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Thread: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    Hi,

    I recently bought an enamel-on-steel kettle to boil water (it is
    covered with black enamel on the inside). After i used it several
    times, i was cleaning the inside with a paper towel and i saw a lot of
    dark residue left on the paper towel. Is it normal? It seems like
    after i cleaned it the traces of that stuff disappeared but after i
    boiled the water again they reappeared. Should i be concerned that
    the enamel is dissolving into the water? or is it just something from
    the water itself?

    Thanks
    Yev

  2. #2
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently bought an enamel-on-steel kettle to boil water (it is
    > covered with black enamel on the inside). After i used it several
    > times, i was cleaning the inside with a paper towel and i saw a lot of
    > dark residue left on the paper towel. Is it normal? It seems like
    > after i cleaned it the traces of that stuff disappeared but after i
    > boiled the water again they reappeared. Should i be concerned that
    > the enamel is dissolving into the water? or is it just something from
    > the water itself?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Yev


    You didn't mention the manufacturer's location. If the kettle was
    manufactured in China, then perhaps you might want to have it test for
    its lead content? Just an idea, otherwise I have no clue.

    Sky

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice

  3. #3
    Dominic T. Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    On Mar 23, 12:02 am, yev...@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently bought an enamel-on-steel kettle to boil water (it is
    > covered with black enamel on the inside). After i used it several
    > times, i was cleaning the inside with a paper towel and i saw a lot of
    > dark residue left on the paper towel. Is it normal? It seems like
    > after i cleaned it the traces of that stuff disappeared but after i
    > boiled the water again they reappeared. Should i be concerned that
    > the enamel is dissolving into the water? or is it just something from
    > the water itself?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Yev


    Oof, well I'd imagine it to be either from the kettle or your water.
    I'm hoping it is the kettle though because if your water is that bad
    you got bigger fish to fry. Wipe it out real well and try boiling some
    bottled or distilled water in it and see what happens. If you still
    get black then you know it is the kettle (which I'm guessing it is).

    You may want to retire it to a decorative kettle and get something
    different.

    - Dominic

  4. #4
    Rina Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    I think the residue is just minerals in your water. I get the same thing in
    my stainless steel tea kettle.

    Rina


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently bought an enamel-on-steel kettle to boil water (it is
    > covered with black enamel on the inside). After i used it several
    > times, i was cleaning the inside with a paper towel and i saw a lot of
    > dark residue left on the paper towel. Is it normal? It seems like
    > after i cleaned it the traces of that stuff disappeared but after i
    > boiled the water again they reappeared. Should i be concerned that
    > the enamel is dissolving into the water? or is it just something from
    > the water itself?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Yev




  5. #5
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    Rina wrote:
    > I think the residue is just minerals in your water. I get the same thing in
    > my stainless steel tea kettle.
    >
    > Rina
    >
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I recently bought an enamel-on-steel kettle to boil water (it is
    >> covered with black enamel on the inside). After i used it several
    >> times, i was cleaning the inside with a paper towel and i saw a lot of
    >> dark residue left on the paper towel. Is it normal? It seems like
    >> after i cleaned it the traces of that stuff disappeared but after i
    >> boiled the water again they reappeared. Should i be concerned that
    >> the enamel is dissolving into the water? or is it just something from
    >> the water itself?
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> Yev

    >
    >

    Add a couple of tablespoons of 5% white vinegar to the pot when you fill
    it with water. Will keep the stuff from precipitating out on your pot.

    George

  6. #6
    S Viemeister Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    George Shirley wrote:

    >>

    > Add a couple of tablespoons of 5% white vinegar to the pot when you fill
    > it with water. Will keep the stuff from precipitating out on your pot.
    >


    Won't that adversely affect the flavour of your tea?

  7. #7
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    On Mar 24, 4:47*pm, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    > Rina wrote:
    > > I think the residue is just minerals in your water. I get the same thingin
    > > my stainless steel tea kettle.

    >
    > > Rina

    >
    > > <yev...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >> Hi,

    >
    > >> I recently bought anenamel-on-steelkettle to boil water (it is
    > >> covered with black enamel on the inside). *After i used it several
    > >> times, i was cleaning the inside with a paper towel and i saw a lot of
    > >> dark residue left on the paper towel. *Is it normal? *It seems like
    > >> after i cleaned it the traces of that stuff disappeared but after i
    > >> boiled the water again they reappeared. * Should i be concerned that
    > >> the enamel is dissolving into the water? or is it just something from
    > >> the water itself?

    >
    > >> Thanks
    > >> Yev

    >
    > Add a couple of tablespoons of 5% white vinegar to the pot when you fill
    > it with water. Will keep the stuff from precipitating out on your pot.
    >
    > George- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Hi all,

    Thanks for the responses. I kinda doubt it could be from the water,
    because i have other pots (not sure if they are stainless steel or
    aluminum) and i dont get any of that residue there when i boil the
    water. But i ll try to boil bottled water and see what happens.



  8. #8
    Someone who cares Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    On Mar 23, 12:02*am, yev...@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I recently bought an enamel-on-steel kettle to boil water (it is
    > covered with black enamel on the inside). *After i used it several
    > times, i was cleaning the inside with a paper towel and i saw a lot of
    > dark residue left on the paper towel. *Is it normal? *It seems like
    > after i cleaned it the traces of that stuff disappeared but after i
    > boiled the water again they reappeared. * Should i be concerned that
    > the enamel is dissolving into the water? or is it just something from
    > the water itself?
    >
    > Thanks
    > Yev


    health concern about using glassware or enamelware comes from
    components used in making, glazing, or decorating them, such as
    pigments, lead, or cadmium. These materials are harmful when taken
    into the body, so the risk of them entering food is controlled during
    the manufacturing process.

    In Canada, glazed ceramics and glassware are regulated and cookware
    made of these materials can not be sold, advertised or imported if it
    releases more than trace amounts of lead and cadmium. Products having
    greater than the allowable levels of lead and cadmium must be
    identified by a label indicating the presence of lead and/or cadmium,
    or by a design feature such as a hole or a mounting hook, indicating
    that they should not be used for food.




  9. #9
    Kenneth Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 18:48:29 -0700 (PDT), [email protected]
    wrote:

    >Hi all,
    >
    >Thanks for the responses. I kinda doubt it could be from the water,
    >because i have other pots (not sure if they are stainless steel or
    >aluminum) and i dont get any of that residue there when i boil the
    >water. But i ll try to boil bottled water and see what happens.
    >


    Howdy,

    Distilled water may be what you want for your test, but
    ordinary "bottled water" may well be higher in mineral
    content than your tap water.

    All the best,
    --
    Kenneth

    If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."

  10. #10
    Rina Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    You probably clean other pans immediately, or if using them for water, other
    things go into that water, such as pasta or potatoes, you wouldn't notice
    the residue.

    Tea kettles seem to get water added and boiled several times before
    thoroughly cleaning again. (In my kitchen at least, or am I just a slob
    ,<laughing>) I do begin each morning with a freshly cleaned tea kettle.

    That's one thing that annoys me about many tea kettles, the top opening is
    too small to get your hand in and scrub the kettle...

    Rina


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Mar 24, 4:47 pm, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    > Rina wrote:
    > > I think the residue is just minerals in your water. I get the same thing
    > > in
    > > my stainless steel tea kettle.

    -

    Hi all,

    Thanks for the responses. I kinda doubt it could be from the water,
    because i have other pots (not sure if they are stainless steel or
    aluminum) and i dont get any of that residue there when i boil the
    water. But i ll try to boil bottled water and see what happens.




  11. #11
    John Kane Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    Rina wrote:
    > Tea kettles seem to get water added and boiled several times before
    > thoroughly cleaning again. (In my kitchen at least, or am I just a slob
    > ,<laughing>) I do begin each morning with a freshly cleaned tea kettle.


    You WASH the tea kettle? I remove the lime buildup once in a while but
    WASH???
    >
    > That's one thing that annoys me about many tea kettles, the top opening is
    > too small to get your hand in and scrub the kettle...


    Hence proving I was right not to try washing the blasted thing. Clearly
    too dangerous since if you get your hand in you may need a cutting
    torch to get it out.

    --
    John Kane, Kingston ON Canada

  12. #12
    Rina Guest

    Default Re: are enamel-on-steel kettles safe?

    Yes, I Wash my stainless steel tea kettle... as I do the rest of my pots &
    pans. The lid comes off and I can put my whole hand in and swish a dish
    cloth or sponge around and remove the previous days residue.

    We have well water from a deep artesian well, its high in mineral content.
    Left in the kettle, the kettle gets gritty.


    Rina


    "John Kane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:fsbl19$2dt$[email protected]..

    >
    > You WASH the tea kettle? I remove the lime buildup once in a while but
    > WASH???
    >>
    >> That's one thing that annoys me about many tea kettles, the top opening
    >> is too small to get your hand in and scrub the kettle...

    >
    > Hence proving I was right not to try washing the blasted thing. Clearly
    > too dangerous since if you get your hand in you may need a cutting torch
    > to get it out.




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