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Thread: Eating after dental work...

  1. #1
    Nexis Guest

    Default Eating after dental work...

    is a strange experience!
    I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone density, and
    said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to numb. So, after seeing in my
    chart that the last attempt at fixing this tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and
    lots of throwing up, he tried something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't
    tell me until after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me,
    for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the day! Luckily,
    I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)


    kimberly


  2. #2
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    On May 17, 12:34*am, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    > is a strange experience!
    > I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone density, and
    > said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to numb. So, after seeing in my
    > chart that the last attempt at fixing this tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and
    > lots of throwing up, he tried something new. I think it's called Marcaine?He didn't
    > tell me until after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me,
    > for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the day! Luckily,
    > I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >
    > kimberly

    ==================================

    Never, never let them numb both sides at the same time.
    All you do for the next several meals is drool.

    Lynn in Fargo
    Needing a boatload of dental work and not trusting any dentist who
    takes Medical Assistance (Medicaid)

  3. #3
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    On May 17, 12:34*am, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    > is a strange experience!
    > I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone density, and
    > said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to numb. So, after seeing in my
    > chart that the last attempt at fixing this tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and
    > lots of throwing up, he tried something new. I think it's called Marcaine?He didn't
    > tell me until after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me,
    > for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the day! Luckily,
    > I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >
    > kimberly

    ==================================

    Never, never let them numb both sides at the same time.
    All you do for the next several meals is drool.

    Lynn in Fargo
    Needing a boatload of dental work and not trusting any dentist who
    takes Medical Assistance (Medicaid)

  4. #4
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    On Fri 16 May 2008 10:34:49p, Nexis told us...

    > is a strange experience!
    > I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone
    > density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to
    > numb. So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt at fixing this
    > tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of throwing up, he tried
    > something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't tell me until
    > after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me,
    > for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the
    > day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >
    >
    > kimberly
    >


    Coincidentally, a week ago I went to the dentist with a very painful tooth,
    to learn that it was a very bad abscess. I've been taking an anti-
    infective drug since then and Percoset as needed for pain. I went this
    morning to have the tooth extracted. The dentist remarked, from looking at
    the x-ray, that he had seldom seen anyone with teeth that had such long
    roots. Just what I wanted to hear. :-( In any event, he may have used
    that same local anesthetic on me, because it remained numb far longer than
    anything else I'd experienced before. Boy, when that finally wore off
    tonight I thought I'd hit the ceiling with pain, so took a dose of
    Percoset, which has helped somewhat. I *wish* I was still numb! :-)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Saturday, 05(V)/17(XVII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Armed Forces Day
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 1dys 23hrs
    -------------------------------------------
    Addams Family Thing dies - Wrists in Peace.
    -------------------------------------------


  5. #5
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    On Fri 16 May 2008 10:34:49p, Nexis told us...

    > is a strange experience!
    > I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone
    > density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to
    > numb. So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt at fixing this
    > tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of throwing up, he tried
    > something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't tell me until
    > after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me,
    > for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the
    > day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >
    >
    > kimberly
    >


    Coincidentally, a week ago I went to the dentist with a very painful tooth,
    to learn that it was a very bad abscess. I've been taking an anti-
    infective drug since then and Percoset as needed for pain. I went this
    morning to have the tooth extracted. The dentist remarked, from looking at
    the x-ray, that he had seldom seen anyone with teeth that had such long
    roots. Just what I wanted to hear. :-( In any event, he may have used
    that same local anesthetic on me, because it remained numb far longer than
    anything else I'd experienced before. Boy, when that finally wore off
    tonight I thought I'd hit the ceiling with pain, so took a dose of
    Percoset, which has helped somewhat. I *wish* I was still numb! :-)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Saturday, 05(V)/17(XVII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Armed Forces Day
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 1dys 23hrs
    -------------------------------------------
    Addams Family Thing dies - Wrists in Peace.
    -------------------------------------------


  6. #6
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    Best to just not eat. You can easily bite your tongue or cheek and cause
    some real damage. 8 hours without food is just not a big deal. If you just
    can't stand it, some fruit juices or soup would be fine. I just had a crown
    put on and they had to pump me full of 3 times the normal novacain dose at
    both sittings. I just waited until later that night to eat.

    Paul

    "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:18uXj.47269$[email protected]..
    > is a strange experience!
    > I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone
    > density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to numb.
    > So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt at fixing this tooth
    > resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of throwing up, he tried
    > something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't tell me until after
    > the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me, for which
    > I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the day! Luckily,
    > I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >
    >
    > kimberly




  7. #7
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    Best to just not eat. You can easily bite your tongue or cheek and cause
    some real damage. 8 hours without food is just not a big deal. If you just
    can't stand it, some fruit juices or soup would be fine. I just had a crown
    put on and they had to pump me full of 3 times the normal novacain dose at
    both sittings. I just waited until later that night to eat.

    Paul

    "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:18uXj.47269$[email protected]..
    > is a strange experience!
    > I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone
    > density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to numb.
    > So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt at fixing this tooth
    > resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of throwing up, he tried
    > something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't tell me until after
    > the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me, for which
    > I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the day! Luckily,
    > I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >
    >
    > kimberly




  8. #8
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 184...
    > On Fri 16 May 2008 10:34:49p, Nexis told us...
    >
    >> is a strange experience!
    >> I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone
    >> density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to
    >> numb. So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt at fixing this
    >> tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of throwing up, he tried
    >> something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't tell me until
    >> after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me,
    >> for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the
    >> day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >>
    >>
    >> kimberly
    >>

    >
    > Coincidentally, a week ago I went to the dentist with a very painful tooth,
    > to learn that it was a very bad abscess. I've been taking an anti-
    > infective drug since then and Percoset as needed for pain. I went this
    > morning to have the tooth extracted. The dentist remarked, from looking at
    > the x-ray, that he had seldom seen anyone with teeth that had such long
    > roots. Just what I wanted to hear. :-( In any event, he may have used
    > that same local anesthetic on me, because it remained numb far longer than
    > anything else I'd experienced before. Boy, when that finally wore off
    > tonight I thought I'd hit the ceiling with pain, so took a dose of
    > Percoset, which has helped somewhat. I *wish* I was still numb! :-)
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright
    > -------------------------------------------



    Oh, Wayne, you have my sympathies! Abscesses suck, big time.
    I have problem teeth because when I was pregnant, I had hyperemesis
    which is just a nice way of saying I threw up all the time...morning, noon, and
    night.
    Because of all the acid washing over my teeth, and in spite of constant brushing as
    much as I could stand, I lost some of the enamel, which makes me really prone to
    cavities and breakage.
    It's 1:23 am, and I was at the dentist at 10 am...and the numb is just starting to
    wear
    off now! I took a motrin/tylenol combo for the pain, which is more in my jaw than
    anything else. That was the longest I have ever been numb! lol

    kimberly


  9. #9
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 184...
    > On Fri 16 May 2008 10:34:49p, Nexis told us...
    >
    >> is a strange experience!
    >> I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone
    >> density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to
    >> numb. So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt at fixing this
    >> tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of throwing up, he tried
    >> something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't tell me until
    >> after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me,
    >> for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the
    >> day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >>
    >>
    >> kimberly
    >>

    >
    > Coincidentally, a week ago I went to the dentist with a very painful tooth,
    > to learn that it was a very bad abscess. I've been taking an anti-
    > infective drug since then and Percoset as needed for pain. I went this
    > morning to have the tooth extracted. The dentist remarked, from looking at
    > the x-ray, that he had seldom seen anyone with teeth that had such long
    > roots. Just what I wanted to hear. :-( In any event, he may have used
    > that same local anesthetic on me, because it remained numb far longer than
    > anything else I'd experienced before. Boy, when that finally wore off
    > tonight I thought I'd hit the ceiling with pain, so took a dose of
    > Percoset, which has helped somewhat. I *wish* I was still numb! :-)
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright
    > -------------------------------------------



    Oh, Wayne, you have my sympathies! Abscesses suck, big time.
    I have problem teeth because when I was pregnant, I had hyperemesis
    which is just a nice way of saying I threw up all the time...morning, noon, and
    night.
    Because of all the acid washing over my teeth, and in spite of constant brushing as
    much as I could stand, I lost some of the enamel, which makes me really prone to
    cavities and breakage.
    It's 1:23 am, and I was at the dentist at 10 am...and the numb is just starting to
    wear
    off now! I took a motrin/tylenol combo for the pain, which is more in my jaw than
    anything else. That was the longest I have ever been numb! lol

    kimberly


  10. #10
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...


    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:hvwXj.5107$4K5.149@trnddc03...
    > Best to just not eat. You can easily bite your tongue or cheek and cause some real
    > damage. 8 hours without food is just not a big deal. If you just can't stand it,
    > some fruit juices or soup would be fine. I just had a crown put on and they had to
    > pump me full of 3 times the normal novacain dose at both sittings. I just waited
    > until later that night to eat.
    >
    > Paul


    The numbing was pretty localized to my upper lip and the gums around 3 teeth, so
    I wasn't too worried about biting my tongue or cheek. Not eating would be ok for
    most folks, I think, but being diabetic, it's not terribly good for me. I did stick
    with
    easy to eat foods...but the not feeling my upper lip thing was just odd! :-) It was
    especially so when drinking out of a straw because it was hard to tell if I really
    had it
    in my mouth- lol.

    kimberly




    >
    > "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:18uXj.47269$[email protected]..
    >> is a strange experience!
    >> I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone density,
    >> and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to numb. So, after seeing
    >> in my chart that the last attempt at fixing this tooth resulted in 5 shots of
    >> Novocain and lots of throwing up, he tried something new. I think it's called
    >> Marcaine? He didn't tell me until after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more
    >> hours! It did numb me, for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the
    >> rest of the day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >>
    >>
    >> kimberly

    >
    >



  11. #11
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...


    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:hvwXj.5107$4K5.149@trnddc03...
    > Best to just not eat. You can easily bite your tongue or cheek and cause some real
    > damage. 8 hours without food is just not a big deal. If you just can't stand it,
    > some fruit juices or soup would be fine. I just had a crown put on and they had to
    > pump me full of 3 times the normal novacain dose at both sittings. I just waited
    > until later that night to eat.
    >
    > Paul


    The numbing was pretty localized to my upper lip and the gums around 3 teeth, so
    I wasn't too worried about biting my tongue or cheek. Not eating would be ok for
    most folks, I think, but being diabetic, it's not terribly good for me. I did stick
    with
    easy to eat foods...but the not feeling my upper lip thing was just odd! :-) It was
    especially so when drinking out of a straw because it was hard to tell if I really
    had it
    in my mouth- lol.

    kimberly




    >
    > "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:18uXj.47269$[email protected]..
    >> is a strange experience!
    >> I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone density,
    >> and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to numb. So, after seeing
    >> in my chart that the last attempt at fixing this tooth resulted in 5 shots of
    >> Novocain and lots of throwing up, he tried something new. I think it's called
    >> Marcaine? He didn't tell me until after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more
    >> hours! It did numb me, for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the
    >> rest of the day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >>
    >>
    >> kimberly

    >
    >



  12. #12
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...


    "Lynn from Fargo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On May 17, 12:34 am, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    <snip>

    >Never, never let them numb both sides at the same time.
    >All you do for the next several meals is drool.


    >Lynn in Fargo
    >Needing a boatload of dental work and not trusting any dentist who
    >takes Medical Assistance (Medicaid)


    LOL! Thankfully, they only numbed the front, so I didn't drool too much! ;-)

    It's wearing off now, I can feel my nose again :-)

    kimberly


  13. #13
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...


    "Lynn from Fargo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:8a453d4b-30f3-4645-b1ab-f1[email protected]..
    On May 17, 12:34 am, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    <snip>

    >Never, never let them numb both sides at the same time.
    >All you do for the next several meals is drool.


    >Lynn in Fargo
    >Needing a boatload of dental work and not trusting any dentist who
    >takes Medical Assistance (Medicaid)


    LOL! Thankfully, they only numbed the front, so I didn't drool too much! ;-)

    It's wearing off now, I can feel my nose again :-)

    kimberly


  14. #14
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    On Sat 17 May 2008 01:25:41a, Nexis told us...

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 184...
    >> On Fri 16 May 2008 10:34:49p, Nexis told us...
    >>
    >>> is a strange experience!
    >>> I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with
    >>> bone density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder
    >>> to numb. So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt at fixing
    >>> this tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of throwing up, he
    >>> tried something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't tell me
    >>> until after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did
    >>> numb me, for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the
    >>> rest of the day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no
    >>> pain ;-)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> kimberly
    >>>

    >>
    >> Coincidentally, a week ago I went to the dentist with a very painful
    >> tooth, to learn that it was a very bad abscess. I've been taking an
    >> anti- infective drug since then and Percoset as needed for pain. I
    >> went this morning to have the tooth extracted. The dentist remarked,
    >> from looking at the x-ray, that he had seldom seen anyone with teeth
    >> that had such long roots. Just what I wanted to hear. :-( In any
    >> event, he may have used that same local anesthetic on me, because it
    >> remained numb far longer than anything else I'd experienced before.
    >> Boy, when that finally wore off tonight I thought I'd hit the ceiling
    >> with pain, so took a dose of Percoset, which has helped somewhat. I
    >> *wish* I was still numb! :-)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright
    >> -------------------------------------------

    >
    >
    > Oh, Wayne, you have my sympathies! Abscesses suck, big time.
    > I have problem teeth because when I was pregnant, I had hyperemesis
    > which is just a nice way of saying I threw up all the time...morning,
    > noon, and night.
    > Because of all the acid washing over my teeth, and in spite of constant
    > brushing as much as I could stand, I lost some of the enamel, which
    > makes me really prone to cavities and breakage.
    > It's 1:23 am, and I was at the dentist at 10 am...and the numb is just
    > starting to wear
    > off now! I took a motrin/tylenol combo for the pain, which is more in my
    > jaw than anything else. That was the longest I have ever been numb! lol
    >
    > kimberly


    Thanks, Kimberly. I can really appreciate the problem with lost enamel,
    too, although I wasn't pregnant and throwing up. :-) For an unknown
    reason, I lost most of the enamel on my lower front four teeth years ago.
    They became so sensitive I could barely stand to eat, or extremes of either
    hot or cold. I didn't have cavities in them or any breakage, but the
    dentist said the only solution was to put crowns on them. I haven't had
    any problems since then, but I do have some other dental problems that I'm
    not looking forward to resolving. There always seems to be pain involved.

    I can't substantiate this, but I read somewhere years ago that dentists, as
    a category of occupation, have the highest incidence of suicide, presumably
    because of how they patients feel about going to the dentist, and that they
    are frequently causing pain. It sounds a bit far-fetched, but not totally
    implausible.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Saturday, 05(V)/17(XVII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Armed Forces Day
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 1dys 22hrs 35mins
    -------------------------------------------
    Definition of Terror: A female Klingon
    having a bad hair day.
    -------------------------------------------

  15. #15
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    On Sat 17 May 2008 01:25:41a, Nexis told us...

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 184...
    >> On Fri 16 May 2008 10:34:49p, Nexis told us...
    >>
    >>> is a strange experience!
    >>> I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with
    >>> bone density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder
    >>> to numb. So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt at fixing
    >>> this tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of throwing up, he
    >>> tried something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't tell me
    >>> until after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did
    >>> numb me, for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the
    >>> rest of the day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no
    >>> pain ;-)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> kimberly
    >>>

    >>
    >> Coincidentally, a week ago I went to the dentist with a very painful
    >> tooth, to learn that it was a very bad abscess. I've been taking an
    >> anti- infective drug since then and Percoset as needed for pain. I
    >> went this morning to have the tooth extracted. The dentist remarked,
    >> from looking at the x-ray, that he had seldom seen anyone with teeth
    >> that had such long roots. Just what I wanted to hear. :-( In any
    >> event, he may have used that same local anesthetic on me, because it
    >> remained numb far longer than anything else I'd experienced before.
    >> Boy, when that finally wore off tonight I thought I'd hit the ceiling
    >> with pain, so took a dose of Percoset, which has helped somewhat. I
    >> *wish* I was still numb! :-)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright
    >> -------------------------------------------

    >
    >
    > Oh, Wayne, you have my sympathies! Abscesses suck, big time.
    > I have problem teeth because when I was pregnant, I had hyperemesis
    > which is just a nice way of saying I threw up all the time...morning,
    > noon, and night.
    > Because of all the acid washing over my teeth, and in spite of constant
    > brushing as much as I could stand, I lost some of the enamel, which
    > makes me really prone to cavities and breakage.
    > It's 1:23 am, and I was at the dentist at 10 am...and the numb is just
    > starting to wear
    > off now! I took a motrin/tylenol combo for the pain, which is more in my
    > jaw than anything else. That was the longest I have ever been numb! lol
    >
    > kimberly


    Thanks, Kimberly. I can really appreciate the problem with lost enamel,
    too, although I wasn't pregnant and throwing up. :-) For an unknown
    reason, I lost most of the enamel on my lower front four teeth years ago.
    They became so sensitive I could barely stand to eat, or extremes of either
    hot or cold. I didn't have cavities in them or any breakage, but the
    dentist said the only solution was to put crowns on them. I haven't had
    any problems since then, but I do have some other dental problems that I'm
    not looking forward to resolving. There always seems to be pain involved.

    I can't substantiate this, but I read somewhere years ago that dentists, as
    a category of occupation, have the highest incidence of suicide, presumably
    because of how they patients feel about going to the dentist, and that they
    are frequently causing pain. It sounds a bit far-fetched, but not totally
    implausible.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Saturday, 05(V)/17(XVII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Armed Forces Day
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 1dys 22hrs 35mins
    -------------------------------------------
    Definition of Terror: A female Klingon
    having a bad hair day.
    -------------------------------------------

  16. #16
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    After my extraction today, I've had nothing but liquids; cream soups,
    milkshakes, plain ice cream, etc. I'll probably continue that for a couple
    of days, mainly because I'm paranoid about getting any particles of food in
    the cavity left by the extraction.

    Wayne

    On Sat 17 May 2008 01:16:13a, Paul M. Cook told us...

    > Best to just not eat. You can easily bite your tongue or cheek and
    > cause some real damage. 8 hours without food is just not a big deal.
    > If you just can't stand it, some fruit juices or soup would be fine. I
    > just had a crown put on and they had to pump me full of 3 times the
    > normal novacain dose at both sittings. I just waited until later that
    > night to eat.
    >
    > Paul
    >
    > "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:18uXj.47269$[email protected]..
    >> is a strange experience!
    >> I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone
    >> density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to
    >> numb. So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt at fixing this
    >> tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of throwing up, he tried
    >> something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't tell me until
    >> after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me,
    >> for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the
    >> day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >>
    >>
    >> kimberly

    >
    >
    >




    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Saturday, 05(V)/17(XVII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Armed Forces Day
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 1dys 22hrs 25mins
    -------------------------------------------
    Butterflies. If you throw it.
    -------------------------------------------


  17. #17
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    After my extraction today, I've had nothing but liquids; cream soups,
    milkshakes, plain ice cream, etc. I'll probably continue that for a couple
    of days, mainly because I'm paranoid about getting any particles of food in
    the cavity left by the extraction.

    Wayne

    On Sat 17 May 2008 01:16:13a, Paul M. Cook told us...

    > Best to just not eat. You can easily bite your tongue or cheek and
    > cause some real damage. 8 hours without food is just not a big deal.
    > If you just can't stand it, some fruit juices or soup would be fine. I
    > just had a crown put on and they had to pump me full of 3 times the
    > normal novacain dose at both sittings. I just waited until later that
    > night to eat.
    >
    > Paul
    >
    > "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:18uXj.47269$[email protected]..
    >> is a strange experience!
    >> I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with bone
    >> density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it harder to
    >> numb. So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt at fixing this
    >> tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of throwing up, he tried
    >> something new. I think it's called Marcaine? He didn't tell me until
    >> after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or more hours! It did numb me,
    >> for which I am grateful, but eating was not easy to do the rest of the
    >> day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >>
    >>
    >> kimberly

    >
    >
    >




    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Saturday, 05(V)/17(XVII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Armed Forces Day
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 1dys 22hrs 25mins
    -------------------------------------------
    Butterflies. If you throw it.
    -------------------------------------------


  18. #18
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Fri 16 May 2008 10:34:49p, Nexis told us...
    >
    >> is a strange experience!
    >> I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with
    >> bone density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it
    >> harder to numb. So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt
    >> at fixing this tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of
    >> throwing up, he tried something new. I think it's called Marcaine?
    >> He didn't tell me until after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or
    >> more hours! It did numb me, for which I am grateful, but eating was
    >> not easy to do the rest of the day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat
    >> numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >>
    >>
    >> kimberly
    >>

    >
    > Coincidentally, a week ago I went to the dentist with a very painful
    > tooth, to learn that it was a very bad abscess. I've been taking an
    > anti- infective drug since then and Percoset as needed for pain. I
    > went this morning to have the tooth extracted. The dentist remarked,
    > from looking at the x-ray, that he had seldom seen anyone with teeth
    > that had such long roots. Just what I wanted to hear. :-( In any
    > event, he may have used that same local anesthetic on me, because it
    > remained numb far longer than anything else I'd experienced before.
    > Boy, when that finally wore off tonight I thought I'd hit the ceiling
    > with pain, so took a dose of Percoset, which has helped somewhat. I
    > *wish* I was still numb! :-)


    I feel your pain. I also have had dental work done this last couple of
    weeks. I don't know what anaesthetic he used but I was numb for a while and
    was very careful.



  19. #19
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Fri 16 May 2008 10:34:49p, Nexis told us...
    >
    >> is a strange experience!
    >> I am, apparently, hard to numb. The dentist said it has to do with
    >> bone density, and said that it's good to have it, but makes it
    >> harder to numb. So, after seeing in my chart that the last attempt
    >> at fixing this tooth resulted in 5 shots of Novocain and lots of
    >> throwing up, he tried something new. I think it's called Marcaine?
    >> He didn't tell me until after the needle was in that it lasts 8 or
    >> more hours! It did numb me, for which I am grateful, but eating was
    >> not easy to do the rest of the day! Luckily, I still feel somewhat
    >> numb, so there's no pain ;-)
    >>
    >>
    >> kimberly
    >>

    >
    > Coincidentally, a week ago I went to the dentist with a very painful
    > tooth, to learn that it was a very bad abscess. I've been taking an
    > anti- infective drug since then and Percoset as needed for pain. I
    > went this morning to have the tooth extracted. The dentist remarked,
    > from looking at the x-ray, that he had seldom seen anyone with teeth
    > that had such long roots. Just what I wanted to hear. :-( In any
    > event, he may have used that same local anesthetic on me, because it
    > remained numb far longer than anything else I'd experienced before.
    > Boy, when that finally wore off tonight I thought I'd hit the ceiling
    > with pain, so took a dose of Percoset, which has helped somewhat. I
    > *wish* I was still numb! :-)


    I feel your pain. I also have had dental work done this last couple of
    weeks. I don't know what anaesthetic he used but I was numb for a while and
    was very careful.



  20. #20
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Eating after dental work...

    > I can't substantiate this, but I read somewhere years ago that
    > dentists, as a category of occupation, have the highest incidence of
    > suicide, presumably because of how they patients feel about going to
    > the dentist, and that they are frequently causing pain. It sounds a
    > bit far-fetched, but not totally implausible.


    Heh. I don't think that includes my dentist. He is a very jolly fellow)
    He knows how I hate needles so he doesn't tell me about it, he just creeps
    up on me ))



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