Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 54

Thread: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

  1. #1
    Jonathan Kamens Guest

    Default Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    Greetings,

    At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    (like, e.g.,
    http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...&T1=KTA+KHM3WH)
    every 2-3 years. We don't use the mixer that
    often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.

    Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    to keep making chocolate chip cookies?

    (Yes, we could get it fixed, but I'm pretty certain that
    getting it fixed costs more than buying a new mixer.)

    (Yes, a real stand mixer would almost certainly solve this
    problem, but we wouldn't use one often enough to justify the
    expense, and besides, we don't have space for one in our
    kitchen.)

    Thanks in advance for any suggestions you can provide.

    --
    Jews for Obama (http://www.jews4obama.com/)

  2. #2
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    On Aug 4, 3:20�pm, j...@kamens.brookline.ma.us (Jonathan Kamens)
    wrote:
    > Greetings,
    >
    > At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    > (like, e.g.,http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...ndmixers&T1=KT...)
    > every 2-3 years. �We don't use the mixer that
    > often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    > always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    > smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    > smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.
    >
    > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?


    Even the best hand mixers won't stand up long to mixing heavy doughs
    like for cookies. I have a 7 speed KitchenAid that's great for
    whipping and mixing batters but I don't think it would last long on a
    steady diet of mixing stiff cookie doughs.

  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    Jonathan Kamens wrote:
    >
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as
    > we want to keep making chocolate chip cookies?


    You're doomed as long as you use the wrong tool
    for the purpose. Cookie dough is way too thick
    for mixing with a handheld electric mixer.
    It's like using a knife as a screwdriver and
    complaining when the tip breaks off.

  4. #4
    Daniel Ganek Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    Jonathan Kamens wrote:
    > Greetings,
    >
    > At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    > (like, e.g.,
    > http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...&T1=KTA+KHM3WH)
    > every 2-3 years. We don't use the mixer that
    > often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    > always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    > smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    > smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.
    >
    > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?
    >
    > (Yes, we could get it fixed, but I'm pretty certain that
    > getting it fixed costs more than buying a new mixer.)
    >
    > (Yes, a real stand mixer would almost certainly solve this
    > problem, but we wouldn't use one often enough to justify the
    > expense, and besides, we don't have space for one in our
    > kitchen.)
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any suggestions you can provide.
    >


    I wouldn't use a hand mixer for cookie dough but KitchenAid does
    make a dough hook for the model you picked (the cheapest by the way).
    Were you using the dough hook? Using beaters for dough is guaranteed
    to burn out the motor. I'd also go with the strongest mixer I could get;
    i.e. the 9-speed KA.

    /da

  5. #5
    T Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    In article <g77kpf$2bm$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...

    > (Yes, a real stand mixer would almost certainly solve this
    > problem, but we wouldn't use one often enough to justify the
    > expense, and besides, we don't have space for one in our
    > kitchen.)
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any suggestions you can provide.


    I've got an older (90's) Sunbeam Mixmaster stand/detachable unit that
    just goes and goes. I paid $50 for it though now I see they want $169 or
    so for the same thing.

    However their hand mixers are based on the classic:

    http://www.sunbeam.com/category.aspx...=kitchen&cid=6


  6. #6
    Jonathan Kamens Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> writes:
    >You're doomed as long as you use the wrong tool
    >for the purpose. Cookie dough is way too thick
    >for mixing with a handheld electric mixer.


    I suppose I should have been clear that when the dough gets
    too thick for the hand mixer, we switch to a spoon. Granted,
    perhaps we are not switching soon enough, and perhaps that is
    what is causing our mixers to die a premature death, but I was
    hoping that perhaps there is a better answer than that...

    --
    Jews for Obama (http://www.jews4obama.com/)

  7. #7
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    Jonathan Kamens wrote:

    > Greetings,
    >
    > At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    > (like, e.g.,
    > http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...&T1=KTA+KHM3WH)
    > every 2-3 years. We don't use the mixer that
    > often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    > always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    > smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    > smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.
    >
    > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?
    >
    > (Yes, we could get it fixed, but I'm pretty certain that
    > getting it fixed costs more than buying a new mixer.)
    >
    > (Yes, a real stand mixer would almost certainly solve this
    > problem, but we wouldn't use one often enough to justify the
    > expense, and besides, we don't have space for one in our
    > kitchen.)
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any suggestions you can provide.


    That is the same hand held mixer that I have been using for years and mine is
    still going strong. I use it for chocolate chip cooks, meat loaf and other tough
    jobs and it works fine.


    >
    >
    > --
    > Jews for Obama (http://www.jews4obama.com/)



  8. #8
    Brian Christiansen Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?


    "Jonathan Kamens" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:g77kpf$2bm$[email protected]..

    > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?
    >


    Well, I use either a pastry cutter
    (http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cookbook:Pastry_Cutter) or a potato masher,
    which I think works better than a pastry cutter, to cream the butter and
    eggs together, then a wooden spoon to stir in the chocolate chips and the
    optional nuts. Neither of those things burn out.

    I have mixed the cookies using an electric device like a mixer or food
    processor from time to time, but it is neither faster nor "easier" than
    using the hand tools, at least in my opinion. It is just more clean up.

    You can even mix the chips in with your hands as the following recipe
    recommends: http://theppk.com/recipes/dbrecipes/...p?RecipeID=111. I
    have never done it that way, but I would highly recommend washing your hands
    before doing the mixing, even though you washed your hands, or at least
    should have, before you started cooking.

    I don't know if you use the mixer for something else, but the bottom line is
    that cooking had been done with hand tools for a lot more of human history
    than power tools, and quite often, they are actually the better choice
    (though one time I tried making mayonnaise with a whisk, and that is just
    for the birds).

    Brian Christiansen



  9. #9
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    On Aug 4, 2:20*pm, j...@kamens.brookline.ma.us (Jonathan Kamens)
    wrote:
    > Greetings,
    >
    > At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    > (like, e.g.,http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...ndmixers&T1=KT...)
    > every 2-3 years. *We don't use the mixer that
    > often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    > always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    > smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    > smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.
    >
    > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?
    >
    > (Yes, we could get it fixed, but I'm pretty certain that
    > getting it fixed costs more than buying a new mixer.)
    >
    > (Yes, a real stand mixer would almost certainly solve this
    > problem, but we wouldn't use one often enough to justify the
    > expense, and besides, we don't have space for one in our
    > kitchen.)
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any suggestions you can provide.
    >
    > --
    > Jews for Obama (http://www.jews4obama.com/)


    Dunno. I have a KA hand mixer, the 6 speed, and I've used it at least
    once or twice a week for about a decade now. I'm thinking about
    getting a 7-speed, with a whip attachment, actually.

    N.

  10. #10
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    On Aug 4, 3:17*pm, "Brian Christiansen" <brian_christi...@hotmail.com>
    wrote:
    > "Jonathan Kamens" <j...@kamens.brookline.ma.us> wrote in message
    >
    > news:g77kpf$2bm$[email protected]..
    >
    > > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?

    >
    > Well, I use either a pastry cutter
    > (http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Cookbook:Pastry_Cutter) or a potato masher,
    > which I think works better than a pastry cutter, to cream the butter and
    > eggs together, then a wooden spoon to stir in the chocolate chips and the
    > optional nuts. *Neither of those things burn out.
    >
    > I have mixed the cookies using an electric device like a mixer or food
    > processor from time to time, but it is neither faster nor "easier" than
    > using the hand tools, at least in my opinion. It is just more clean *up..
    >
    > You can even mix the chips in with your hands as the following recipe
    > recommends:http://theppk.com/recipes/dbrecipes/...p?RecipeID=111. *I
    > have never done it that way, but I would highly recommend washing your hands
    > before doing the mixing, even though you washed your hands, or at least
    > should have, before you started cooking.
    >
    > I don't know if you use the mixer for something else, but the bottom lineis
    > that cooking had been done with hand tools for a lot more of human history
    > than power tools, and quite often, they are actually the better choice
    > (though one time I tried making mayonnaise with a whisk, and that is just
    > for the birds).
    >
    > Brian Christiansen


    I can't think of anything easier than creaming shortening and sugar
    with an electric stand mixer. Clean-up? Pshaw, a quick hot-water
    wash (under the running water) with a little soap smeared on, and the
    beaters are good to go. Plus, I can finish the recipe in the stand
    mixer, using only that one bowl and a spatula. I'd never try creaming
    shortening and sugar by hand - it just doesn't work as well. IMO, of
    course.

    As for the OP, I can't imagine mixing cookie dough with a hand mixer.
    I use mine sometimes for brownie batter (homemade- it's thinner than a
    box mix, actually), frosting, and beating eggs for whatever. That's
    about all I use it for.

    N.

  11. #11
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    Jonathan Kamens wrote:
    > Greetings,
    >
    > At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    > (like, e.g.,
    > http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...&T1=KTA+KHM3WH)
    > every 2-3 years. We don't use the mixer that
    > often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    > always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    > smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    > smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.
    >
    > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?
    >
    > (Yes, we could get it fixed, but I'm pretty certain that
    > getting it fixed costs more than buying a new mixer.)
    >
    > (Yes, a real stand mixer would almost certainly solve this
    > problem, but we wouldn't use one often enough to justify the
    > expense, and besides, we don't have space for one in our
    > kitchen.)
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any suggestions you can provide.
    >



    The ad for your mixer says it's "powerful enough to mix double batches
    of cookie dough" If that's their claim, they should stand by it. Have
    you contacted them?

    Personally, I mix heavy cookie dough by hand. It helps to establish the
    calorie deficit so I can eat more cookies without getting fat :-)

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
    Good Friends. Good Life

  12. #12
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?


    Jonathan Kamens wrote:
    > Greetings,
    >
    > At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    > (like, e.g.,
    > http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...&T1=KTA+KHM3WH)
    > every 2-3 years. We don't use the mixer that
    > often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    > always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    > smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    > smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.
    >
    > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?
    >
    > (Yes, we could get it fixed, but I'm pretty certain that
    > getting it fixed costs more than buying a new mixer.)
    >
    > (Yes, a real stand mixer would almost certainly solve this
    > problem, but we wouldn't use one often enough to justify the
    > expense, and besides, we don't have space for one in our
    > kitchen.)
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any suggestions you can provide.
    >



    Was it really a Kitchenaid, or was it maybe a Sunbeam that kind of looks
    like the one you linked?

    Bob

  13. #13
    Robert Klute Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    On Mon, 4 Aug 2008 20:08:06 +0000 (UTC), [email protected]
    (Jonathan Kamens) wrote:

    >Mark Thorson <[email protected]> writes:
    >>You're doomed as long as you use the wrong tool
    >>for the purpose. Cookie dough is way too thick
    >>for mixing with a handheld electric mixer.

    >
    >I suppose I should have been clear that when the dough gets
    >too thick for the hand mixer, we switch to a spoon. Granted,
    >perhaps we are not switching soon enough, and perhaps that is
    >what is causing our mixers to die a premature death, but I was
    >hoping that perhaps there is a better answer than that...



    Probably time to switch to a stand mixer. You can get a refurbished
    tilt head for $169.00. That's not much more than the cost of 2 of the 7
    speed hand mixers or 3 of the 3 speeds. For $200 you can get the heavy
    duty 5-qt Professional model (475 Watts, all metal construction).

    http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...AND&HDR=outlet

    FWIW, the 3 speed has a 170 Watt motor.

  14. #14
    Julia Altshuler Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    Jonathan Kamens wrote:
    >
    > I suppose I should have been clear that when the dough gets
    > too thick for the hand mixer, we switch to a spoon. Granted,
    > perhaps we are not switching soon enough, and perhaps that is
    > what is causing our mixers to die a premature death, but I was
    > hoping that perhaps there is a better answer than that...



    I mix cookies by hand with a metal spoon and have never had a problem.
    The only reasons I'd be tempted to use a standup mixer or other
    electronic help would be:


    if I were making an especially large batch as though making them
    commercially

    if I had arthritis or other medical condition which made using my arm in
    that way difficult.


    I thought there would be a whole list, but I can only come up with the 2
    possibilities. If you don't have either of these, I'd suggest just
    mixing by hand from the start. You can let the fact that the hand
    mixers die prematurely, or you can say that clean-up is easier.


    Good reasons for using the hand held mixer: egg white and cream. And
    even then, a hand whip works fine.


    --Lia


  15. #15
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    In article <g77kpf$2bm$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Jonathan Kamens) wrote:

    > Thanks in advance for any suggestions you can provide.


    I'm very happy with my Braun Multi-Mix unit. Includes a stick blender,
    chopper, and a tall container for doing some stick blending. Don't know
    if they still sell it, but it does what I need it to do when I don't
    want to haul out the KA stand mixer.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller , blahblahblog is back and
    is being updated quite regularly now.
    "rec.food.cooking Preserved Fruit Administrator
    'Always in a jam. Never in a stew.'" - Evergene

  16. #16
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    On Mon 04 Aug 2008 12:20:15p, Jonathan Kamens told us...

    > Greetings,
    >
    > At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    > (like, e.g.,
    > http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...xers&T1=KTA+KH
    > M3WH) every 2-3 years. We don't use the mixer that
    > often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    > always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    > smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    > smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.
    >
    > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?
    >
    > (Yes, we could get it fixed, but I'm pretty certain that
    > getting it fixed costs more than buying a new mixer.)
    >
    > (Yes, a real stand mixer would almost certainly solve this
    > problem, but we wouldn't use one often enough to justify the
    > expense, and besides, we don't have space for one in our
    > kitchen.)
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any suggestions you can provide.
    >


    I don't know of a current model hand mixer that I would recommend, as I
    haven't needed a new one.

    My dad bought my mother a "Dormey" hand mixer made by Dormeyer in 1954.
    She used it until she passed away in 1998, and I have been using it since
    then. I also happen to have a KitchenAid stand mixer, but I still use the
    hand mixer for many things.

    The are frequently sold on eBay. Currently there are two for sale. If you
    don't mind buying something used, buy one of these.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Dormeyer-Dormey-...xer-Model-7500
    _W0QQitemZ160267075932QQihZ006QQcategoryZ11653QQss PageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZ
    ViewItem

    or

    http://tinyurl.com/5zerga

    As a side note, I have since bought two of these mixers on eBay "just in
    case" mine dies. I doubt that it will, though, so here I sit with three of
    them. :-) Oh, the two on eBay are *not* being sold by me.


    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Monday, 08(VIII)/04(IV)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    -------------------------------------------
    Where am I going, and why am I in this
    handbasket?
    -------------------------------------------




  17. #17
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    On Mon 04 Aug 2008 12:20:15p, Jonathan Kamens told us...

    > Greetings,
    >
    > At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    > (like, e.g.,
    > http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...xers&T1=KTA+KH
    > M3WH) every 2-3 years. We don't use the mixer that
    > often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    > always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    > smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    > smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.
    >
    > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?
    >
    > (Yes, we could get it fixed, but I'm pretty certain that
    > getting it fixed costs more than buying a new mixer.)
    >
    > (Yes, a real stand mixer would almost certainly solve this
    > problem, but we wouldn't use one often enough to justify the
    > expense, and besides, we don't have space for one in our
    > kitchen.)
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any suggestions you can provide.
    >


    I would not be happy with anything currently on the market. However, some
    of the older hand mixers have survived decades of use.

    My dad bought my mother a "Dormey" hand mixer made by Dormeyer in 1954.
    She used it until 1998 when she passed away. I now have it and use it
    regularly, although I also have a KitchenAid stand mixer that I use for
    heavier mixtures.

    You can usually find one on eBay, in fact, they are several currently
    listed now. Here is one:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Dormeyer-Dormey-...xer-Model-7500
    _W0QQitemZ160267075932QQihZ006QQcategoryZ11653QQss PageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZ
    ViewItem

    OR

    http://tinyurl.com/5zerga

    If you don't mind buying something used, I can't recommend this highly
    enough.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Monday, 08(VIII)/04(IV)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    -------------------------------------------
    Where am I going, and why am I in this
    handbasket?
    -------------------------------------------




  18. #18
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    >I'm very happy with my Braun Multi-Mix unit. Includes a stick blender,
    > chopper, and a tall container for doing some stick blending. Don't know
    > if they still sell it, but it does what I need it to do when I don't
    > want to haul out the KA stand mixer.


    I have the Braun, too. I wouldn't even consider
    using it on cookie dough.

  19. #19
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?


    "Jonathan Kamens" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:g77kpf$2bm$[email protected]..
    > Greetings,
    >
    > At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    > (like, e.g.,
    > http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...&T1=KTA+KHM3WH)
    > every 2-3 years. We don't use the mixer that
    > often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    > always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    > smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    > smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.
    >
    > Having once again smelled the smoke of hand-mixer doom, we are
    > once again in the market for a new one, and so I thought I'd
    > post and ask: is there a mixer on the market that won't give
    > up the ghost after a few years (and if so where can we get
    > it), or are we doomed to continue contributing to the
    > ever-growing global waste disposal problem as long as we want
    > to keep making chocolate chip cookies?



    http://www.cooking.com/products/shprodde.asp?SKU=142281

    You need a mixer with dough hooks for making cookies,
    Or get a kitchen aid.


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)




  20. #20
    Cuthbert Thistlethwaite Guest

    Default Re: Electric hand mixer that won't burn out?

    Jonathan Kamens wrote:
    >
    > Greetings,
    >
    > At our house, we seem to go through an electric hand mixer
    > (like, e.g.,
    > http://www.shopkitchenaid.com/produc...&T1=KTA+KHM3WH)
    > every 2-3 years. We don't use the mixer that
    > often, maybe two or three times per month, and yet there
    > always comes a time when the blades stop spinning and wisps of
    > smoke come drifting out of the motor, along with the awful
    > smell of a motor that shell spin its blades no more.


    Symptoms precisely describe crap made in China, especially if they occur
    immediately after the return limit date.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32