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Thread: From failure to success

  1. #1
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default From failure to success

    Ok, so a couple months ago I had a dough failure, the yeast died. I froze
    the dough thinking some day I would figure out what to do with it since I
    made 2 whole pounds. So I defrosted it the other day and made little
    "pancakes" out of about 3 ounce balls of dough. I rolled them out to 1/4
    inch and then fried them in melted butter in a hot iron skillet. Couple
    minutes per side and OMG the bread was divine. The texture was firm, chewy,
    buttery and an aroma of mild yeast. The crust was crispy and tangy and he
    inside was chewy and soft making a really nice texture combination. Very
    tasty. I can't eat much of it but my experience can make the world a finer
    place. It's unleavened bread but has a slight yeasty taste which is quite
    nice. And the frying makes the texture soft and moist. It would make a
    great cocktail sandwich bread.

    Paul



  2. #2
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success

    On Fri, 9 Mar 2012 22:51:43 -0800, Paul M. Cook wrote:

    > Ok, so a couple months ago I had a dough failure, the yeast died. I froze
    > the dough thinking some day I would figure out what to do with it since I
    > made 2 whole pounds. So I defrosted it the other day and made little
    > "pancakes" out of about 3 ounce balls of dough. I rolled them out to 1/4
    > inch and then fried them in melted butter in a hot iron skillet. Couple
    > minutes per side and OMG the bread was divine. The texture was firm, chewy,
    > buttery and an aroma of mild yeast. The crust was crispy and tangy and he
    > inside was chewy and soft making a really nice texture combination. Very
    > tasty. I can't eat much of it but my experience can make the world a finer
    > place. It's unleavened bread but has a slight yeasty taste which is quite
    > nice. And the frying makes the texture soft and moist. It would make a
    > great cocktail sandwich bread.


    I did something very similar with my "no-knead bread" dough. I forgot
    about it in the unlit oven for 72+ hours. Rolled and patted it and
    fried it in a little EVOO. It was interesting, but I still threw the
    rest of it away.

    It would have had potential if I rolled it thinner. These were not
    unlike unleavened crumpets, but not very light.

    -sw

  3. #3
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success

    On Fri, 9 Mar 2012 22:51:43 -0800, "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > It would make a
    >great cocktail sandwich bread.
    >
    >Paul


    Like for a canape?

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success


    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 9 Mar 2012 22:51:43 -0800, "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> It would make a
    >>great cocktail sandwich bread.
    >>
    >>Paul

    >
    > Like for a canape?


    Sure. I can see these split in two and filled with all kinds of things.
    The taste was a very mild sourdough and the texture was just so pleasing.
    The thing is the dead yeast adds so much. I can see sliced cold beef and
    mustard, shrimp, chicken salad, salami and cheese, cucumbers and butter,
    heck even peanut butter and jelly.

    Paul



  5. #5
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 9 Mar 2012 22:51:43 -0800, Paul M. Cook wrote:
    >
    >> Ok, so a couple months ago I had a dough failure, the yeast died. I
    >> froze
    >> the dough thinking some day I would figure out what to do with it since I
    >> made 2 whole pounds. So I defrosted it the other day and made little
    >> "pancakes" out of about 3 ounce balls of dough. I rolled them out to 1/4
    >> inch and then fried them in melted butter in a hot iron skillet. Couple
    >> minutes per side and OMG the bread was divine. The texture was firm,
    >> chewy,
    >> buttery and an aroma of mild yeast. The crust was crispy and tangy and he
    >> inside was chewy and soft making a really nice texture combination. Very
    >> tasty. I can't eat much of it but my experience can make the world a
    >> finer
    >> place. It's unleavened bread but has a slight yeasty taste which is
    >> quite
    >> nice. And the frying makes the texture soft and moist. It would make a
    >> great cocktail sandwich bread.

    >
    > I did something very similar with my "no-knead bread" dough. I forgot
    > about it in the unlit oven for 72+ hours. Rolled and patted it and
    > fried it in a little EVOO. It was interesting, but I still threw the
    > rest of it away.
    >


    I would think after that much time the alcohol and acetic acid would not be
    pleasant in the bread. I am thinking this bread I made benefited from 5
    days in the fridge before being frozen. The texture before freezing was
    smooth and velvety with a refined texture.

    > It would have had potential if I rolled it thinner. These were not
    > unlike unleavened crumpets, but not very light.
    >


    Yes, crumpets. They do have a similar aroma and texture.

    Paul



  6. #6
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success

    On 3/10/2012 1:51 AM, Paul M. Cook wrote:
    > Ok, so a couple months ago I had a dough failure, the yeast died. I froze
    > the dough thinking some day I would figure out what to do with it since I
    > made 2 whole pounds. So I defrosted it the other day and made little
    > "pancakes" out of about 3 ounce balls of dough. I rolled them out to 1/4
    > inch and then fried them in melted butter in a hot iron skillet. Couple
    > minutes per side and OMG the bread was divine. The texture was firm, chewy,
    > buttery and an aroma of mild yeast. The crust was crispy and tangy and he
    > inside was chewy and soft making a really nice texture combination. Very
    > tasty. I can't eat much of it but my experience can make the world a finer
    > place. It's unleavened bread but has a slight yeasty taste which is quite
    > nice. And the frying makes the texture soft and moist. It would make a
    > great cocktail sandwich bread.


    I bet the dough would make great sopaipillas (or something like them).

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.
    ŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻ ŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻŻ

  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success

    On Sat, 10 Mar 2012 02:10:41 -0800, Paul M. Cook wrote:

    > "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >> I did something very similar with my "no-knead bread" dough. I forgot
    >> about it in the unlit oven for 72+ hours. Rolled and patted it and
    >> fried it in a little EVOO. It was interesting, but I still threw the
    >> rest of it away.

    >
    > I would think after that much time the alcohol and acetic acid would not be
    > pleasant in the bread.


    There a definite alcohol odor to it before I cooked it up, but no acid
    taste at all. I wondered what I could do with it, but in the end I
    figured it was about $.50 worth of ingredients, so screw it.

    -sw

  8. #8
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success


    "Jerry Avins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    newsgM6r.35668$[email protected]..
    > On 3/10/2012 1:51 AM, Paul M. Cook wrote:
    >> Ok, so a couple months ago I had a dough failure, the yeast died. I
    >> froze
    >> the dough thinking some day I would figure out what to do with it since I
    >> made 2 whole pounds. So I defrosted it the other day and made little
    >> "pancakes" out of about 3 ounce balls of dough. I rolled them out to 1/4
    >> inch and then fried them in melted butter in a hot iron skillet. Couple
    >> minutes per side and OMG the bread was divine. The texture was firm,
    >> chewy,
    >> buttery and an aroma of mild yeast. The crust was crispy and tangy and he
    >> inside was chewy and soft making a really nice texture combination. Very
    >> tasty. I can't eat much of it but my experience can make the world a
    >> finer
    >> place. It's unleavened bread but has a slight yeasty taste which is
    >> quite
    >> nice. And the frying makes the texture soft and moist. It would make a
    >> great cocktail sandwich bread.

    >
    > I bet the dough would make great sopaipillas (or something like them).


    Yeah, I was thinking that. I imagine refried beans, roasted shredded beef
    with chiles and onions, some salsa, little cotija. Would be great.

    Paul



  9. #9
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success

    Paul M. Cook wrote:

    >> I bet the dough would make great sopaipillas (or something like them).

    >
    >Yeah, I was thinking that. I imagine refried beans, roasted shredded beef
    >with chiles and onions, some salsa, little cotija. Would be great.


    Sounds ok, but there's no such thing as "refried" beans. That's an
    erroneous translation of "frijoles refritos". It bugs me when I see it
    in a newspaper article.



  10. #10
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success

    On Mar 10, 1:51*am, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > Ok, so a couple months ago I had a dough failure, the yeast died. *I froze
    > the dough thinking some day I would figure out what to do with it since I
    > made 2 whole pounds. *So I defrosted it the other day and made little
    > "pancakes" out of about 3 ounce balls of dough. *I rolled them out to 1/4
    > inch and then fried them in melted butter in a hot iron skillet. *Couple
    > minutes per side and OMG the bread was divine. *The texture was firm, chewy,
    > buttery and an aroma of mild yeast. The crust was crispy and tangy and he
    > inside was chewy and soft making a really nice texture combination. Very
    > tasty. *I can't eat much of it but my experience can make the world a finer
    > place. *It's unleavened bread but has a slight yeasty taste which is quite
    > nice. *And the frying makes the texture soft and moist. *It would make a
    > great cocktail sandwich bread.
    >
    > Paul


    My frugal bone admires your waste-not attitude. Glad they were tasty.

  11. #11
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success


    "George M. Middius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Paul M. Cook wrote:
    >
    >>> I bet the dough would make great sopaipillas (or something like them).

    >>
    >>Yeah, I was thinking that. I imagine refried beans, roasted shredded beef
    >>with chiles and onions, some salsa, little cotija. Would be great.

    >
    > Sounds ok, but there's no such thing as "refried" beans. That's an
    > erroneous translation of "frijoles refritos". It bugs me when I see it
    > in a newspaper article.


    Yeah, bad enough they fry beans but then they do it AGAIN!

    Paul



  12. #12
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success

    On Saturday, March 10, 2012 4:06:56 PM UTC-6, George M. Middius wrote:
    > Paul M. Cook wrote:
    >
    > >> I bet the dough would make great sopaipillas (or something like them).

    > >
    > >Yeah, I was thinking that. I imagine refried beans, roasted shredded beef
    > >with chiles and onions, some salsa, little cotija. Would be great.

    >
    > Sounds ok, but there's no such thing as "refried" beans. That's an
    > erroneous translation of "frijoles refritos". It bugs me when I see it
    > in a newspaper article.


    The appropriate translation is "well-fried beans." I fry mine in refined coconut oil these days.

    --Bryan


  13. #13
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success

    Paul M. Cook wrote:

    >>>Yeah, I was thinking that. I imagine refried beans, roasted shredded beef
    >>>with chiles and onions, some salsa, little cotija. Would be great.

    >>
    >> Sounds ok, but there's no such thing as "refried" beans. That's an
    >> erroneous translation of "frijoles refritos". It bugs me when I see it
    >> in a newspaper article.

    >
    >Yeah, bad enough they fry beans but then they do it AGAIN!


    I'll bet that "joke" made you spurt your milk through your nose.



  14. #14
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success


    "George M. Middius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:m4vnl71ip9lsrdvrt7vrr5d7mapa83e[email protected]..
    > Paul M. Cook wrote:
    >
    >>>>Yeah, I was thinking that. I imagine refried beans, roasted shredded
    >>>>beef
    >>>>with chiles and onions, some salsa, little cotija. Would be great.
    >>>
    >>> Sounds ok, but there's no such thing as "refried" beans. That's an
    >>> erroneous translation of "frijoles refritos". It bugs me when I see it
    >>> in a newspaper article.

    >>
    >>Yeah, bad enough they fry beans but then they do it AGAIN!

    >
    > I'll bet that "joke" made you spurt your milk through your nose.


    Joke?

    Paul



  15. #15
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: From failure to success


    "Bryan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:5059573.509.1331426235303.JavaMail.geo-discussion-forums@ynll40...
    > On Saturday, March 10, 2012 4:06:56 PM UTC-6, George M. Middius wrote:
    >> Paul M. Cook wrote:
    >>
    >> >> I bet the dough would make great sopaipillas (or something like them).
    >> >
    >> >Yeah, I was thinking that. I imagine refried beans, roasted shredded
    >> >beef
    >> >with chiles and onions, some salsa, little cotija. Would be great.

    >>
    >> Sounds ok, but there's no such thing as "refried" beans. That's an
    >> erroneous translation of "frijoles refritos". It bugs me when I see it
    >> in a newspaper article.

    >
    > The appropriate translation is "well-fried beans." I fry mine in refined
    > coconut oil these days.


    Lard here.

    Paul



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