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Thread: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

  1. #1
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    Anyone got a recipe? (Yes, I already googled it and found
    a few.)

    My sister is looking for either the recipe or somewhere to
    buy online (she lives in Montana so not likely to find a
    store that sells Egyptian groceries).

    She says they're quite different than Moroccan preserved
    lemons. Not nearly as salty for one thing. And they are
    use more as a condiment than just for cooking with like
    the Moroccan ones.

    I just wondered if anyone here has any knowledge of the
    Egyptian style of preserved/pickled lemons.

    Thanks,
    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  2. #2
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    On Jan 24, 12:15*pm, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.nospam.edu> wrote:
    > Anyone got a recipe? *(Yes, I already googled it and found
    > a few.)
    >
    > My sister is looking for either the recipe or somewhere to
    > buy online (she lives in Montana so not likely to find a
    > store that sells Egyptian groceries).
    >
    > She says they're quite different than Moroccan preserved
    > lemons. *Not nearly as salty for one thing. *And they are
    > use more as a condiment than just for cooking with like
    > the Moroccan ones.
    >
    > I just wondered if anyone here has any knowledge of the
    > Egyptian style of preserved/pickled lemons.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Kate
    >
    > --
    > Kate Connally
    > “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    > Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    > Until you bite their heads off.”
    > What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    > mailto:conna...@pitt.edu


    found this

    http://members.cox.net/ahmedheissa/reclemon.htm


    http://books.google.com/books?id=C7E...page&q&f=false

    and this:

    moon Mokhalel (Pickled Lemons or Limes)

    Combined Ingredients and Instructions:
    Wash the lemons very good, put them in a pot with some water and boil
    them for 1-2 minutes. Remove the lemons from the boiling water
    immediately.

    Mix together the salt, saffron, black seeds, and finally some good
    shata. When the lemons have cooled down a bit prick each one with your
    finger or a knife and put some of the mixture into each one and
    arrange the stuffed lemons in a jar. Make layers of stuffed lemons and
    sprinkle each layer with a bit of the mixture.

    When you have finished with all the lemons that are to be pickled,
    fill 1/2 the jar with olive oil or vegetable oil the other 1/2 with
    lemon juice ( use only fresh lemon juice) you can peal the lemons like
    oranges, split them in half and remove the seeds, and then put them in
    the food processor and pure, you can add some Jalapeneos that have
    been slashed slightly to pickle with the lemons and to add a bit of
    zest to them.

    At the top of the jar put some oil to seal the top and pack in some
    regular lemon halves to force the pickled lemons at below the oil and
    juice. Cover with an air tight lid and let the jar sit in a dark place
    for a few days.

    If you want to enjoy these pickled lemons, they are best when you eat
    them with some cooked sabanekh Ala Egyptian way.


    hope this helps.

  3. #3
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    Kate wrote on Mon, 24 Jan 2011 15:15:22 -0500:

    > My sister is looking for either the recipe or somewhere to
    > buy online (she lives in Montana so not likely to find a
    > store that sells Egyptian groceries).


    > She says they're quite different than Moroccan preserved
    > lemons. Not nearly as salty for one thing. And they are
    > use more as a condiment than just for cooking with like
    > the Moroccan ones.


    > I just wondered if anyone here has any knowledge of the
    > Egyptian style of preserved/pickled lemons.


    I don't know them as specifically Egyptian but as Southern
    Mediterranean. I can buy them around DC but here are a couple of
    recipes. I also have a Moroccan recipe for chicken with pickled lemons
    that's pretty good.

    Preserved Lemons



    4 lg lemons; (preferably; thin-skinned), scrubbed (about 6 ounces each)

    2/3 c kosher salt

    1 c fresh lemon juice; (from about 5 large lemons)

    olive oil



    Dry lemons and cut each into 8 wedges. In a bowl toss wedges with salt
    and transfer to a glass jar (about 6-cup capacity). Add lemon juice and
    cover jar with a tight-fitting glass lid or plastic-coated lid. Let
    lemons stand at room temperature 7 days, shaking jar each day to
    redistribute salt and juice. (Note from JVS: The amount of salt is
    enough to produce a saturated solution so I believe shaking only will
    homogenize the liquid). Add oil to cover lemons and store, covered and
    chilled, up to 6 months.



    Fast preserved lemons



    3 washed lemons

    3 tabs coarse salt

    3 tabs white vinegar

    3 cups water



    Cut a slot in the middle of the lemons and stuff with 1 tab salt.

    Put in quart jar and add water and vinegar. Stand in pot with water up
    to liquid level, boil and simmer 30 minutes.


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  4. #4
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    ImStillMags wrote:
    > On Jan 24, 12:15 pm, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.nospam.edu> wrote:
    >> Anyone got a recipe? (Yes, I already googled it and found
    >> a few.)
    >>
    >> My sister is looking for either the recipe or somewhere to
    >> buy online (she lives in Montana so not likely to find a
    >> store that sells Egyptian groceries).
    >>
    >> She says they're quite different than Moroccan preserved
    >> lemons. Not nearly as salty for one thing. And they are
    >> use more as a condiment than just for cooking with like
    >> the Moroccan ones.
    >>
    >> I just wondered if anyone here has any knowledge of the
    >> Egyptian style of preserved/pickled lemons.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Kate
    >>
    >> --
    >> Kate Connally
    >> “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    >> Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    >> Until you bite their heads off.”
    >> What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    >> mailto:conna...@pitt.edu

    >
    > found this
    >
    > http://members.cox.net/ahmedheissa/reclemon.htm
    >
    >
    > http://books.google.com/books?id=C7E...page&q&f=false
    >
    > and this:
    >
    > moon Mokhalel (Pickled Lemons or Limes)
    >
    > Combined Ingredients and Instructions:
    > Wash the lemons very good, put them in a pot with some water and boil
    > them for 1-2 minutes. Remove the lemons from the boiling water
    > immediately.
    >
    > Mix together the salt, saffron, black seeds, and finally some good
    > shata. When the lemons have cooled down a bit prick each one with your
    > finger or a knife and put some of the mixture into each one and
    > arrange the stuffed lemons in a jar. Make layers of stuffed lemons and
    > sprinkle each layer with a bit of the mixture.
    >
    > When you have finished with all the lemons that are to be pickled,
    > fill 1/2 the jar with olive oil or vegetable oil the other 1/2 with
    > lemon juice ( use only fresh lemon juice) you can peal the lemons like
    > oranges, split them in half and remove the seeds, and then put them in
    > the food processor and pure, you can add some Jalapeneos that have
    > been slashed slightly to pickle with the lemons and to add a bit of
    > zest to them.
    >
    > At the top of the jar put some oil to seal the top and pack in some
    > regular lemon halves to force the pickled lemons at below the oil and
    > juice. Cover with an air tight lid and let the jar sit in a dark place
    > for a few days.
    >
    > If you want to enjoy these pickled lemons, they are best when you eat
    > them with some cooked sabanekh Ala Egyptian way.
    >
    >
    > hope this helps.


    Hmm. Shata is an Egyptian hot sauce. Black seeds? Would that be
    black cumin?

    --
    Jean B.

  5. #5
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    On Jan 24, 3:01*pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    > ImStillMags wrote:
    > > On Jan 24, 12:15 pm, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.nospam.edu> wrote:
    > >> Anyone got a recipe? *(Yes, I already googled it and found
    > >> a few.)

    >
    > >> My sister is looking for either the recipe or somewhere to
    > >> buy online (she lives in Montana so not likely to find a
    > >> store that sells Egyptian groceries).

    >
    > >> She says they're quite different than Moroccan preserved
    > >> lemons. *Not nearly as salty for one thing. *And they are
    > >> use more as a condiment than just for cooking with like
    > >> the Moroccan ones.

    >
    > >> I just wondered if anyone here has any knowledge of the
    > >> Egyptian style of preserved/pickled lemons.

    >
    > >> Thanks,
    > >> Kate

    >
    > >> --
    > >> Kate Connally
    > >> “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    > >> Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    > >> Until you bite their heads off.”
    > >> What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    > >> mailto:conna...@pitt.edu

    >
    > > found this

    >
    > >http://members.cox.net/ahmedheissa/reclemon.htm

    >
    > >http://books.google.com/books?id=C7E...pg=PA12&dq=egy...

    >
    > > and this:

    >
    > > moon Mokhalel (Pickled Lemons or Limes)

    >
    > > Combined Ingredients and Instructions:
    > > Wash the lemons very good, put them in a pot with some water and boil
    > > them for 1-2 minutes. Remove the lemons from the boiling water
    > > immediately.

    >
    > > Mix together the salt, saffron, black seeds, and finally some good
    > > shata. When the lemons have cooled down a bit prick each one with your
    > > finger or a knife and put some of the mixture into each one and
    > > arrange the stuffed lemons in a jar. Make layers of stuffed lemons and
    > > sprinkle each layer with a bit of the mixture.

    >
    > > When you have finished with all the lemons that are to be pickled,
    > > fill 1/2 the jar with olive oil or vegetable oil the other 1/2 with
    > > lemon juice ( use only fresh lemon juice) you can peal the lemons like
    > > oranges, split them in half and remove the seeds, and then put them in
    > > the food processor and pure, you can add some Jalapeneos that have
    > > been slashed slightly to pickle with the lemons and to add a bit of
    > > zest to them.

    >
    > > At the top of the jar put some oil to seal the top and pack in some
    > > regular lemon halves to force the pickled lemons at below the oil and
    > > juice. Cover with an air tight lid and let the jar sit in a dark place
    > > for a few days.

    >
    > > If you want to enjoy these pickled lemons, they are best when you eat
    > > them with some cooked sabanekh Ala Egyptian way.

    >
    > > hope this helps.

    >
    > Hmm. *Shata is an Egyptian hot sauce. *Black seeds? *Would that be
    > black cumin?
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    looked a little further and found this:

    Lamoun Makbouss
    (Pickled Lemons)
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A delicacy which is also magnificent made with fresh limes.

    Scrub lemons well and slice them. Sprinkle the slices generously with
    salt and leave for at least 24 hours on a large plate set at an angle,
    or in a colander. They will become soft and limp, and lose their
    bitterness. Arrange the slices in layers in a glass jar, sprinkling a
    little paprika between each layer. Cover with corn or nut oil.
    Sometimes olive oil is used, but its taste is rather strong and may
    slightly overpower the lemons.

    Close the jar tightly. After about 3 weeks the lemons should be ready
    to eat - soft, mellow, and a beautiful orange color.

    From "A Book of Middle Eastern Food" by Claudia Roden


  6. #6
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?



    "Jean B." wrote:
    >
    > ImStillMags wrote:
    > > On Jan 24, 12:15 pm, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.nospam.edu> wrote:
    > >> Anyone got a recipe? (Yes, I already googled it and found
    > >> a few.)
    > >>
    > >> My sister is looking for either the recipe or somewhere to
    > >> buy online (she lives in Montana so not likely to find a
    > >> store that sells Egyptian groceries).
    > >>
    > >> She says they're quite different than Moroccan preserved
    > >> lemons. Not nearly as salty for one thing. And they are
    > >> use more as a condiment than just for cooking with like
    > >> the Moroccan ones.
    > >>
    > >> I just wondered if anyone here has any knowledge of the
    > >> Egyptian style of preserved/pickled lemons.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks,
    > >> Kate
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Kate Connally
    > >> “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    > >> Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    > >> Until you bite their heads off.”
    > >> What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    > >> mailto:conna...@pitt.edu

    > >
    > > found this
    > >
    > > http://members.cox.net/ahmedheissa/reclemon.htm
    > >
    > >
    > > http://books.google.com/books?id=C7E...page&q&f=false
    > >
    > > and this:
    > >
    > > moon Mokhalel (Pickled Lemons or Limes)
    > >
    > > Combined Ingredients and Instructions:
    > > Wash the lemons very good, put them in a pot with some water and boil
    > > them for 1-2 minutes. Remove the lemons from the boiling water
    > > immediately.
    > >
    > > Mix together the salt, saffron, black seeds, and finally some good
    > > shata. When the lemons have cooled down a bit prick each one with your
    > > finger or a knife and put some of the mixture into each one and
    > > arrange the stuffed lemons in a jar. Make layers of stuffed lemons and
    > > sprinkle each layer with a bit of the mixture.
    > >
    > > When you have finished with all the lemons that are to be pickled,
    > > fill 1/2 the jar with olive oil or vegetable oil the other 1/2 with
    > > lemon juice ( use only fresh lemon juice) you can peal the lemons like
    > > oranges, split them in half and remove the seeds, and then put them in
    > > the food processor and pure, you can add some Jalapeneos that have
    > > been slashed slightly to pickle with the lemons and to add a bit of
    > > zest to them.
    > >
    > > At the top of the jar put some oil to seal the top and pack in some
    > > regular lemon halves to force the pickled lemons at below the oil and
    > > juice. Cover with an air tight lid and let the jar sit in a dark place
    > > for a few days.
    > >
    > > If you want to enjoy these pickled lemons, they are best when you eat
    > > them with some cooked sabanekh Ala Egyptian way.
    > >
    > >
    > > hope this helps.

    >
    > Hmm. Shata is an Egyptian hot sauce. Black seeds? Would that be
    > black cumin?
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.


    Or nigella/kalonji, which is not black cumin.

  7. #7
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    Arri London wrote:
    >
    > "Jean B." wrote:
    >> ImStillMags wrote:
    >>> On Jan 24, 12:15 pm, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.nospam.edu> wrote:
    >>>> Anyone got a recipe? (Yes, I already googled it and found
    >>>> a few.)
    >>>>
    >>>> My sister is looking for either the recipe or somewhere to
    >>>> buy online (she lives in Montana so not likely to find a
    >>>> store that sells Egyptian groceries).
    >>>>
    >>>> She says they're quite different than Moroccan preserved
    >>>> lemons. Not nearly as salty for one thing. And they are
    >>>> use more as a condiment than just for cooking with like
    >>>> the Moroccan ones.
    >>>>
    >>>> I just wondered if anyone here has any knowledge of the
    >>>> Egyptian style of preserved/pickled lemons.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks,
    >>>> Kate
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Kate Connally
    >>>> “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    >>>> Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    >>>> Until you bite their heads off.”
    >>>> What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    >>>> mailto:conna...@pitt.edu
    >>> found this
    >>>
    >>> http://members.cox.net/ahmedheissa/reclemon.htm
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> http://books.google.com/books?id=C7E...page&q&f=false
    >>>
    >>> and this:
    >>>
    >>> moon Mokhalel (Pickled Lemons or Limes)
    >>>
    >>> Combined Ingredients and Instructions:
    >>> Wash the lemons very good, put them in a pot with some water and boil
    >>> them for 1-2 minutes. Remove the lemons from the boiling water
    >>> immediately.
    >>>
    >>> Mix together the salt, saffron, black seeds, and finally some good
    >>> shata. When the lemons have cooled down a bit prick each one with your
    >>> finger or a knife and put some of the mixture into each one and
    >>> arrange the stuffed lemons in a jar. Make layers of stuffed lemons and
    >>> sprinkle each layer with a bit of the mixture.
    >>>
    >>> When you have finished with all the lemons that are to be pickled,
    >>> fill 1/2 the jar with olive oil or vegetable oil the other 1/2 with
    >>> lemon juice ( use only fresh lemon juice) you can peal the lemons like
    >>> oranges, split them in half and remove the seeds, and then put them in
    >>> the food processor and pure, you can add some Jalapeneos that have
    >>> been slashed slightly to pickle with the lemons and to add a bit of
    >>> zest to them.
    >>>
    >>> At the top of the jar put some oil to seal the top and pack in some
    >>> regular lemon halves to force the pickled lemons at below the oil and
    >>> juice. Cover with an air tight lid and let the jar sit in a dark place
    >>> for a few days.
    >>>
    >>> If you want to enjoy these pickled lemons, they are best when you eat
    >>> them with some cooked sabanekh Ala Egyptian way.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> hope this helps.

    >> Hmm. Shata is an Egyptian hot sauce. Black seeds? Would that be
    >> black cumin?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jean B.

    >
    > Or nigella/kalonji, which is not black cumin.


    Well, we need to differentiate.

    Yes, I know kalonji, and that was my first thought. (Learned
    about them many years ago thanks to Daramjit Singh, who gave me my
    first taste and recipes for real Indian cookery.)

    --
    Jean B.

  8. #8
    dodymike Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?


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  9. #9
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > moon Mokhalel (Pickled Lemons or Limes)


    Did you cut off the first part? I'd think it should be transcribed
    _Lemoon_ or _Laimoon_.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Shata is an Egyptian hot sauce


    Shata just means hot sauce in Arabic - it's not a particular kind.
    It's kind of like having a spiced tea served in the east, asking what it
    is called and then calling spiced tea chai tea. Chai is tea. It can be
    spiced and served with milk. Chai tea is tea tea.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  11. #11
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > In article <8q6em5F4ruU1@mid.individual.ne[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Shata is an Egyptian hot sauce

    >
    > Shata just means hot sauce in Arabic - it's not a particular kind.
    > It's kind of like having a spiced tea served in the east, asking what it
    > is called and then calling spiced tea chai tea. Chai is tea. It can be
    > spiced and served with milk. Chai tea is tea tea.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee @ Arabian Knits
    >
    > "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13
    >
    > http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/


    Heh. So, can one use Tabasco, or???

    --
    Jean B.

  12. #12
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> Shata is an Egyptian hot sauce

    > >
    > > Shata just means hot sauce in Arabic - it's not a particular kind.
    > > It's kind of like having a spiced tea served in the east, asking what it
    > > is called and then calling spiced tea chai tea. Chai is tea. It can be
    > > spiced and served with milk. Chai tea is tea tea.

    >
    > Heh. So, can one use Tabasco, or???


    Yes. Now, they may well have a particular type that is more common
    there or that is preferred, that would be common knowledge to folks
    there, but any hot sauce you like will work. :-)

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    ImStillMags wrote:
    > On Jan 24, 12:15 pm, Kate Connally<conna...@pitt.nospam.edu> wrote:
    >> Anyone got a recipe? (Yes, I already googled it and found
    >> a few.)
    >>
    >> My sister is looking for either the recipe or somewhere to
    >> buy online (she lives in Montana so not likely to find a
    >> store that sells Egyptian groceries).
    >>
    >> She says they're quite different than Moroccan preserved
    >> lemons. Not nearly as salty for one thing. And they are
    >> use more as a condiment than just for cooking with like
    >> the Moroccan ones.
    >>
    >> I just wondered if anyone here has any knowledge of the
    >> Egyptian style of preserved/pickled lemons.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >> Kate
    >>
    >> --
    >> Kate Connally
    >> “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    >> Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    >> Until you bite their heads off.”
    >> What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    >> mailto:conna...@pitt.edu

    >
    > found this
    >
    > http://members.cox.net/ahmedheissa/reclemon.htm
    >
    >
    > http://books.google.com/books?id=C7EvQKUQV9YC&pg=

    PA12&lpg=PA12&dq=egyptian+pickled/preserved+lemons&
    source=bl&ots=onug_HV3YB&sig=czjuBt3f4i5vKR1NtQnA-
    VL8RF4&hl=en&ei=du49TaezHJS0sAOZ8oWpAw&sa=X&oi=boo k_
    result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGYQ6AEwCQ#v=onepa ge&q&f=false
    >
    > and this:
    >
    > moon Mokhalel (Pickled Lemons or Limes)
    >
    > Combined Ingredients and Instructions:
    > Wash the lemons very good, put them in a pot with some water and boil
    > them for 1-2 minutes. Remove the lemons from the boiling water
    > immediately.
    >
    > Mix together the salt, saffron, black seeds, and finally some good
    > shata. When the lemons have cooled down a bit prick each one with your
    > finger or a knife and put some of the mixture into each one and
    > arrange the stuffed lemons in a jar. Make layers of stuffed lemons and
    > sprinkle each layer with a bit of the mixture.
    >
    > When you have finished with all the lemons that are to be pickled,
    > fill 1/2 the jar with olive oil or vegetable oil the other 1/2 with
    > lemon juice ( use only fresh lemon juice) you can peal the lemons like
    > oranges, split them in half and remove the seeds, and then put them in
    > the food processor and pure, you can add some Jalapeneos that have
    > been slashed slightly to pickle with the lemons and to add a bit of
    > zest to them.
    >
    > At the top of the jar put some oil to seal the top and pack in some
    > regular lemon halves to force the pickled lemons at below the oil and
    > juice. Cover with an air tight lid and let the jar sit in a dark place
    > for a few days.
    >
    > If you want to enjoy these pickled lemons, they are best when you eat
    > them with some cooked sabanekh Ala Egyptian way.
    >
    >
    > hope this helps.


    Thanks, but I already have this those.
    Kate
    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  14. #14
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    >>> In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Shata is an Egyptian hot sauce
    >>> Shata just means hot sauce in Arabic - it's not a particular kind.
    >>> It's kind of like having a spiced tea served in the east, asking what it
    >>> is called and then calling spiced tea chai tea. Chai is tea. It can be
    >>> spiced and served with milk. Chai tea is tea tea.

    >> Heh. So, can one use Tabasco, or???

    >
    > Yes. Now, they may well have a particular type that is more common
    > there or that is preferred, that would be common knowledge to folks
    > there, but any hot sauce you like will work. :-)
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee @ Arabian Knits
    >
    > "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13
    >
    > http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/


    More like harissa?

    --
    Jean B.

  15. #15
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Egyptian pickled or preserved lemons?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > >>> In article <[email protected]>, "Jean B." <[email protected]>
    > >>> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> Shata is an Egyptian hot sauce
    > >>> Shata just means hot sauce in Arabic - it's not a particular kind.
    > >>> It's kind of like having a spiced tea served in the east, asking what it
    > >>> is called and then calling spiced tea chai tea. Chai is tea. It can be
    > >>> spiced and served with milk. Chai tea is tea tea.
    > >> Heh. So, can one use Tabasco, or???

    > >
    > > Yes. Now, they may well have a particular type that is more common
    > > there or that is preferred, that would be common knowledge to folks
    > > there, but any hot sauce you like will work. :-)
    > >

    >
    > More like harissa?


    Probably, but I don't know for sure. My people are from Saudi
    Arabia, not Egypt. ;-)

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

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