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Thread: Eye of round

  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Eye of round

    Hi. I'm seeing eye of round roasts at $2.99 per pound. That's
    a good deal here. So I wish to buy maybe a two pound chunk.
    I like it's flavour and leaness. There are parts of the eye
    that make a decent (somewhat chewy though) steak. Some parts
    of the eye make a horrible steak; completely tough. So my
    question is: what part of the eye is most tender? Cuts toward
    the tapered end, or towards the other end?


  2. #2
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    On Sat, 29 May 2010 04:41:00 +0200 (CEST), Anonymous wrote:

    > Hi. I'm seeing eye of round roasts at $2.99 per pound. That's
    > a good deal here. So I wish to buy maybe a two pound chunk.
    > I like it's flavour and leaness. There are parts of the eye
    > that make a decent (somewhat chewy though) steak. Some parts
    > of the eye make a horrible steak; completely tough. So my
    > question is: what part of the eye is most tender? Cuts toward
    > the tapered end, or towards the other end?


    It's all a single muscle. It should have the same consistency
    throughout.

    But the tapered end will overcook easily, possibly giving it the
    impression that's it's tougher.

    I haven't bought an eye of round roast since I was 19 years old.
    It was probably the biggest piece of meat I'd ever bought at the
    time. Cooked it up just fine, but there was this big, honking
    1.5" round tumor about one" into the slicing of the roast.

    Threw it out and never looked at another eye since.

    -sw

  3. #3
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    > I haven't bought an eye of round roast since I was 19 years old.
    > It was probably the biggest piece of meat I'd ever bought at the
    > time. Cooked it up just fine, but there was this big, honking
    > 1.5" round tumor about one" into the slicing of the roast.
    >
    > Threw it out and never looked at another eye since.
    >


    Ewwwww


  4. #4
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Anonymous <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi. I'm seeing eye of round roasts at $2.99 per pound. That's
    > a good deal here. So I wish to buy maybe a two pound chunk.
    > I like it's flavour and leaness. There are parts of the eye
    > that make a decent (somewhat chewy though) steak. Some parts
    > of the eye make a horrible steak; completely tough. So my
    > question is: what part of the eye is most tender? Cuts toward
    > the tapered end, or towards the other end?


    If it is the the same 'eye of round' that we get around here, cut 3/8"
    slabs across the grain, pound to half the original thickness or less
    with a tenderizing hammer and make chicken/country fried steak.
    When I was young, my teeth would slice through 'eye of round'. Not so
    much anymore.
    Or [never tried], pound the above and marinate in a half cup of water
    and a half cup of soy sauce with four medium to large cloves of garlic
    crushed into the marinade for a couple of hours. Then quick fry. I
    usually use unpounded 1/4" sliced top sirloin for that, but I bet it'll
    work.

    leo

  5. #5
    A Moose In Love Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    On May 29, 12:19*am, Leonard Blaisdell <leoblaisd...@sbcglobal.net>
    wrote:
    > In article <20100529024100.A88531A7...@www.ecn.org>,
    >
    > *Anonymous <cri...@ecn.org> wrote:
    > > Hi. *I'm seeing eye of round roasts at $2.99 per pound. *That's
    > > a good deal here. *So I wish to buy maybe a two pound chunk.
    > > I like it's flavour and leaness. *There are parts of the eye
    > > that make a decent (somewhat chewy though) steak. *Some parts
    > > of the eye make a horrible steak; completely tough. *So my
    > > question is: *what part of the eye is most tender? *Cuts toward
    > > the tapered end, or towards the other end?

    >
    > If it is the the same 'eye of round' that we get around here, cut 3/8"
    > slabs across the grain, pound to half the original thickness or less
    > with a tenderizing hammer and make chicken/country fried steak.
    > When I was young, my teeth would slice through 'eye of round'. Not so
    > much anymore.
    > Or [never tried], pound the above and marinate in a half cup of water
    > and a half cup of soy sauce with four medium to large cloves of garlic
    > crushed into the marinade for a couple of hours. Then quick fry. I
    > usually use unpounded 1/4" sliced top sirloin for that, but I bet it'll
    > work.
    >
    > leo


    I've had the same experience as the OP. I've bought eye of round
    steaks before and some were tender enough for dry cooking and others
    were way tough. This leads me to believe that certain parts of the
    muscle are used more than other parts. Certain parts of the eye are
    more tender than other parts.

  6. #6
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    On Sat, 29 May 2010 04:41:00 +0200 (CEST), Anonymous <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Hi. I'm seeing eye of round roasts at $2.99 per pound. That's
    >a good deal here. So I wish to buy maybe a two pound chunk.
    >I like it's flavour and leaness. There are parts of the eye
    >that make a decent (somewhat chewy though) steak. Some parts
    >of the eye make a horrible steak; completely tough. So my
    >question is: what part of the eye is most tender? Cuts toward
    >the tapered end, or towards the other end?


    No part of this cut is tender... eye round can be sliced into steaks
    and mechanically tenderized but doesn't contain any marbling to be
    useful as steak regardless the tenderizing method; marinade, pounding,
    cubing. I suggest oven roasting, at least half an eye round (the
    thick end cooks up a bit moister but really not so you'd notice),
    roast with low heat (325F) no more than 20-25 minutes per pound (best
    to use a meat thermometer), be sure to remove the silverskin... if you
    don't like rare beef this cut is not for you. Sliced cold, paper
    thin, eye round makes excellent sandwiches.

  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    In article <[email protected]>,
    brooklyn1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 29 May 2010 04:41:00 +0200 (CEST), Anonymous <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Hi. I'm seeing eye of round roasts at $2.99 per pound. That's
    > >a good deal here. So I wish to buy maybe a two pound chunk.
    > >I like it's flavour and leaness. There are parts of the eye
    > >that make a decent (somewhat chewy though) steak. Some parts
    > >of the eye make a horrible steak; completely tough. So my
    > >question is: what part of the eye is most tender? Cuts toward
    > >the tapered end, or towards the other end?

    >
    > No part of this cut is tender... eye round can be sliced into steaks
    > and mechanically tenderized but doesn't contain any marbling to be
    > useful as steak regardless the tenderizing method; marinade, pounding,
    > cubing. I suggest oven roasting, at least half an eye round (the
    > thick end cooks up a bit moister but really not so you'd notice),
    > roast with low heat (325F) no more than 20-25 minutes per pound (best
    > to use a meat thermometer), be sure to remove the silverskin... if you
    > don't like rare beef this cut is not for you. Sliced cold, paper
    > thin, eye round makes excellent sandwiches.


    My favorite way to serve it is Tartare. Cooking makes it tough.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  8. #8
    Lew Hodgett Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    Anonymous wrote:

    >> Hi. I'm seeing eye of round roasts at $2.99 per pound. That's
    >> a good deal here. So I wish to buy maybe a two pound chunk.
    >> I like it's flavour and leaness. There are parts of the eye
    >> that make a decent (somewhat chewy though) steak. Some parts
    >> of the eye make a horrible steak; completely tough. So my
    >> question is: what part of the eye is most tender? Cuts toward
    >> the tapered end, or towards the other end?

    ------------------------------------------
    It's a roast, treat it as such.
    -----------------------------------------

    "Leonard Blaisdell" wrote:
    >
    > If it is the the same 'eye of round' that we get around here, cut
    > 3/8"
    > slabs across the grain, pound to half the original thickness or less
    > with a tenderizing hammer and make chicken/country fried steak.

    ------------------------------------
    Start with the 3/8" cross cut slabs as above, then cross cut slabs
    into 3/8x3/8 logs which you then marinate in L&P Worcestershire sauce.

    Drain and use for stir fries or sear over high heat in a cast iron
    skillet to brown working in batches removing to a paper towel covered
    plate.

    Brown some chopped onions in drippings, add some chopped garlic and
    some flour to make a dark roux.

    Add milk to make a gravy, whisking constantly, return meat to pot and
    cook 10-15 minutes.

    Let rest 5-10 minutes, then serve over rice or hash browned potatoes.

    Enjoy

    Lew







  9. #9
    Zz Yzx Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    Jerky.

    -Zz

  10. #10
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    On May 29, 9:40*am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In article <k672065a4nmn7lj0re1vdo10c8dcf3f...@4ax.com>,
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > *brooklyn1 <gravesen...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > > On Sat, 29 May 2010 04:41:00 +0200 (CEST), Anonymous <cri...@ecn.org>
    > > wrote:

    >
    > > >Hi. *I'm seeing eye of round roasts at $2.99 per pound. *That's
    > > >a good deal here. *So I wish to buy maybe a two pound chunk.
    > > >I like it's flavour and leaness. *There are parts of the eye
    > > >that make a decent (somewhat chewy though) steak. *Some parts
    > > >of the eye make a horrible steak; completely tough. *So my
    > > >question is: *what part of the eye is most tender? *Cuts toward
    > > >the tapered end, or towards the other end?

    >
    > > No part of this cut is tender... eye round can be sliced into steaks
    > > and mechanically tenderized but doesn't contain any marbling to be
    > > useful as steak regardless the tenderizing method; marinade, pounding,
    > > cubing. *I suggest oven roasting, at least half an eye round (the
    > > thick end cooks up a bit moister but really not so you'd notice),
    > > roast with low heat (325F) no more than 20-25 minutes per pound (best
    > > to use a meat thermometer), be sure to remove the silverskin... if you
    > > don't like rare beef this cut is not for you. *Sliced cold, paper
    > > thin, eye round makes excellent sandwiches.

    >
    > My favorite way to serve it is Tartare. *Cooking makes it tough.
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    It's tough anyway - no marbling, no fat. I haven't bought one in
    decades, as I think it's just a waste of money.

    N.

  11. #11
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Anonymous <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi. I'm seeing eye of round roasts at $2.99 per pound. That's
    > a good deal here. So I wish to buy maybe a two pound chunk.
    > I like it's flavour and leaness. There are parts of the eye
    > that make a decent (somewhat chewy though) steak. Some parts
    > of the eye make a horrible steak; completely tough. So my
    > question is: what part of the eye is most tender? Cuts toward
    > the tapered end, or towards the other end?


    Eye of round roasts belong in display in the meat section of your
    market, to sit there until they reach the pull date, at which point the
    butcher can grind them into hamburger to increase the leanness. Don't
    buy them, unless they are really cheap. They are very pretty, and
    perhaps many of us have succumbed to the temptation and bought them,
    only to find that they are tough as shoe leather when roasted. Cooking
    them only until rare and then slicing paper thin will help, but just
    about any other cut of round steak will be more tender.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  12. #12
    A Moose In Love Guest

    Default Re: Eye of round

    On Jun 1, 3:23*pm, Dan Abel <da...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > In article <20100529024100.A88531A7...@www.ecn.org>,
    >
    > *Anonymous <cri...@ecn.org> wrote:
    > > Hi. *I'm seeing eye of round roasts at $2.99 per pound. *That's
    > > a good deal here. *So I wish to buy maybe a two pound chunk.
    > > I like it's flavour and leaness. *There are parts of the eye
    > > that make a decent (somewhat chewy though) steak. *Some parts
    > > of the eye make a horrible steak; completely tough. *So my
    > > question is: *what part of the eye is most tender? *Cuts toward
    > > the tapered end, or towards the other end?

    >
    > Eye of round roasts belong in display in the meat section of your
    > market, to sit there until they reach the pull date, at which point the
    > butcher can grind them into hamburger to increase the leanness. *Don't
    > buy them, unless they are really cheap. *They are very pretty, and
    > perhaps many of us have succumbed to the temptation and bought them,
    > only to find that they are tough as shoe leather when roasted. *Cooking
    > them only until rare and then slicing paper thin will help, but just
    > about any other cut of round steak will be more tender.
    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel
    > Petaluma, California USA
    > da...@sonic.net


    If I can get them fairly cheap, I'll use them for a stroganoff. True,
    the meat has hardly any marbling resulting in a stew where the meat is
    a tad dry, but personally I don't mind. I find the flavour
    acceptable. They make an excellent roast when wrapped in bacon(put
    some liquid in the roasting pan after browing). They also make an
    excellent pot roast. They basically lend themselves to moist heat
    cookery. There are portions of the eye that you can use for a half
    decent steak (with some chew). Where those portions are exactly, I
    don't know. Our butchers here in town tend to sell the more tender
    parts of the eye of round as a pepper steak. Really a peppercorn
    steak. Sometimes they are horribly tough, and sometimes they are just
    a tad chewy.

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