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Thread: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

  1. #1
    modom (palindrome guy) Guest

    Default en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    If a goat may offer a point on the topic: a brochette is a skewer in
    French. A dish cooked on a skewer is cooked "en brochette." While it
    is two words in the original and not one, it is not a fabrication made
    of whole cloth to name a dish of proteins grilled on skewers "X
    enbrochette." Such language mutations are most common in Cajun and
    creole constructions. That the restaurant in question calls itself
    Atchafalaya even though it's in Houston would locate its cuisine
    outside standard French usage but squarely inside rural Acadiana.

    While there is certainly not any single recipe for "X en brochette" or
    even "X enbrochette," I'd assume the cooks at Atchafalaya in Houston
    do follow something like a consistent method and ingredient list when
    they prepare their evidently tasty dish.

    More about the Atchafalaya can be found here:
    http://www.newyorker.com/archive/198...ARDS_000347146

    I mean the river in Louisiana, not the restaurant in Houston. John
    McPhee is a great writer, and the subject is his equal in that piece.
    Having seen at an early age the rivers and bayous he mentions in the
    essay, I may have more of a sense of connectedness than many to the
    story. I've fished in Old River, and most RFCers haven't. But I think
    I can say that McPhee's story is wonderful, anyway.
    --

    modom

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    On Fri, 21 Aug 2009 23:27:01 -0500, "modom (palindrome guy)"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >If a goat may offer a point on the topic: a brochette is a skewer in
    >French. A dish cooked on a skewer is cooked "en brochette." While it
    >is two words in the original and not one, it is not a fabrication made
    >of whole cloth to name a dish of proteins grilled on skewers "X
    >enbrochette." Such language mutations are most common in Cajun and
    >creole constructions. That the restaurant in question calls itself
    >Atchafalaya even though it's in Houston would locate its cuisine
    >outside standard French usage but squarely inside rural Acadiana.
    >
    >While there is certainly not any single recipe for "X en brochette" or
    >even "X enbrochette," I'd assume the cooks at Atchafalaya in Houston
    >do follow something like a consistent method and ingredient list when
    >they prepare their evidently tasty dish.


    Thanks, Michael. You're the soothing voice of reason.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  3. #3
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    modom (palindrome guy) wrote:

    > If a goat may offer a point on the topic: a brochette is a skewer in
    > French. A dish cooked on a skewer is cooked "en brochette." While it
    > is two words in the original and not one, it is not a fabrication made
    > of whole cloth to name a dish of proteins grilled on skewers "X
    > enbrochette." Such language mutations are most common in Cajun and
    > creole constructions. That the restaurant in question calls itself
    > Atchafalaya even though it's in Houston would locate its cuisine
    > outside standard French usage but squarely inside rural Acadiana.
    >
    > While there is certainly not any single recipe for "X en brochette" or
    > even "X enbrochette," I'd assume the cooks at Atchafalaya in Houston
    > do follow something like a consistent method and ingredient list when
    > they prepare their evidently tasty dish.


    Ah. But then I only learned a smattering of French in high school and
    I've never been to Houston...

    FWIW, in South Africa, we like "sosaties" i.e. cubes of
    marinated/curried lamb/mutton (usually interspersed with various
    veggies/dried fruit) that are cooked on skewers. They're often cooked
    on a charcoal grill.

    Although the original idea was to use lamb/mutton - these days just
    about anything goes; some people cook cubes of chicken, beef or venison
    on skewers and still call them sosaties... I've even seen vegetarian
    sosaties e.g. chunks of bell pepper, onion, mushrooms, dried apricots
    etc. Might not be 'traditional' but still pretty tasty, IMHO.

    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

  4. #4
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya


    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > FWIW, in South Africa, we like "sosaties" i.e. cubes of
    > marinated/curried lamb/mutton (usually interspersed with various
    > veggies/dried fruit) that are cooked on skewers. They're often cooked
    > on a charcoal grill.
    >
    > Although the original idea was to use lamb/mutton - these days just
    > about anything goes; some people cook cubes of chicken, beef or venison
    > on skewers and still call them sosaties... I've even seen vegetarian
    > sosaties e.g. chunks of bell pepper, onion, mushrooms, dried apricots
    > etc. Might not be 'traditional' but still pretty tasty, IMHO.
    >


    Where does the word sosaties come from?



  5. #5
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    cybercat wrote:

    >
    > Where does the word sosaties come from?


    It's an Afrikaans word, which like many other languages evolved from
    others. I believe this particular word came from 'saus' i.e. the sauce
    or marinade part - and 'sate/satay' which refers to meat on skewers in
    other languages. Maybe it started out as saussate, who knows? All know
    for sure is that they taste good. <g>
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

  6. #6
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
    > If a goat may offer a point on the topic: a brochette is a skewer in
    > French. A dish cooked on a skewer is cooked "en brochette." While it
    > is two words in the original and not one, it is not a fabrication made
    > of whole cloth to name a dish of proteins grilled on skewers "X
    > enbrochette." Such language mutations are most common in Cajun and
    > creole constructions. That the restaurant in question calls itself
    > Atchafalaya even though it's in Houston would locate its cuisine
    > outside standard French usage but squarely inside rural Acadiana.
    >
    > While there is certainly not any single recipe for "X en brochette" or
    > even "X enbrochette," I'd assume the cooks at Atchafalaya in Houston
    > do follow something like a consistent method and ingredient list when
    > they prepare their evidently tasty dish.
    >
    > More about the Atchafalaya can be found here:
    > http://www.newyorker.com/archive/198...ARDS_000347146
    >
    > I mean the river in Louisiana, not the restaurant in Houston. John
    > McPhee is a great writer, and the subject is his equal in that piece.
    > Having seen at an early age the rivers and bayous he mentions in the
    > essay, I may have more of a sense of connectedness than many to the
    > story. I've fished in Old River, and most RFCers haven't. But I think
    > I can say that McPhee's story is wonderful, anyway.


    I'm not most, I've fished the Old River and throughout the Atchafalaya
    swamp area many times. Great fishing most of the time and, depending on
    where you launch, seldom crowded. Lots of good fishing water in there.

  7. #7
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya


    "modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > If a goat may offer a point on the topic: a brochette is a skewer in
    > French. A dish cooked on a skewer is cooked "en brochette." While it
    > is two words in the original and not one, it is not a fabrication made
    > of whole cloth to name a dish of proteins grilled on skewers "X
    > enbrochette." Such language mutations are most common in Cajun and
    > creole constructions. That the restaurant in question calls itself
    > Atchafalaya even though it's in Houston would locate its cuisine
    > outside standard French usage but squarely inside rural Acadiana.
    >
    > While there is certainly not any single recipe for "X en brochette" or
    > even "X enbrochette," I'd assume the cooks at Atchafalaya in Houston
    > do follow something like a consistent method and ingredient list when
    > they prepare their evidently tasty dish.
    >
    > More about the Atchafalaya can be found here:
    > http://www.newyorker.com/archive/198...ARDS_000347146
    >
    > I mean the river in Louisiana, not the restaurant in Houston. John
    > McPhee is a great writer, and the subject is his equal in that piece.
    > Having seen at an early age the rivers and bayous he mentions in the
    > essay, I may have more of a sense of connectedness than many to the
    > story. I've fished in Old River, and most RFCers haven't. But I think
    > I can say that McPhee's story is wonderful, anyway.
    > --


    I love Louisiana and Texas. They are like foreign countries in some
    delightful ways.

    Where the "asshole" bit came into this thread, for me, is when people who
    delight in "correcting" others hopped in. As usual, I automatically assumed
    that I was wrong, and sheepishly said, "oh, haha, that's how I remembered it
    from the menu 20 years ago." When in fact that was what was ON the blinking
    menu. It's a dish, not a gd French lesson. One of the elders in my family
    used to be a teacher, and is rude enough to "correct" people all the time.
    She uses the fact that she used to be a teacher to "justify" this. It
    doesn't help. She just comes off as petty, tightassed, and looking for any
    kind of ego boost she can get. Because she is so quick to do this, it often
    happens that she is wrong. Ahhhh. Happy moments for me come in most unusual
    places.



  8. #8
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya


    "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:18Tjm.113049$[email protected]..
    > cybercat wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Where does the word sosaties come from?

    >
    > It's an Afrikaans word, which like many other languages evolved from
    > others. I believe this particular word came from 'saus' i.e. the sauce
    > or marinade part - and 'sate/satay' which refers to meat on skewers in
    > other languages. Maybe it started out as saussate, who knows? All know
    > for sure is that they taste good. <g>
    > --

    Afrikaans I think comes from Dutch and German and African? Satay sounds
    Indian. Interesting. (I'm not going to tell you you're calling the dish the
    wrong thing ...)



  9. #9
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    cybercat wrote:

    >
    > "ChattyCathy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:18Tjm.113049$[email protected]..
    >> cybercat wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Where does the word sosaties come from?

    >>
    >> It's an Afrikaans word, which like many other languages evolved from
    >> others. I believe this particular word came from 'saus' i.e. the
    >> sauce or marinade part - and 'sate/satay' which refers to meat on
    >> skewers in other languages. Maybe it started out as saussate, who
    >> knows? All know for sure is that they taste good. <g>
    >> --

    > Afrikaans I think comes from Dutch and German and African?


    Mainly Dutch, but quite a few other languages have contributed words and
    phrases...

    > Satay sounds Indian. Interesting.


    It's also known as such in Indonesia and Malaysia - and sosaties are a
    typical Cape Malay dish.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sate

    > (I'm not going to tell you you're calling the dish the wrong
    > thing ...)


    Thankyewverymuch ;-)

    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 16:19:39 +0200, ChattyCathy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >cybercat wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Where does the word sosaties come from?

    >
    >It's an Afrikaans word, which like many other languages evolved from
    >others. I believe this particular word came from 'saus' i.e. the sauce
    >or marinade part - and 'sate/satay' which refers to meat on skewers in
    >other languages. Maybe it started out as saussate, who knows? All know
    >for sure is that they taste good. <g>


    Is it a standard recipe or does it vary?

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 10:33:43 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >
    >I love Louisiana and Texas. They are like foreign countries in some
    >delightful ways.
    >
    >Where the "asshole" bit came into this thread, for me, is when people who
    >delight in "correcting" others hopped in. As usual, I automatically assumed
    >that I was wrong, and sheepishly said, "oh, haha, that's how I remembered it
    >from the menu 20 years ago." When in fact that was what was ON the blinking
    >menu. It's a dish, not a gd French lesson. One of the elders in my family
    >used to be a teacher, and is rude enough to "correct" people all the time.
    >She uses the fact that she used to be a teacher to "justify" this. It
    >doesn't help. She just comes off as petty, tightassed, and looking for any
    >kind of ego boost she can get. Because she is so quick to do this, it often
    >happens that she is wrong. Ahhhh. Happy moments for me come in most unusual
    >places.
    >

    If you're talking to me, it was an honest question. I didn't know
    what an embrochette was. I had already looked it up and it seemed to
    vary. I wanted to know what you were talking about, but you've been
    on a real tear the last couple of days.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  12. #12
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    On Aug 22, 9:19*am, ChattyCathy <cathy1...@mailinator.com> wrote:
    > cybercat wrote:
    >
    > > Where does the word sosaties come from?

    >
    > It's an Afrikaans word, which like many other languages evolved from
    > others. I believe this particular word came from 'saus' i.e. the sauce
    > or marinade part - and 'sate/satay' which refers to meat on skewers in
    > other languages. Maybe it started out as saussate, who knows? All know
    > for sure is that they taste good. <g>
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Chatty Cathy


    Did you know that the proper name for Shish Ka Bob
    is . . . . . . . . . Shish Ka Robert?
    L in F

  13. #13
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 10:33:43 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >>
    >>I love Louisiana and Texas. They are like foreign countries in some
    >>delightful ways.
    >>
    >>Where the "asshole" bit came into this thread, for me, is when people who
    >>delight in "correcting" others hopped in. As usual, I automatically
    >>assumed
    >>that I was wrong, and sheepishly said, "oh, haha, that's how I remembered
    >>it
    >>from the menu 20 years ago." When in fact that was what was ON the
    >>blinking
    >>menu. It's a dish, not a gd French lesson. One of the elders in my family
    >>used to be a teacher, and is rude enough to "correct" people all the time.
    >>She uses the fact that she used to be a teacher to "justify" this. It
    >>doesn't help. She just comes off as petty, tightassed, and looking for any
    >>kind of ego boost she can get. Because she is so quick to do this, it
    >>often
    >>happens that she is wrong. Ahhhh. Happy moments for me come in most
    >>unusual
    >>places.
    >>

    > If you're talking to me, it was an honest question. I didn't know
    > what an embrochette was. I had already looked it up and it seemed to
    > vary. I wanted to know what you were talking about, but you've been
    > on a real tear the last couple of days.
    >


    Whoah, there, Nelly. If I were talking to you I would address you. I was
    talking about Goomba, and others like her.



  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 14:37:55 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Whoah, there, Nelly. If I were talking to you I would address you. I was
    >talking about Goomba, and others like her.


    Well, then please tell me about what you remember as embrochette! I
    saw a lot of skewered horseradish filled shrimp recipes and I'm not so
    sure that's what you were talking about.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  15. #15
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 14:37:55 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Whoah, there, Nelly. If I were talking to you I would address you. I was
    >>talking about Goomba, and others like her.

    >
    > Well, then please tell me about what you remember as embrochette! I
    > saw a lot of skewered horseradish filled shrimp recipes and I'm not so
    > sure that's what you were talking about.
    >


    It was a skewer with what looked like little bacon balls on it, but when
    you cut into them, they had scallops and oysters!!! Grilled, and served with
    a lemon wedge to squeeze on and a ramekin of red sauce that was kind of
    sweet, kind of spicy, not quite bbq sauce, def. not cocktail sauce. Very
    nice. I usually had these and the crawfish etouffee. Which at that
    restaurant (Atchafalaya River Cafe, the original incarnation, circa 1985 in
    Houston TC) had a creamy sauce, not a tomato-based sauce, as I recall. BUT I
    COULD BE WRONG. It HAS happened.



  16. #16
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 16:10:32 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 14:37:55 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:


    >It was a skewer with what looked like little bacon balls on it, but when
    >you cut into them, they had scallops and oysters!!! Grilled, and served with
    >a lemon wedge to squeeze on and a ramekin of red sauce that was kind of
    >sweet, kind of spicy, not quite bbq sauce, def. not cocktail sauce. Very
    >nice. I usually had these and the crawfish etouffee. Which at that
    >restaurant (Atchafalaya River Cafe, the original incarnation, circa 1985 in
    >Houston TC) had a creamy sauce, not a tomato-based sauce, as I recall. BUT I
    >COULD BE WRONG. It HAS happened.


    You are NOT wrong, Dear. Was the sauce, perhaps, a free-form
    remoulade?

    NB> Cajun remoulade does NOT resemble in any way the French
    stuff that is called by the same name.

    Alex, who has eaten Cajun and Creole remoulade all over LA.

  17. #17
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya


    "Chemiker" <[email protected]> wrote


    > Was the sauce, perhaps, a free-form
    > remoulade?
    >
    > NB> Cajun remoulade does NOT resemble in any way the French
    > stuff that is called by the same name.
    >


    Could have been!



  18. #18
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
    > If a goat may offer a point on the topic: a brochette is a skewer in
    > French. A dish cooked on a skewer is cooked "en brochette." While it
    > is two words in the original and not one, it is not a fabrication made
    > of whole cloth to name a dish of proteins grilled on skewers "X
    > enbrochette." Such language mutations are most common in Cajun and
    > creole constructions. That the restaurant in question calls itself
    > Atchafalaya even though it's in Houston would locate its cuisine
    > outside standard French usage but squarely inside rural Acadiana.
    >
    > While there is certainly not any single recipe for "X en brochette" or
    > even "X enbrochette," I'd assume the cooks at Atchafalaya in Houston
    > do follow something like a consistent method and ingredient list when
    > they prepare their evidently tasty dish.
    >
    > More about the Atchafalaya can be found here:
    > http://www.newyorker.com/archive/198...ARDS_000347146
    >
    > I mean the river in Louisiana, not the restaurant in Houston. John
    > McPhee is a great writer, and the subject is his equal in that piece.
    > Having seen at an early age the rivers and bayous he mentions in the
    > essay, I may have more of a sense of connectedness than many to the
    > story. I've fished in Old River, and most RFCers haven't. But I think
    > I can say that McPhee's story is wonderful, anyway.
    >


    It sure is nice to have you back.


    Becca

    ObFood: For lunch yesterday I had a beef bologna sandwich on 7-grain
    bread "dressed" with my-nez.






  19. #19
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    sf wrote:

    > On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 16:19:39 +0200, ChattyCathy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>cybercat wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Where does the word sosaties come from?

    >>
    >>It's an Afrikaans word, which like many other languages evolved from
    >>others. I believe this particular word came from 'saus' i.e. the sauce
    >>or marinade part - and 'sate/satay' which refers to meat on skewers in
    >>other languages. Maybe it started out as saussate, who knows? All know
    >>for sure is that they taste good. <g>

    >
    > Is it a standard recipe or does it vary?
    >

    Heh. I've had plenty of variations, and they were all good... Of course,
    a lot of folks have their own 'secret' family recipes (handed down from
    their great-great-grandmas) - but IME, the marinade always contains
    some form of 'curry powder'. (Various types of pre-mixed packages
    of 'curry powder' are sold here, but a lot of people buy the individual
    spices/chilies sold at the markets and grind/mix their own, thereby
    catering to their own tastes.)

    The other ingredients in the marinade vary - most people use apricot jam
    but you can add some ground ginger, cinnamon, garlic (of course) and
    some red wine. (Some people use lemon juice instead of wine, but I
    prefer the wine <eg>.)

    Dried apricots are a must though - and are placed on the skewers in
    between the chunks of lamb/mutton; pieces of onion, and sometimes
    chunks of bell pepper are often used too. However, AFAIAA, a 'genuine'
    sosatie is supposed to be made with lamb/mutton (not chicken or beef).
    Otherwise they'd just be known as kebabs/kabobs (or however you spell
    it in your neck of the woods). Probably wouldn't appeal to you tho' -
    as I seem to recall you are not that fond of anything that
    contains 'curry'.
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

  20. #20
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: en brochette and the Atchafalaya

    On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 16:37:19 -0500, Chemiker wrote:

    > On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 16:10:32 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>> On Sat, 22 Aug 2009 14:37:55 -0400, "cybercat" <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:

    >
    >>It was a skewer with what looked like little bacon balls on it, but when
    >>you cut into them, they had scallops and oysters!!! Grilled, and served with
    >>a lemon wedge to squeeze on and a ramekin of red sauce that was kind of
    >>sweet, kind of spicy, not quite bbq sauce, def. not cocktail sauce. Very
    >>nice. I usually had these and the crawfish etouffee. Which at that
    >>restaurant (Atchafalaya River Cafe, the original incarnation, circa 1985 in
    >>Houston TC) had a creamy sauce, not a tomato-based sauce, as I recall. BUT I
    >>COULD BE WRONG. It HAS happened.

    >
    > You are NOT wrong, Dear. Was the sauce, perhaps, a free-form
    > remoulade?
    >
    > NB> Cajun remoulade does NOT resemble in any way the French
    > stuff that is called by the same name.
    >
    > Alex, who has eaten Cajun and Creole remoulade all over LA.


    i *thought* i remembered it was you that made the remoulade tour.

    your pal,
    blake

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