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Thread: Dumplings

  1. #1
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Dumplings

    I was recently reminded of my dear, departed grandmothers dumplings. I
    hadn't had decent chicken-and-dumplings since 1960, when my grandfather died
    and my grandmother moved to away to live with my aunt.

    I have tried to make chicken and dumplings on a number of occasions and have
    been unsatisfied with the result. My grandmother actually made two kinds of
    dumplings; rolled dumpling for chicken-and-dumplings and drop for a dessert
    of sweet-and-sour dumplings.

    The rolled dumplings seemed not to have any, or much, leavening; they were
    generally rolled thin, maybe 1/8th inch, and were no more than 1/4" thick
    when done. The result was a dumpling with a bit of "tooth". Her drop
    dumplings were pretty much what you might imagine a drop biscuit to be if it
    were boiled, not baked.

    While shopping the frozen food section at the supermarket, I noticed a
    package of Mary B's Dumplings, made by Homade Foods Inc. The package
    contained 24 ounces of thin (about 1/8") stips of uncooked dumplings. I
    decided to give them a try and stopped by the meat department for chicken.
    I opted for 4 pounds of chicken thighs rather than a whole chicken.

    I boiled the chicken thighs until falling off the bone. I removed the
    chicken from the stock and chilled both. Later, I removed most of the
    chicken fat that had risen to the top of the broth and solidified, freezing
    for future use. I picked the skin and bones from the meat, discarding the
    bone and saving the skin to fry later as treats for my dog. Following
    package directions, I cooked about a pound of Mary B's Dumplings in the
    chicken stock, seasoned to my taste with salt and pepper, added the reserved
    chicken and a few vegetables. The result wasn't quite as good as my
    grandmother's; but, it was a very satisfying chicken-and-dumplings.

    I could never duplicate the chicken-and-dumplings I remember; the chickens
    were raised in the backyard, the water hand-pumped from a well and
    everything cooked (or baked) was done using a coal stove. But, I'll be
    making my (and Mary B's) version again, 'cause its as close as I'm likely to
    get to that favorite dish of years ago. Heck, I'm encourage enough to even
    try my hand at sweet-and-sour dumplings; I'll be trying the Hillibilly
    Housewife's recipe real soon now.

    http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/sw...-dumplings.htm
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings

    On Wed, 11 Apr 2012 16:13:34 GMT, "l, not -l" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > While shopping the frozen food section at the supermarket, I noticed a
    > package of Mary B's Dumplings, made by Homade Foods Inc. The package
    > contained 24 ounces of thin (about 1/8") stips of uncooked dumplings. I
    > decided to give them a try and stopped by the meat department for chicken.
    > I opted for 4 pounds of chicken thighs rather than a whole chicken.


    Are you in the South? I tried to find a brand of frozen biscuits once
    that Jill always talks about, but all we have is Pillsbury. We have
    frozen Chinese/Asian dumplings here, nothing Southern.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  3. #3
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings


    On 11-Apr-2012, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 11 Apr 2012 16:13:34 GMT, "l, not -l" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > While shopping the frozen food section at the supermarket, I noticed a
    > > package of Mary B's Dumplings, made by Homade Foods Inc. The package
    > > contained 24 ounces of thin (about 1/8") stips of uncooked dumplings.
    > > I
    > > decided to give them a try and stopped by the meat department for
    > > chicken.
    > > I opted for 4 pounds of chicken thighs rather than a whole chicken.

    >
    > Are you in the South? I tried to find a brand of frozen biscuits once
    > that Jill always talks about, but all we have is Pillsbury. We have
    > frozen Chinese/Asian dumplings here, nothing Southern.


    I'm in St. Louis Missouri (STL) - it's considered the midwest, not the
    south.

    Perhaps an inquiry via their Contact Us page can find if, and where,
    available in your area.
    http://www.homadefoods.com/index.aspx
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  4. #4
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings


    l,*not*-l wrote:

    >I was recently reminded of my dear,
    > departed grandmothers dumplings. * I
    > hadn't had decent
    > chicken-and-dumplings since 1960,
    > when my grandfather died and my
    > grandmother moved to away to live with
    > my aunt.


    I've always used the recipe in my old Betty Crocker cookbook, and is the
    one my mother always used too for soups, etc. They are always light and
    fluffy.

    Dumplings

    Stir together in a bowl:
    1-1/2 cups flour
    2 tsp. baking powder
    3/4 tsp. salt

    Cut in (with pastry blender):
    3 tbsp. shortening

    Add: 3/4 cup milk at once, stirring only until blended, and no flour
    shows...do NOT over-mix. Immediately drop by spoonfuls onto chicken or
    meat in boiling meat stock. Cook slowly for 10 minutes UNCOVERED, and 10
    minutes more, tightly covered. To prevent soggy dumplings, do NOT use
    self basting cover, or lift lid until the cooking time is up. Makes
    about 9 or 10 good sized dumplings.

    This is what my mother used for the top of cobblers.

    Mix together: 1 cup flour, 1 tbsp. sugar, 1-1/2 tsp. baking powder, 1/2
    tsp. salt.
    Cut in: 3 tbsp. shortening.
    Stir in: 1/2 cup milk just until blended. Drop by spoonfuls on the top
    of the hot fruit mixture and bake until golden brown, about 25 minutes
    at 400

    I haven't had cobbler in a long time, but if I remember right, these are
    more like a rich shortcake biscuit.

    Never seen commercial dumplings to buy in a store, and never heard of
    rolled dumplings.

    Judy


  5. #5
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings


    "Judy Haffner" <wrote, in part >I've always used the recipe in my old Betty
    Crocker cookbook, and is the
    one my mother always used too for soups, etc. They are always light and
    fluffy.

    Judy

    Big difference there, Judy. 'Southern dumplings' are not light and fluffy,
    more like rolled ver thin, dried a little and boiled in broth. Seems like
    the origin is Dutch. I have no idea how the South came to do dumplings a
    Dutch way. Polly


  6. #6
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings


    Polly wrote:

    >Big difference there, Judy. 'Southern
    > dumplings' are not light and fluffy, more
    > like rolled ver thin, dried a little and
    > boiled in broth. Seems like the origin is
    > Dutch. I have no idea how the South
    > came to do dumplings a Dutch way.


    Not being Dutch OR from the South <G> I've never heard of rolled
    dumplings, nor ever eaten them.

    My German friend made them with potatoes, and thought they were the
    best, but I found them very heavy and course, and not all that pleasing
    to my palate, so guess it's whatever a person gets use to. I love the
    dumplings like my mama always made, and would rather have them than the
    soup, or whatever I'm cooking them on top of.

    Judy


  7. #7
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings

    l, not -l wrote:
    > I was recently reminded of my dear, departed grandmothers dumplings.
    > I hadn't had decent chicken-and-dumplings since 1960, when my
    > grandfather died and my grandmother moved to away to live with my
    > aunt.
    >
    > I have tried to make chicken and dumplings on a number of occasions
    > and have been unsatisfied with the result. My grandmother actually
    > made two kinds of dumplings; rolled dumpling for
    > chicken-and-dumplings and drop for a dessert of sweet-and-sour
    > dumplings.
    >
    > The rolled dumplings seemed not to have any, or much, leavening; they
    > were generally rolled thin, maybe 1/8th inch, and were no more than
    > 1/4" thick when done. The result was a dumpling with a bit of
    > "tooth". Her drop dumplings were pretty much what you might imagine
    > a drop biscuit to be if it were boiled, not baked.
    >
    > While shopping the frozen food section at the supermarket, I noticed a
    > package of Mary B's Dumplings, made by Homade Foods Inc. The package
    > contained 24 ounces of thin (about 1/8") stips of uncooked dumplings.
    > I decided to give them a try and stopped by the meat department for
    > chicken. I opted for 4 pounds of chicken thighs rather than a whole
    > chicken.
    >
    > I boiled the chicken thighs until falling off the bone. I removed the
    > chicken from the stock and chilled both. Later, I removed most of the
    > chicken fat that had risen to the top of the broth and solidified,
    > freezing for future use. I picked the skin and bones from the meat,
    > discarding the bone and saving the skin to fry later as treats for my
    > dog. Following package directions, I cooked about a pound of Mary
    > B's Dumplings in the chicken stock, seasoned to my taste with salt
    > and pepper, added the reserved chicken and a few vegetables. The
    > result wasn't quite as good as my grandmother's; but, it was a very
    > satisfying chicken-and-dumplings.
    >
    > I could never duplicate the chicken-and-dumplings I remember; the
    > chickens were raised in the backyard, the water hand-pumped from a
    > well and everything cooked (or baked) was done using a coal stove.
    > But, I'll be making my (and Mary B's) version again, 'cause its as
    > close as I'm likely to get to that favorite dish of years ago. Heck,
    > I'm encourage enough to even try my hand at sweet-and-sour dumplings;
    > I'll be trying the Hillibilly Housewife's recipe real soon now.
    >
    > http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/sw...-dumplings.htm


    My MIL made rolled dumplings with an Amish recipe. They were like thick
    noodles.



  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings

    On Wed, 11 Apr 2012 16:13:34 GMT, l, not -l wrote:

    > While shopping the frozen food section at the supermarket, I noticed a
    > package of Mary B's Dumplings, made by Homade Foods Inc. The package
    > contained 24 ounces of thin (about 1/8") stips of uncooked dumplings.


    There was a thread about these not too long ago. Another brand was
    mentioned as well:

    http://www.marzetti.com/products/rea...ings-12-oz.htm

    Which may be easier to find since they're a national brand (Marzetti).

    I've also seen an Amish (sounding) brand that is in dried form. big
    thick noodle squares. I tried those and was not impressed at all.

    -sw

  9. #9
    isw Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Judy Haffner) wrote:

    > Polly wrote:
    >
    > >Big difference there, Judy. 'Southern
    > > dumplings' are not light and fluffy, more
    > > like rolled ver thin, dried a little and
    > > boiled in broth. Seems like the origin is
    > > Dutch. I have no idea how the South
    > > came to do dumplings a Dutch way.

    >
    > Not being Dutch OR from the South <G> I've never heard of rolled
    > dumplings, nor ever eaten them.


    Well, try this, then; it's a family recipe from Arkansas:

    Chicken and Dumplings

    Ingredients:

    1 lb. bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts and thighs
    1 qt. prepared chicken stock
    2 cups flour
    1 tsp. salt
    1/2 tsp. white pepper
    1 1/2 Tbsp. vegetable shortening such as Crisco
    1/2 cup buttermilk, about

    Directions:

    Place the chicken stock and an equal amount of water in a large pot.
    Rinse chicken parts, place in pot, and bring to simmer over low to
    medium heat (try not to boil). simmer at about 180-190 F for 45 minutes
    to an hour. Remove chicken to a plate to cool. Add another quart of
    water, and strengthen flavor with a bit of chicken base, if desired.

    Prepare dumplings:
    In a large bowl, mix flour, pepper, and salt. Use a pastry cutter or
    fingers to work shortening into flour. Add buttermilk and hot broth
    alternately to form a stiff dough (should take about one cup of liquid
    *total*). Divide dough in half. Roll out one half on floured surface to
    pie-crust thickness (about 1/8"). Cut into one-inch-wide strips, and
    picking up a few strips at the time, stretch and tear off inch-long
    pieces and drop them into the *boiling* broth, stirring from time to
    time to prevent sticking (if broth is not boiling, dumplings may fuse
    into one large mass). Repeat with other half of dough. After all
    dumplings have been added, reduce heat and simmer, stirring
    occasionally, for about fifteen minutes, or until "raw flour" taste is
    gone from dumplings.

    Meanwhile, remove meat from cooled chicken pieces, and discard bones,
    gristle, and skin. Cut meat into spoon-sized pieces or shred, as
    desired, and add to simmering pot when dumplings are almost done.

    Serve in bowls as a thick soup.

    Leftovers (if any) can be refrigerated for a few days, and "revived" in
    a microwave just fine, although a bit of water might be needed to make
    up for what the dumplings will have absorbed.

    Beef stock and boiled beef would work, too, and my grandmother used to
    make it that way about as often as with chicken.

    --

    I know these are sort of odd "dumplings" but that's what they were
    called, and I never knew my grandmother or my mother to make any other
    kind (the "fluffy" ones). Both of them used to make the dumplings
    "drier", so they could be served on a plate, like rice or mashed
    potatoes. I like them more like a thick soup.

    Isaac

  10. #10
    KenK Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings

    [email protected] (Judy Haffner) wrote in news:573-4F85EA1E-1323
    @storefull-3252.bay.webtv.net:

    >
    > l,*not*-l wrote:
    >
    >>I was recently reminded of my dear,
    >> departed grandmothers dumplings. * I
    >> hadn't had decent
    >> chicken-and-dumplings since 1960,
    >> when my grandfather died and my
    >> grandmother moved to away to live with
    >> my aunt.

    >
    > I've always used the recipe in my old Betty Crocker cookbook, and is

    the
    > one my mother always used too for soups, etc. They are always light and
    > fluffy.
    >
    > Dumplings
    >
    > Stir together in a bowl:
    > 1-1/2 cups flour
    > 2 tsp. baking powder
    > 3/4 tsp. salt
    >
    > Cut in (with pastry blender):
    > 3 tbsp. shortening
    >
    > Add: 3/4 cup milk at once, stirring only until blended, and no flour
    > shows...do NOT over-mix. Immediately drop by spoonfuls onto chicken or
    > meat in boiling meat stock. Cook slowly for 10 minutes UNCOVERED, and

    10
    > minutes more, tightly covered. To prevent soggy dumplings, do NOT use
    > self basting cover, or lift lid until the cooking time is up. Makes
    > about 9 or 10 good sized dumplings.
    >


    This is almost exactly the same recipe I inherited from my mother, and
    she from hers, but without the baking powder. I cook mine slightly
    differently too - in water 15 minutes covered.

    > This is what my mother used for the top of cobblers.
    >
    > Mix together: 1 cup flour, 1 tbsp. sugar, 1-1/2 tsp. baking powder, 1/2
    > tsp. salt.
    > Cut in: 3 tbsp. shortening.
    > Stir in: 1/2 cup milk just until blended. Drop by spoonfuls on the top
    > of the hot fruit mixture and bake until golden brown, about 25 minutes
    > at 400
    >
    > I haven't had cobbler in a long time, but if I remember right, these

    are
    > more like a rich shortcake biscuit.
    >
    > Never seen commercial dumplings to buy in a store, and never heard of
    > rolled dumplings.
    >
    > Judy
    >




    --
    "Experience is something you don't get until
    just after you need it." Steven Wright








  11. #11
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Judy Haffner) wrote:

    > Dumplings
    >
    > Stir together in a bowl:
    > 1-1/2 cups flour
    > 2 tsp. baking powder
    > 3/4 tsp. salt
    >
    > Cut in (with pastry blender):
    > 3 tbsp. shortening
    >
    > Add: 3/4 cup milk at once, stirring only until blended, and no flour
    > shows...do NOT over-mix. Immediately drop by spoonfuls onto chicken or
    > meat in boiling meat stock. Cook slowly for 10 minutes UNCOVERED, and 10
    > minutes more, tightly covered. To prevent soggy dumplings, do NOT use
    > self basting cover, or lift lid until the cooking time is up. Makes
    > about 9 or 10 good sized dumplings.


    Or use Bisquick with directions on the package and some chopped fresh
    parsley mixed in <http://tinypic.com/r/ehestg/5> on a simmering stew. I
    grew up with this stuff. DW grew up with sinker dumplings that I have
    never mastered... or cared to. As long as she pretends to be grateful
    for mine, I plow along.

    leo

  12. #12
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Dumplings


    "l, not -l" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jm4ajn$ov7$[email protected]..
    > I was recently reminded of my dear, departed grandmothers dumplings. I
    > hadn't had decent chicken-and-dumplings since 1960, when my grandfather
    > died
    > and my grandmother moved to away to live with my aunt.
    >
    > I have tried to make chicken and dumplings on a number of occasions and
    > have
    > been unsatisfied with the result. My grandmother actually made two kinds
    > of
    > dumplings; rolled dumpling for chicken-and-dumplings and drop for a
    > dessert
    > of sweet-and-sour dumplings.
    >
    > The rolled dumplings seemed not to have any, or much, leavening; they were
    > generally rolled thin, maybe 1/8th inch, and were no more than 1/4" thick
    > when done. The result was a dumpling with a bit of "tooth". Her drop
    > dumplings were pretty much what you might imagine a drop biscuit to be if
    > it
    > were boiled, not baked.
    >
    > While shopping the frozen food section at the supermarket, I noticed a
    > package of Mary B's Dumplings, made by Homade Foods Inc. The package
    > contained 24 ounces of thin (about 1/8") stips of uncooked dumplings. I
    > decided to give them a try and stopped by the meat department for chicken.
    > I opted for 4 pounds of chicken thighs rather than a whole chicken.
    >
    > I boiled the chicken thighs until falling off the bone. I removed the
    > chicken from the stock and chilled both. Later, I removed most of the
    > chicken fat that had risen to the top of the broth and solidified,
    > freezing
    > for future use. I picked the skin and bones from the meat, discarding the
    > bone and saving the skin to fry later as treats for my dog. Following
    > package directions, I cooked about a pound of Mary B's Dumplings in the
    > chicken stock, seasoned to my taste with salt and pepper, added the
    > reserved
    > chicken and a few vegetables. The result wasn't quite as good as my
    > grandmother's; but, it was a very satisfying chicken-and-dumplings.
    >
    > I could never duplicate the chicken-and-dumplings I remember; the chickens
    > were raised in the backyard, the water hand-pumped from a well and
    > everything cooked (or baked) was done using a coal stove. But, I'll be
    > making my (and Mary B's) version again, 'cause its as close as I'm likely
    > to
    > get to that favorite dish of years ago. Heck, I'm encourage enough to
    > even
    > try my hand at sweet-and-sour dumplings; I'll be trying the Hillibilly
    > Housewife's recipe real soon now.
    >
    > http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/sw...-dumplings.htm
    > --
    >
    > Change Cujo to Juno in email address.



    I usually make drop dumplings (lately with a little cornmeal thrown in).
    But as for making scratch biscuits... nope. I simply lost the knack.
    Frozen Mary B's biscuits definitely do the trick! I really like that brand.

    Jill


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