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Thread: Dubliner Artichoke Dip

  1. #1
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Dubliner Artichoke Dip

    While looking for recipes to use the stash of Irish cheeses my neighbors
    gave me to baby sit their dog and cats, I came across this recipe on
    igourmet.com, which is where they ordered my gifts from. I'll give it a
    try this afternoon. Sort of a twist on an old standby.

    Dubliner Artichoke Dip
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Ingredients:

    12oz artichokes hearts, chopped
    1 cup mayonnaise
    1 small clove garlic, minced
    2 tablespoons oregano
    2 tablespoons grated onion
    2 cups Dubliner or Vintage Irish Cheddar Cheese, grated


    Directions:

    Combine all ingredients and spoon the mixture into an 8 in. baking dish.
    Bake for 30 minutes at 300░ F.

    Serve with crackers, pita bread or tortilla chips.


    Michael
    --
    Best license plate seen in a long time.

    ~ S CARGO ~

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  2. #2
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip


    "Michael "Dog3"" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected] ..
    > While looking for recipes to use the stash of Irish cheeses my neighbors
    > gave me to baby sit their dog and cats, I came across this recipe on
    > igourmet.com, which is where they ordered my gifts from. I'll give it a
    > try this afternoon. Sort of a twist on an old standby.
    >
    > Dubliner Artichoke Dip
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Ingredients:
    >
    > 12oz artichokes hearts, chopped
    > 1 cup mayonnaise
    > 1 small clove garlic, minced
    > 2 tablespoons oregano
    > 2 tablespoons grated onion
    > 2 cups Dubliner or Vintage Irish Cheddar Cheese, grated
    >
    >
    > Directions:
    >
    > Combine all ingredients and spoon the mixture into an 8 in. baking dish.
    > Bake for 30 minutes at 300░ F.
    >
    > Serve with crackers, pita bread or tortilla chips.
    >
    >

    Be careful with the oregano.
    If you use dried oregano, use at most 1 teaspoon.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner



  3. #3
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip

    "Michael Kuettner" <[email protected]>
    news:g4lda9$8jh$[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    > Be careful with the oregano.
    > If you use dried oregano, use at most 1 teaspoon.
    >
    > Cheers,


    Thanks for the tip Michael. I've not used oregano in the artichoke dips
    before.

    Michael

    --
    Best license plate seen in a long time.

    ~ S CARGO ~

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  4. #4
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip


    "Michael "Dog3"" schrieb :
    > "Michael Kuettner" write :
    >
    >> Be careful with the oregano.
    >> If you use dried oregano, use at most 1 teaspoon.
    >>
    >> Cheers,

    >
    > Thanks for the tip Michael. I've not used oregano in the artichoke dips
    > before.
    >

    You're welcome.
    I just gave the warning since I seldom see oregano used in the recipes
    given here.

    Fresh oregano is heavenly.
    When it is dried, it becomes more "concentrated" and develops a hint
    of bitter taste.
    If not used sparingly, it can overpower the dish.
    If you plan to use fresh oregano for this dish, use just the leaves.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner



  5. #5
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip

    Michael "Dog3" said...

    > While looking for recipes to use the stash of Irish cheeses my neighbors
    > gave me to baby sit their dog and cats, I came across this recipe on
    > igourmet.com, which is where they ordered my gifts from. I'll give it a
    > try this afternoon. Sort of a twist on an old standby.
    >
    > Dubliner Artichoke Dip
    > -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Ingredients:
    >
    > 12oz artichokes hearts, chopped
    > 1 cup mayonnaise
    > 1 small clove garlic, minced
    > 2 tablespoons oregano
    > 2 tablespoons grated onion
    > 2 cups Dubliner or Vintage Irish Cheddar Cheese, grated
    >
    >
    > Directions:
    >
    > Combine all ingredients and spoon the mixture into an 8 in. baking dish.
    > Bake for 30 minutes at 300░ F.
    >
    > Serve with crackers, pita bread or tortilla chips.
    >
    >
    > Michael



    Michael,

    Happy 4th of July!

    Except,

    I don't know squat about Dubliner or Vintage Irish cheddar cheese.

    Next, I'd rather use artichoke bottoms.

    And shouldn't the mayo be a measure of gloppiness or a WHOLE cup?


    We're BBQ (grilling) chicken, burgers and dogs again today (leftover BBQ'd
    chicken breakfast). Got a ton o' Samoan kids kickin' me when I'm up/when
    I'm down (I haven't struck back, yet!!!), they don't give a **** about our
    national holiday. It's just another day of summer to them.

    I tried to teach a class about birds. Failed miserably! KIDS!!! Attention
    span: -1 seconds. Then we wind up sleeping head to head in a circle?!?

    I do have a favorite student and wife who, nevermind. It's still nice to
    hear them all talking Samoan language. Makes me feel like I'm in their
    country, West Samoa NOT American Samoa. American Samoa sucks, they insist!
    And they don't fall like dominoes, so I just nod in agreement.

    Can't/don't wanna shake 'em out of their culture. I've seen that happen in
    Australia with the aborigines.

    Wouldn't mind a taste of your recipe, just don't think I'd make it myslef.

    Best,

    "Uncle" (torture HIM!!!) Andy

    Been purposely stepped on three times and strangled once during this post.
    This treatment, for being a thin and tall giant?!?

    Short and stout punks!!!

    CAN I GET A CAN O' WHIPASS (KID-SAFE)???

  6. #6
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip

    In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:

    >I don't know squat about Dubliner or Vintage Irish cheddar cheese.


    You don't shop at Trader Joe's?

    >Next, I'd rather use artichoke bottoms.


    In what way are they different than artichoke hearts?

    I am curious about recipes like this -- do you want to use
    canned, jarred, or frozen hearts, in oil or in water? Or
    does it make a difference?

    I like the idea of including a full 2 T of oregano.

    Steve

  7. #7
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip

    Steve Pope said...

    > In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:
    >
    >>I don't know squat about Dubliner or Vintage Irish cheddar cheese.

    >
    > You don't shop at Trader Joe's?
    >
    >>Next, I'd rather use artichoke bottoms.

    >
    > In what way are they different than artichoke hearts?
    >
    > I am curious about recipes like this -- do you want to use
    > canned, jarred, or frozen hearts, in oil or in water? Or
    > does it make a difference?
    >
    > I like the idea of including a full 2 T of oregano.
    >
    > Steve



    Steve,

    I was raised with artichoke hearts ("bottoms" in our house) being the
    remaining "heart" after all the leaves were gone and the choke scraped
    away. WAR at our kitchen table.

    The artichoke hearts you hear most about are some outer leaves plus the
    "bottom." I preferred what were the real hearts only. You have to carefully
    shop for artichoke "bottoms" (in a can) or do them yourself. "The heart is
    the best part," from how I was raised.

    Folks got funny tendencies, in places, imho.

    Andy

  8. #8
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip

    In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:

    >Steve Pope said...


    >> In what way are they different than artichoke hearts?


    >I was raised with artichoke hearts ("bottoms" in our house) being the
    >remaining "heart" after all the leaves were gone and the choke scraped
    >away. WAR at our kitchen table.


    >The artichoke hearts you hear most about are some outer leaves plus the
    >"bottom." I preferred what were the real hearts only. You have to carefully
    >shop for artichoke "bottoms" (in a can) or do them yourself. "The heart is
    >the best part," from how I was raised.


    Thanks, that makes sense....

    Steve

  9. #9
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip

    [email protected] (Steve Pope) news:g4li6p$dm2$[email protected]: in
    rec.food.cooking

    > In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:
    >
    >>I don't know squat about Dubliner or Vintage Irish cheddar cheese.

    >
    > You don't shop at Trader Joe's?
    >
    >>Next, I'd rather use artichoke bottoms.

    >
    > In what way are they different than artichoke hearts?
    >
    > I am curious about recipes like this -- do you want to use
    > canned, jarred, or frozen hearts, in oil or in water? Or
    > does it make a difference?
    >
    > I like the idea of including a full 2 T of oregano.


    I'm not Andy, but, for this kind of recipe I don't think it matter one
    way or another if you use the hearts or bottoms. They get chopped
    anyway. I either use the canned (drained) or the frozen (thawed). I've
    never used the jarred for this recipe. I don't think it matters much
    either way.

    Michael

    --
    Best license plate seen in a long time.

    ~ S CARGO ~

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  10. #10
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip

    Steve Pope said...

    > In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:
    >
    >>Steve Pope said...

    >
    >>> In what way are they different than artichoke hearts?

    >
    >>I was raised with artichoke hearts ("bottoms" in our house) being the
    >>remaining "heart" after all the leaves were gone and the choke scraped
    >>away. WAR at our kitchen table.

    >
    >>The artichoke hearts you hear most about are some outer leaves plus the
    >>"bottom." I preferred what were the real hearts only. You have to
    >>carefully shop for artichoke "bottoms" (in a can) or do them yourself.
    >>"The heart is the best part," from how I was raised.

    >
    > Thanks, that makes sense....
    >
    > Steve



    Steve,

    Welcome!

    Now put a little garlic'd sautÚd spinach and then a "real" heart "bottoms-
    up" on an English muffin, place a poached egg inside it and drown it in
    Hollandaise sauce and you'll have the best "Eggs Sardou" of your life. Do
    it twice and double your pleasure!

    Andy

  11. #11
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip

    Andy <q> news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    >
    > Michael,
    >
    > Happy 4th of July!


    Same back at ya'.

    >
    > Except,
    >
    > I don't know squat about Dubliner or Vintage Irish cheddar cheese.


    I don't know a lot about it either except that I've bought it a few times
    at the Wine and Cheese shop and I picked some up at TJ's once. It's good
    stuff but I want to know a lot more about Irish cheeses so I'm book
    shopping

    >
    > Next, I'd rather use artichoke bottoms.
    >
    > And shouldn't the mayo be a measure of gloppiness or a WHOLE cup?


    I think whatever floats your boat would be the way to go.


    <snip fun stuff about Andy and the samoan kids>

    > Wouldn't mind a taste of your recipe, just don't think I'd make it
    > myslef.
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > "Uncle" (torture HIM!!!) Andy
    >
    > Been purposely stepped on three times and strangled once during this
    > post. This treatment, for being a thin and tall giant?!?
    >
    > Short and stout punks!!!
    >
    > CAN I GET A CAN O' WHIPASS (KID-SAFE)???


    What in HELL are you doing? Camping out with a bunch of kids?

    Michael



    --
    Best license plate seen in a long time.

    ~ S CARGO ~

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  12. #12
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Dubliner Artichoke Dip

    Michael "Dog3" said...

    > Andy <q> news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking


    >> "Uncle" (torture HIM!!!) Andy
    >>
    >> Been purposely stepped on three times and strangled once during this
    >> post. This treatment, for being a thin and tall giant?!?
    >>
    >> Short and stout punks!!!
    >>
    >> CAN I GET A CAN O' WHIPASS (KID-SAFE)???

    >
    > What in HELL are you doing? Camping out with a bunch of kids?
    >
    > Michael



    Kinda/sorta. When the family comes over, they tend to stay over. It's a
    tight fit in such a small house. Most of us sleep on the living room floor.
    I tend to be an anchor. The kids stay up WAY TO LATE!!! Wears me out.

    Adults drink until dawn, yelling and screaming amongst themselves. Brothers
    and sisters 'n' stuff like that!!!

    Andy
    I snore. Payback!


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