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Thread: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

  1. #1
    Kajikit Guest

    Default Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

    I made a 'Dutch' apple pancake the other day and while it was
    delicious it wasn't the dutch pancakes I remember having when I was a
    kid... for a very good reason - a 'Dutch' pancake in the US is from
    the Pennsylvania Dutch ie. German, not from Holland. It's very good,
    but not the same thing at all. But it was close enough to bring back
    old memories. When I was a kid there used to be a very special Dutch
    restaurant fairly close to our house, and it was an annual birthday
    pilgrimage to go there and get one of their Dutch pancakes. It had all
    the toppings cooked right into it and it was crispy and delicious. And
    then for dessert we'd have chocolate crepes.

    Does anyone know how to make those Dutch pancakes? I wasn't able to
    find a recipe online and I'd love to make them for DH...

  2. #2
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

    On Mar 14, 10:12*am, Kajikit <kaji...@jagcon.com> wrote:
    > I made a 'Dutch' apple pancake the other day and while it was
    > delicious it wasn't the dutch pancakes I remember having when I was a
    > kid... for a very good reason - a 'Dutch' pancake in the US is from
    > the Pennsylvania Dutch ie. German, not from Holland. It's very good,
    > but not the same thing at all. But it was close enough to bring back
    > old memories. When I was a kid there used to be a very special Dutch
    > restaurant fairly close to our house, and it was an annual birthday
    > pilgrimage to go there and get one of their Dutch pancakes. It had all
    > the toppings cooked right into it and it was crispy and delicious. And
    > then for dessert we'd have chocolate crepes.
    >
    > Does anyone know how to make those Dutch pancakes? I wasn't able to
    > find a recipe online and I'd love to make them for DH...


    Here's the one from Cook's Illustrated:

    GERMAN APPLE PANCAKE
    American Classics by Editors of Cook's Illustrated Magazine

    Serves 4

    Tradition dictates that this supersized pancake should be cooked in a
    cast-iron skillet, but we found that an oven-safe, nonstick skillet
    worked significantly better. If you want to use cast-iron, reduce the
    heat to medium-high after five minutes when cooking the apples;
    otherwise they may burn in the oven because the cast iron retains so
    much heat. And be careful removing the pancake from a cast-iron
    skillet; it may stick unless your pan is very well seasoned. We chose
    Cranny Smith apples for their tartness and firm texture and their
    availability, but if you have access to similar, more interesting
    varieties, such as Rhode Island Greening or Mutsus, by all means try
    them.

    2 large eggs
    3/4 cup half-and-half
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1 tablespoon granulated sugar
    1/2 cup (2 1/2 ounces) unbleached all-purpose flour
    1 tablespoon unsalted butter
    3 medium Granny Smith apples (about 1 1/4 pounds), peeled, cored, and
    cut into 1/4-inch slices
    1/4 cup packed light brown sugar
    2 tablespoons confectioners' sugar
    Maple syrup, warmed

    1. Adjust an oven rack to the middle position and heat the oven to 500
    degrees. Combine the eggs, half-and-half, vanilla, salt, and
    granulated sugar in the workbowl of a food processor or a blender jar
    and process until well combined, about 15 seconds. Add the flour and
    process until thoroughly mixed and free of lumps, about 30 seconds;
    set the batter aside.

    2. Add the butter to a 10-inch ovenproof nonstick skillet and heat
    over medium-high heat until the butter foams. Add the apples and
    sprinkle the brown sugar evenly over them. Cook, stirring
    occasionally, until the apples begin to turn light brown, about 5
    minutes. Continue to cook over medium-high heat, stirring constantly,
    until the apples are golden brown, 4 to 5 minutes.

    3. Remove the pan from the heat. Quickly pour the batter into the pan
    and place the pan in the oven. Reduce the heat to 425 degrees and cook
    until browned and puffed, 16 to 17 minutes. With a rubber spatula,
    slide the pancake out of the skillet onto a serving platter, dust it
    with confectioners' sugar, and serve immediately, accompanied by
    warmed maple syrup.


    Hope it helps,
    Kris

  3. #3
    Kajikit Guest

    Default Re: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

    On Sat, 14 Mar 2009 07:21:57 -0700 (PDT), Kris <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Mar 14, 10:12*am, Kajikit <kaji...@jagcon.com> wrote:
    >> I made a 'Dutch' apple pancake the other day and while it was
    >> delicious it wasn't the dutch pancakes I remember having when I was a
    >> kid... for a very good reason - a 'Dutch' pancake in the US is from
    >> the Pennsylvania Dutch ie. German, not from Holland. It's very good,
    >> but not the same thing at all. But it was close enough to bring back
    >> old memories. When I was a kid there used to be a very special Dutch
    >> restaurant fairly close to our house, and it was an annual birthday
    >> pilgrimage to go there and get one of their Dutch pancakes. It had all
    >> the toppings cooked right into it and it was crispy and delicious. And
    >> then for dessert we'd have chocolate crepes.
    >>
    >> Does anyone know how to make those Dutch pancakes? I wasn't able to
    >> find a recipe online and I'd love to make them for DH...

    >
    >Here's the one from Cook's Illustrated:
    >
    >GERMAN APPLE PANCAKE
    >American Classics by Editors of Cook's Illustrated Magazine


    Thanks Kris... but I already know how to make a German apple pancake.
    I need to find out how to make an authentic DUTCH one, preferably
    savoury...

  4. #4
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

    Kajikit said...

    > Thanks Kris... but I already know how to make a German apple pancake.
    > I need to find out how to make an authentic DUTCH one, preferably
    > savoury...



    Kajikit,

    Heck I don't wanna make one, I JUST WANT ONE! :9

    Best,

    Andy

  5. #5
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

    Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I made a 'Dutch' apple pancake the other day and while it was
    > delicious it wasn't the dutch pancakes I remember having when I was a
    > kid... for a very good reason - a 'Dutch' pancake in the US is from
    > the Pennsylvania Dutch ie. German, not from Holland. It's very good,
    > but not the same thing at all. But it was close enough to bring back
    > old memories. When I was a kid there used to be a very special Dutch
    > restaurant fairly close to our house, and it was an annual birthday
    > pilgrimage to go there and get one of their Dutch pancakes. It had all
    > the toppings cooked right into it and it was crispy and delicious. And
    > then for dessert we'd have chocolate crepes.


    One kind of traditional Dutch pancakes are "poffertjes". They are made
    of equal parts of wheat and buckwheat and are very little (size of a
    large coin) and relatively sweet. Traditionally, they are served with
    sugar-beet syrup called "stroop".

    Another Dutch specialty is "pannekoeken", typically served in a
    "pannekoekenhuis", "pancake house", a kind of restaurant found all over
    The Netherlands. These pancakes are large (a size of a plate, or even
    larger) and are often made as you describe, with the various toppings
    cooked right into them. The toppings can be savoury or sweet.
    Pannekoeken are often served with "stroop", too.

    Here is a nice pannekoek recipe:

    <http://recipes.egullet.org/recipes/r1445.html>

    Victor

  6. #6
    pure kona Guest

    Default Re: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

    On Sat, 14 Mar 2009 11:18:56 -0400, Kajikit <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Sat, 14 Mar 2009 07:21:57 -0700 (PDT), Kris <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >


    >Thanks Kris... but I already know how to make a German apple pancake.
    >I need to find out how to make an authentic DUTCH one, preferably
    >savoury...


    I was lucky enough to go to Amsterdam last August, never had heard of
    a Dutch pancake, but once there- I ate them often! Yes savory was
    wonderful. I think I had sort of a ham and cheese one- thin, huge and
    crisp. At the time, I felt it was more of a crepe but again, it was
    shiny but not oily. Thin and savory. Alas, nothing like that to be
    found in Hawaii-or at least not where I live. Thanks for the
    memory.

    aloha,
    Cea

  7. #7
    Kajikit Guest

    Default Re: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

    On Sat, 14 Mar 2009 18:00:48 +0100, [email protected] (Victor Sack)
    wrote:

    >Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I made a 'Dutch' apple pancake the other day and while it was
    >> delicious it wasn't the dutch pancakes I remember having when I was a
    >> kid... for a very good reason - a 'Dutch' pancake in the US is from
    >> the Pennsylvania Dutch ie. German, not from Holland. It's very good,
    >> but not the same thing at all. But it was close enough to bring back
    >> old memories. When I was a kid there used to be a very special Dutch
    >> restaurant fairly close to our house, and it was an annual birthday
    >> pilgrimage to go there and get one of their Dutch pancakes. It had all
    >> the toppings cooked right into it and it was crispy and delicious. And
    >> then for dessert we'd have chocolate crepes.

    >
    >One kind of traditional Dutch pancakes are "poffertjes". They are made
    >of equal parts of wheat and buckwheat and are very little (size of a
    >large coin) and relatively sweet. Traditionally, they are served with
    >sugar-beet syrup called "stroop".
    >
    >Another Dutch specialty is "pannekoeken", typically served in a
    >"pannekoekenhuis", "pancake house", a kind of restaurant found all over
    >The Netherlands. These pancakes are large (a size of a plate, or even
    >larger) and are often made as you describe, with the various toppings
    >cooked right into them. The toppings can be savoury or sweet.
    >Pannekoeken are often served with "stroop", too.
    >
    >Here is a nice pannekoek recipe:
    >
    ><http://recipes.egullet.org/recipes/r1445.html>
    >
    >Victor


    Thanks Victor! This looks a lot more crepey than the pancakes I
    remember... but I'll play with it. From the sounds of it, it would
    probably work with regular pancake batter - just put the bacon and
    onion into the pan and pour the batter on top.

  8. #8
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

    Kajikit <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:
    > >
    > ><http://recipes.egullet.org/recipes/r1445.html>

    >
    > Thanks Victor! This looks a lot more crepey than the pancakes I
    > remember... but I'll play with it. From the sounds of it, it would
    > probably work with regular pancake batter - just put the bacon and
    > onion into the pan and pour the batter on top.


    Some recipes call for baking powder.

    Victor

  9. #9
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

    Kajikit wrote:
    >
    > I made a 'Dutch' apple pancake the other day and while it was
    > delicious it wasn't the dutch pancakes I remember having when I was a
    > kid... for a very good reason - a 'Dutch' pancake in the US is from
    > the Pennsylvania Dutch ie. German, not from Holland. It's very good,
    > but not the same thing at all. But it was close enough to bring back
    > old memories. When I was a kid there used to be a very special Dutch
    > restaurant fairly close to our house, and it was an annual birthday
    > pilgrimage to go there and get one of their Dutch pancakes. It had all
    > the toppings cooked right into it and it was crispy and delicious. And
    > then for dessert we'd have chocolate crepes.
    >
    > Does anyone know how to make those Dutch pancakes? I wasn't able to
    > find a recipe online and I'd love to make them for DH...


    Could it be something called a 'dutch baby'?? They're sort of a thin
    pancake cooked in cast iron skillets, or something like that, I think?
    I remember Alton Brown had one show that featured popovers and 'dutch
    babies' - the recipes for both were very similar just different
    proportions of the same ingredients, IIRC.

    Sky

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice

  10. #10
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?

    Victor Sack wrote:

    > Another Dutch specialty is "pannekoeken", typically served in a
    > "pannekoekenhuis", "pancake house", a kind of restaurant found all over
    > The Netherlands. These pancakes are large (a size of a plate, or even
    > larger) and are often made as you describe, with the various toppings
    > cooked right into them. The toppings can be savoury or sweet.
    > Pannekoeken are often served with "stroop", too.


    This is what I remember from The Netherlands. I could eat anyplace but I
    loved going to this one neighborhood pannkoekenhuis and getting the
    pannekoeken with a savory mushroom filling/sauce. LOVED that stuff!!

  11. #11
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Dutch pancakes (from Holland, not Germany)?



    Kajikit wrote:
    >
    > I made a 'Dutch' apple pancake the other day and while it was
    > delicious it wasn't the dutch pancakes I remember having when I was a
    > kid... for a very good reason - a 'Dutch' pancake in the US is from
    > the Pennsylvania Dutch ie. German, not from Holland. It's very good,
    > but not the same thing at all. But it was close enough to bring back
    > old memories. When I was a kid there used to be a very special Dutch
    > restaurant fairly close to our house, and it was an annual birthday
    > pilgrimage to go there and get one of their Dutch pancakes. It had all
    > the toppings cooked right into it and it was crispy and delicious. And
    > then for dessert we'd have chocolate crepes.
    >
    > Does anyone know how to make those Dutch pancakes? I wasn't able to
    > find a recipe online and I'd love to make them for DH...



    Try this one: From 'Oudnederlanse streekrecepten' Translated by me

    Batter:

    250 g flour (1/2 lb, about 2 cups)
    2 eggs, beaten
    400 ml (about 1 2/3 c) warm milk
    2 tsp yeast
    1 tsp salt
    4 sour cooking apples
    fat for frying


    Dissolve the yeast in a little of the warm milk; let stand until foamy.
    Place the flour and salt in a bowl, add the eggs. Add the yeast and
    enough milk to make a smooth batter. Let stand in a warm place until
    ready to use. Core, peel and slice the apples about 1/4 inch thick.
    Heat fat in a heavy frying pan and lay the apple slices in it. Fry
    gently and add batter to barely cover. Fry both sides of the pancake
    brown and done.

    Eet smakelijk!

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