appealing to a larger audience, I've never had
    better quesadillas than what I can make.

    I've considered the possibility of faking
    a family heritage of great recipes. These
    would be great recipes that I've created, so
    I know they work. Or maybe I just tested
    other recipes of various non-obvious origins,
    all rolled together into a book. And maybe
    a few of my mom's recipes which aren't too bad,
    and slightly altered, if you don't mind
    sliced hot dogs as the meat in a meat salad
    or something like that. Okay, that could be
    some premium meat like a genuine mortadella,

  17. #17
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    merryb wrote:
    >
    > I have a lot of my grandma's recipes- it's a little eerie looking at
    > the ones she hand wrote. Among my favorites is her ravioli filling
    > recipe. It's kinda comforing to look thru them, ya know??


    And so what are you going to do? Are you going
    to leave behind any recipes?

    I'm not aware of any good recipes that my mom
    created. I've created a few good ones and
    lots of bad ones. I'm not aware of any recipes
    inherited from previous genrations from my mom,
    though she did some experimental variations
    of the recipes she followed which were
    educational on how to do food. The most I
    learned from my mom about cooking was technique,
    not recipes nor the handling of raw food materials.

    I've got a number of great recipes. I've never
    had fried squid better than what I can make.
    Appealing to a larger audience, I've never had
    better quesadillas than what I can make.

    I've considered the possibility of faking
    a family heritage of great recipes. These
    would be great recipes that I've created, so
    I know they work. Or maybe I just tested
    other recipes of various non-obvious origins,
    all rolled together into a book. And maybe
    a few of my mom's recipes which aren't too bad,
    and slightly altered, if you don't mind
    sliced hot dogs as the meat in a meat salad
    or something like that. Okay, that could be
    some premium meat like a genuine mortadella,

  18. #18
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On Fri 23 May 2008 03:05:43p, Jean B. told us...

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Thu 22 May 2008 08:01:59p, Terry Pulliam Burd told us...
    >>
    >>> Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    >>> recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* I had mostly (I thought)
    >>> copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    >>> same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    >>> looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    >>> a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    >>> friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    >>> Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    >>> Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    >>> Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."
    >>>
    >>> So, the recipes that "didn't make the cut" from the "Kitchen
    >>> Scrapbook" and her box of 3 x 5" cards to my recipe software
    >>> languished in a cupboard along with their "owners" until I just dug
    >>> 'em out about a half hour ago. If I ever get a chance to actually
    >>> retire (attempt #3 didn't work either - my boss just keeps sweetening
    >>> the deal), I am going to input every last one of those recipes into my
    >>> recipe software in a separate category, and "publish" a book for my
    >>> close kith and kin.
    >>>
    >>> Most of the recipes in my recipe software database have contributors
    >>> such as "Bon Appetit," "Koko@rfc," "LA Times," etc. I still have a
    >>> number that note, "Grandmother Hopkins' Biscuit Recipe," "Great
    >>> Grandmother Marken's Nut Bread," "Auntie Ree's Meatloaf," etc., but it
    >>> doesn't have the same smile-value as seeing these recipes written in
    >>> my mother's handwriting.
    >>>
    >>> And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    >>> in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    >>> scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    >>> my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    >>> which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    >>> retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    >>> fondly remembered relatives.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    >>
    >> I can certainly identify with the feeling. Years before there were
    >> PCs, I photocopied all my mother's and relative's recipes and recipe
    >> cards and put the pages in vinyl page protectors in 3-ring binders.
    >> Somehow I amassed 4 3-inch ring binders of these. Most have never made
    >> it to my PC, since it's easy to browse through the binders.
    >>
    >> When my mother passed away I inherited her cookbooks, recipe collection
    >> and a lovely cedar card file box filled with the recipes on cards. I
    >> cherished having these. Unfortunately, David accidentally threw out
    >> the box along with what he thought was a box of rubbish. I still wish
    >> I had the cards and the box for sentimental reasons, but at least I
    >> have a "real" image of them.
    >>
    >> One of these days I would like to enter them all into MasterCook,
    >> though, just for ease of searching and use.
    >>
    >>

    > OMG! How painful that must have been--and still be. Yikes!!!!
    >


    Yes, it was, and I still think of it. But I couldn't be at all upset with
    David, as it was totally an accident, and he was extremely fond of my
    mother. I think he was almost as upset.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Friday, 05(V)/23(XXIII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    2dys 3hrs 30mins
    -------------------------------------------
    I am, therefore I am (I don't draw
    conclusions).
    -------------------------------------------


  19. #19
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On Fri 23 May 2008 03:05:43p, Jean B. told us...

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Thu 22 May 2008 08:01:59p, Terry Pulliam Burd told us...
    >>
    >>> Another thread had me digging out my late mother's handwritten
    >>> recipes, which I hadn't looked at in *years* I had mostly (I thought)
    >>> copied old family favorites into Mastercook software, later folded
    >>> same into Now You're Cooking! The recipe software is great stuff, but
    >>> looking through my mother's handwritten recipes was something akin to
    >>> a roll call of my family's friends and relatives (mostly *dead*
    >>> friends and relatives): "Jean Alger's Dumplings," "Erma's Devil's Food
    >>> Cake," "Ethel Lata's Pineapple Upside Down Cake," "Leona Meredith's
    >>> Chicken in Pastry Squares,"Anis' Pork Chops and Potatoes," "Clara
    >>> Hinton's Beets," "Alma's Waffles."
    >>>
    >>> So, the recipes that "didn't make the cut" from the "Kitchen
    >>> Scrapbook" and her box of 3 x 5" cards to my recipe software
    >>> languished in a cupboard along with their "owners" until I just dug
    >>> 'em out about a half hour ago. If I ever get a chance to actually
    >>> retire (attempt #3 didn't work either - my boss just keeps sweetening
    >>> the deal), I am going to input every last one of those recipes into my
    >>> recipe software in a separate category, and "publish" a book for my
    >>> close kith and kin.
    >>>
    >>> Most of the recipes in my recipe software database have contributors
    >>> such as "Bon Appetit," "Koko@rfc," "LA Times," etc. I still have a
    >>> number that note, "Grandmother Hopkins' Biscuit Recipe," "Great
    >>> Grandmother Marken's Nut Bread," "Auntie Ree's Meatloaf," etc., but it
    >>> doesn't have the same smile-value as seeing these recipes written in
    >>> my mother's handwriting.
    >>>
    >>> And things were going well, nostalgically speaking, until one recipe
    >>> in the old "Kitchen Scrapbook" leaped out at me: the childhood
    >>> scarring, instantly gag reflexive, monster-in-the-culinary-closet of
    >>> my youth: "Aunt Nina's Green Tuna Casserole." *Now* I know exactly
    >>> which forebear created this abomination of my childhood and can
    >>> retroactively remove my grandmother's twin sister from my list of
    >>> fondly remembered relatives.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>>
    >>> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    >>
    >> I can certainly identify with the feeling. Years before there were
    >> PCs, I photocopied all my mother's and relative's recipes and recipe
    >> cards and put the pages in vinyl page protectors in 3-ring binders.
    >> Somehow I amassed 4 3-inch ring binders of these. Most have never made
    >> it to my PC, since it's easy to browse through the binders.
    >>
    >> When my mother passed away I inherited her cookbooks, recipe collection
    >> and a lovely cedar card file box filled with the recipes on cards. I
    >> cherished having these. Unfortunately, David accidentally threw out
    >> the box along with what he thought was a box of rubbish. I still wish
    >> I had the cards and the box for sentimental reasons, but at least I
    >> have a "real" image of them.
    >>
    >> One of these days I would like to enter them all into MasterCook,
    >> though, just for ease of searching and use.
    >>
    >>

    > OMG! How painful that must have been--and still be. Yikes!!!!
    >


    Yes, it was, and I still think of it. But I couldn't be at all upset with
    David, as it was totally an accident, and he was extremely fond of my
    mother. I think he was almost as upset.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Friday, 05(V)/23(XXIII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    2dys 3hrs 30mins
    -------------------------------------------
    I am, therefore I am (I don't draw
    conclusions).
    -------------------------------------------


  20. #20
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Family Recipe Collections and Nostalgia

    On Fri 23 May 2008 07:07:27p, Terry Pulliam Burd told us...

    > On Fri, 23 May 2008 05:04:31 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    > <wayneboatwright@arizona.usa.com> fired up random neurons and synapses
    > to opine:
    >
    >>When my mother passed away I inherited her cookbooks, recipe collection
    >>and a lovely cedar card file box filled with the recipes on cards. I
    >>cherished having these. Unfortunately, David accidentally threw out the
    >>box along with what he thought was a box of rubbish. I still wish I had
    >>the cards and the box for sentimental reasons, but at least I have a
    >>"real" image of them.
    >>

    > Wayne, trust me when I tell you that the only thing you likely missed
    > was the smile her handwriting would have brought to your face, which
    > is not a small thing. I'm looking at my mother's recipe collections
    > (one in a notebook sort of thing and another in a 3 x 5" card index
    > box) and 90% of them are really, really bad recipes. These are recipes
    > from the 50s that mostly read like the recipes on the packaging of a
    > can or a box or a really bad women's magazine. OTOH, they're recipes
    > that my mother thought interesting enough to write down and that's
    > worth a bunch.
    > --
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    Actually, Terry, my mother's (and her family's) recipe were really quite
    good for the most part. They rare kept magazine snippets and the like. A
    fair number of my grandmother's recipes won her blue ribbons at county and
    state fairs.

    I'm just very glad that years before this happened I had photocopied them.
    Especially, too, because even though they're copies, I can still smile
    nostalgically when I read them, the handwriting is still there.


    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Friday, 05(V)/23(XXIII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    2dys 3hrs 30mins
    -------------------------------------------
    I am, therefore I am (I don't draw
    conclusions).
    -------------------------------------------


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