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Thread: Eating Guavas

  1. #1
    Cyndi Guest

    Default Re: Eating Guavas

    On Oct 1, 9:58*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > I bought some ripe guavas today. *Nothing reminds me
    > of Hawaii like the aroma of guavas, so I bought some
    > for my mom. *I'd noticed the mearby Asian food store
    > started carrying them a few weeks ago, so I waited
    > until I saw them shortly after new stock had been put
    > out, so I could get some good ones.
    >
    > I must not have bought them before, because I didn't
    > remember anything about eating them. *I sliced one open.
    > It had a pulpy interior full of small seeds, about the
    > shape of sesame seeds but roughly twice as large. *And
    > maybe 10 times harder. *I scooped out the pulp and tried
    > the thin belt of flesh next to the skin. *That was okay,
    > but it lacked the wonderful flavor of the custardy pulp.
    >
    > I asked my mom how she ate them. *Growing up on Kauai,
    > her family had a guava tree. *She said they'd just bite
    > into them and eat them seeds and all.
    >
    > I didn't feel like doing that. *I got the idea of pushing
    > the pulp through a strainer. *I took a half guava and
    > rubbed it against the strainer. *The guava was so ripe
    > that most of it except the seeds and some skin easily
    > went through. *I collected the strained pulp in a bowl
    > and scraped it off the strainer. *That was really good
    > stuff! *I only kept a few guavas and gave the rest to mom.
    > If she doesn't eat them all right away, I might pick up
    > a few more the next time I'm over there.
    >
    > I don't have any good ideas what to do with them, other
    > than eating the strained pulp out of a bowl with a spoon.
    > I think with an item like this, you really don't want to
    > dilute the flavor with ice cream or something, or layer
    > on other flavors like cinnamon. *But I could be wrong
    > about that. *In its pure form, guava has just the right
    > sweetness and lots of aroma and flavor -- I just don't
    > see tampering with that.


    Hi,

    I grew up in Florida and our neighbor had a tree. We, like your mom,
    ate the whole thing. As for the puree you made, you could make a
    pie. Seems to me, a while back, I saw a package of guava puree for
    sale and I want to say it had a pie recipe on the back...

    Sorry, I know that's not much help.

  2. #2
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: Eating Guavas

    On 10/1/2011 3:58 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > I bought some ripe guavas today. Nothing reminds me
    > of Hawaii like the aroma of guavas, so I bought some
    > for my mom. I'd noticed the mearby Asian food store
    > started carrying them a few weeks ago, so I waited
    > until I saw them shortly after new stock had been put
    > out, so I could get some good ones.
    >
    > I must not have bought them before, because I didn't
    > remember anything about eating them. I sliced one open.
    > It had a pulpy interior full of small seeds, about the
    > shape of sesame seeds but roughly twice as large. And
    > maybe 10 times harder. I scooped out the pulp and tried
    > the thin belt of flesh next to the skin. That was okay,
    > but it lacked the wonderful flavor of the custardy pulp.
    >
    > I asked my mom how she ate them. Growing up on Kauai,
    > her family had a guava tree. She said they'd just bite
    > into them and eat them seeds and all.
    >
    > I didn't feel like doing that. I got the idea of pushing
    > the pulp through a strainer. I took a half guava and
    > rubbed it against the strainer. The guava was so ripe
    > that most of it except the seeds and some skin easily
    > went through. I collected the strained pulp in a bowl
    > and scraped it off the strainer. That was really good
    > stuff! I only kept a few guavas and gave the rest to mom.
    > If she doesn't eat them all right away, I might pick up
    > a few more the next time I'm over there.
    >
    > I don't have any good ideas what to do with them, other
    > than eating the strained pulp out of a bowl with a spoon.
    > I think with an item like this, you really don't want to
    > dilute the flavor with ice cream or something, or layer
    > on other flavors like cinnamon. But I could be wrong
    > about that. In its pure form, guava has just the right
    > sweetness and lots of aroma and flavor -- I just don't
    > see tampering with that.


    Most of the old folks over here will cook the guava and then strain the
    juice out of it to make juice or jelly. One of my clients gave me a jar
    of guava pulp. She said to dilute it with water and drink it. It was
    good. I wish she would make some more for me. :-) I don't think the
    younger generation will mess with these fruits these days. They probably
    rather have Sunny Delight. :-)

    I was looking at a house for sale about a month ago and there was a tree
    with a lot of small red fruit. My friend said it was a strawberry guava
    tree and that the fruits were tasty. He was right - it was sweet and
    tart which was a surprise since regular guava are too sour for me.
    Anyway you just eat the outer flesh and throw away the inner seeds.

    The strawberry guava is considered to be a pest in Hawaii because they
    grow so fast and there are programs to eradicate the plant. Tasty though...

  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Eating Guavas

    I bought some ripe guavas today. Nothing reminds me
    of Hawaii like the aroma of guavas, so I bought some
    for my mom. I'd noticed the mearby Asian food store
    started carrying them a few weeks ago, so I waited
    until I saw them shortly after new stock had been put
    out, so I could get some good ones.

    I must not have bought them before, because I didn't
    remember anything about eating them. I sliced one open.
    It had a pulpy interior full of small seeds, about the
    shape of sesame seeds but roughly twice as large. And
    maybe 10 times harder. I scooped out the pulp and tried
    the thin belt of flesh next to the skin. That was okay,
    but it lacked the wonderful flavor of the custardy pulp.

    I asked my mom how she ate them. Growing up on Kauai,
    her family had a guava tree. She said they'd just bite
    into them and eat them seeds and all.

    I didn't feel like doing that. I got the idea of pushing
    the pulp through a strainer. I took a half guava and
    rubbed it against the strainer. The guava was so ripe
    that most of it except the seeds and some skin easily
    went through. I collected the strained pulp in a bowl
    and scraped it off the strainer. That was really good
    stuff! I only kept a few guavas and gave the rest to mom.
    If she doesn't eat them all right away, I might pick up
    a few more the next time I'm over there.

    I don't have any good ideas what to do with them, other
    than eating the strained pulp out of a bowl with a spoon.
    I think with an item like this, you really don't want to
    dilute the flavor with ice cream or something, or layer
    on other flavors like cinnamon. But I could be wrong
    about that. In its pure form, guava has just the right
    sweetness and lots of aroma and flavor -- I just don't
    see tampering with that.

  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Eating Guavas

    Cyndi wrote:
    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > I grew up in Florida and our neighbor had a tree. We, like your mom,
    > ate the whole thing. As for the puree you made, you could make a
    > pie. Seems to me, a while back, I saw a package of guava puree for
    > sale and I want to say it had a pie recipe on the back...
    >
    > Sorry, I know that's not much help.


    Steal guavas, did you? Mom said there was a Filipino
    family next door with 12 or 13 kids, and when the guavas
    were ripe and their mom took a nap, the kids would come
    steal the guavas. And their mom would swear her kids
    would never do anything like that.

    I would think a pie would lose the fine guava aroma
    during baking. I'm not going to find out because I
    haven't baked anything since the oven broke 30 years ago.
    I suppose that's a reasonable idea. I was thinking more
    along the lines of a parfait, but I'm unlikely to do that
    either. Hmmm . . . I though a parfait was made with
    whipped Jell-O, but Wikipedia says there's two types,
    neither of which uses whipped Jell-O. Their description
    of French parfait sounds even better than what I was
    thinking about -- I might even try that one.

    So what is the thing made from whipped Jell-O? I thought
    "chiffon" might be it, but no, Wikipedia says that's a
    type of cake. Cake! Not a molecule of Jell-O in it.

  5. #5
    pure kona Guest

    Default Re: Eating Guavas

    On Sat, 01 Oct 2011 17:58:26 -0800, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I bought some ripe guavas today. Nothing reminds me
    >of Hawaii like the aroma of guavas, so I bought some

    snipped.....

    Mark,

    Here is a guava jelly recipe from the well loved island cook- Maili
    Yardley' cook book. Maili was a family friend and I thought she was
    very nice as were her kids.

    It may amuse your mother to remember that this is how Guava Jelly was
    made in Hawaii.

    aloha,
    Cea
    **************.

    by Maili Yardley

    GUAVA JELLY TIPS
    Remember to pick both half-ripe and green guavas along with the ripe,
    too, so the pectin content will be high.
    Add a dab of butter to the cooking jelly so it won't scum.
    The jelly is done when 2 or 3 drops run together and sheet to form one
    big blob off the spoon.
    If guava jelly doesn't jell, store it separately and use to mix with
    ice cream, dribble over baked or fried bananas, or for pancakes! Don't
    fret, it happens to the experts too, and there are varieties of guavas
    that never do jell!

    BASIC GUAVA JELLY
    Basic Guava Jelly: Simmer chopped guavas in large pot and add just
    enough water to come just below the top of the fruit. Cook until
    mushy and well done.
    Pour into special bags made of netting or regular strainers and let
    drip for liquid. The bags make a clearer liquid for jelly. Save the
    pulp for jam.
    Measure cup of juice for C of sugar and do not cook more than 3 C at a
    time. Bring to a good rolling boil but watch it so it doesn't
    overflow.
    Add the dab of butter, keep at rolling boil, and skim off whatever
    scum appears. The shorter the cooking, the quicker the evaporation
    and clearer the jelly.
    Jar when it sheets off the spoon.

    Put the guava pulp through a sieve or food mill for puree to make jam.
    If you like tart jam, combine 1 C puree with three quarters C sugar
    and add a splash of lemon juice. Otherwise combine 1 C pulp and 1 C
    sugar.
    The optional additions are: lemon juice, dash of cinnamon, nutmeg,
    cloves, grated or powdered ginger and allspice.
    Bring the mixture to a boil, turn down to low, cover the pot and let
    it cook slowly so it doesn't burn the bottom of the pot. Stir
    frequently and it is ready when it thickens and sheets from the spoon.


  6. #6
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Eating Guavas

    dsi1 wrote:

    > The strawberry guava is considered to be a pest in Hawaii because they
    > grow so fast and there are programs to eradicate the plant. Tasty
    > though...


    Their wood is quite hard; it's no easy feat to cut up a guava tree by hand.

    Bob



  7. #7
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Eating Guavas

    Mark wrote:

    > I bought some ripe guavas today. Nothing reminds me
    > of Hawaii like the aroma of guavas, so I bought some
    > for my mom. I'd noticed the mearby Asian food store
    > started carrying them a few weeks ago, so I waited
    > until I saw them shortly after new stock had been put
    > out, so I could get some good ones.
    >
    > I must not have bought them before, because I didn't
    > remember anything about eating them. I sliced one open.
    > It had a pulpy interior full of small seeds, about the
    > shape of sesame seeds but roughly twice as large. And
    > maybe 10 times harder. I scooped out the pulp and tried
    > the thin belt of flesh next to the skin. That was okay,
    > but it lacked the wonderful flavor of the custardy pulp.
    >
    > I asked my mom how she ate them. Growing up on Kauai,
    > her family had a guava tree. She said they'd just bite
    > into them and eat them seeds and all.
    >
    > I didn't feel like doing that. I got the idea of pushing
    > the pulp through a strainer. I took a half guava and
    > rubbed it against the strainer. The guava was so ripe
    > that most of it except the seeds and some skin easily
    > went through. I collected the strained pulp in a bowl
    > and scraped it off the strainer. That was really good
    > stuff! I only kept a few guavas and gave the rest to mom.
    > If she doesn't eat them all right away, I might pick up
    > a few more the next time I'm over there.
    >
    > I don't have any good ideas what to do with them, other
    > than eating the strained pulp out of a bowl with a spoon.
    > I think with an item like this, you really don't want to
    > dilute the flavor with ice cream or something, or layer
    > on other flavors like cinnamon. But I could be wrong
    > about that. In its pure form, guava has just the right
    > sweetness and lots of aroma and flavor -- I just don't
    > see tampering with that.


    It's a nice thing to put into of some kind of meringue dessert, like
    pavlova, floating islands, or meringue shells. Cherimoya pulp has similar
    qualities, but isn't as pretty with the meringue as guava.

    Bob



  8. #8
    chizcurlz Guest

    Default Re: Eating Guavas


    Eating Guava brings a lot of health benefits such as Vitamin A,B and C,
    Calcium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Iron, Fiber and Folic Acid as well.




    --
    chizcurlz

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