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Thread: does it really Taste Better the next day?

  1. #1
    marco Guest

    Default does it really Taste Better the next day?

    I often read at the end of a recipe,
    or an opinion about a recipe,
    that a food dish tastes better the next day.

    I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    Not in all cases of course.

    I believe, that most of the time,
    it may be physiological [I think that's the word].

    For example, a cup of coffe,
    made the same way, can taste different,
    from day to day.

    The first time I tasted strawberry rhubarb pie,
    I couldn't belive how good it tasted.
    But later, after I had had it a few times,
    it just didn't live up to my expectations.

    marc

  2. #2
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    marco wrote:
    > I often read at the end of a recipe,
    > or an opinion about a recipe,
    > that a food dish tastes better the next day.
    >
    > I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    > Not in all cases of course.
    >
    > I believe, that most of the time,
    > it may be physiological [I think that's the word].
    >
    > For example, a cup of coffe,
    > made the same way, can taste different,
    > from day to day.
    >
    > The first time I tasted strawberry rhubarb pie,
    > I couldn't belive how good it tasted.
    > But later, after I had had it a few times,
    > it just didn't live up to my expectations.
    >
    > marc


    I don't think anyone says pies are better the next day. Soups,
    stews, and things like that are frequently better though.

    --
    Jean B.

  3. #3
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On 3/1/2012 2:08 PM, Jean B. wrote:
    > marco wrote:
    >> I often read at the end of a recipe, or an opinion about a recipe,
    >> that a food dish tastes better the next day.
    >>
    >> I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    >> Not in all cases of course.
    >>
    >> I believe, that most of the time,
    >> it may be physiological [I think that's the word].
    >>
    >> For example, a cup of coffe, made the same way, can taste different,
    >> from day to day.
    >>
    >> The first time I tasted strawberry rhubarb pie,
    >> I couldn't belive how good it tasted.
    >> But later, after I had had it a few times,
    >> it just didn't live up to my expectations.
    >>
    >> marc

    >
    > I don't think anyone says pies are better the next day. Soups, stews,
    > and things like that are frequently better though.
    >

    Cold blueberry and apple pies are excellent, IMHO and last several days
    in the fridge (unless I get to hear about them :-)

    --
    Jim Silverton

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

  4. #4
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?


    "marco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I often read at the end of a recipe,
    > or an opinion about a recipe,
    > that a food dish tastes better the next day.
    >
    > I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    > Not in all cases of course.
    >
    > I believe, that most of the time,
    > it may be physiological [I think that's the word].
    >

    The word you're looking for is psychological.

    > The first time I tasted strawberry rhubarb pie,
    > I couldn't belive how good it tasted.
    > But later, after I had had it a few times,
    > it just didn't live up to my expectations.
    >
    > marc


    I've never heard of pie allegedy tasting better the next day. Tomato sauce,
    stews, soups, sure. Sometimes when you give the ingredients a chance to
    blend, then yes, they taste better the next day. The recent chatter about
    macaroni & cheese prompts me to mention mac & cheese doesn't reheat well the
    next day. The cheese tends to break down. Then you're left with lightly
    flavoured and slighty greasy reheated macaroni. I've found that's true
    whether you use real cheddar or processed cheese. YMMV.

    Jill


  5. #5
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 09:40:58 -0800 (PST), marco <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I often read at the end of a recipe,
    >or an opinion about a recipe,
    >that a food dish tastes better the next day.
    >
    >I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    >Not in all cases of course.
    >
    >I believe, that most of the time,
    >it may be physiological [I think that's the word].
    >
    >For example, a cup of coffe,
    >made the same way, can taste different,
    >from day to day.
    >
    >The first time I tasted strawberry rhubarb pie,
    >I couldn't belive how good it tasted.
    >But later, after I had had it a few times,
    >it just didn't live up to my expectations.
    >
    >marc


    Across the board, I don't believe that anything tastes better the next
    day. Yuck! Any development of flavor that is necessary to enhance
    the dish can be achieved on the day that it is made. This is an old
    wives' tale meant to improve the image of leftovers.
    Janet US

  6. #6
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Thu, 01 Mar 2012 12:28:22 -0700, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 09:40:58 -0800 (PST), marco <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>I often read at the end of a recipe,
    >>or an opinion about a recipe,
    >>that a food dish tastes better the next day.
    >>
    >>I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    >>Not in all cases of course.
    >>
    >>I believe, that most of the time,
    >>it may be physiological [I think that's the word].
    >>
    >>For example, a cup of coffe,
    >>made the same way, can taste different,
    >>from day to day.
    >>
    >>The first time I tasted strawberry rhubarb pie,
    >>I couldn't belive how good it tasted.
    >>But later, after I had had it a few times,
    >>it just didn't live up to my expectations.
    >>
    >>marc

    >
    >Across the board, I don't believe that anything tastes better the next
    >day. Yuck! Any development of flavor that is necessary to enhance
    >the dish can be achieved on the day that it is made. This is an old
    >wives' tale meant to improve the image of leftovers.
    >Janet US


    I always knew that wine doesn't age in the bottle.... if anything wine
    deteriorates due to faulty bottling... wine ages like people, the
    older the more the stink.

  7. #7
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The recent chatter about
    > macaroni & cheese prompts me to mention mac & cheese doesn't reheat
    > well the next day. The cheese tends to break down. Then you're left
    > with lightly flavoured and slighty greasy reheated macaroni. I've
    > found that's true whether you use real cheddar or processed cheese.
    > YMMV.



    Mac'n'cheese reheats just fine. Somebody shared this magic a long time
    ago..

    Put the pot of remaining Mac'n'cheese over medium heat and add a
    tablespoon or two of water to it, stirring constantly. The Mac'n'cheese
    will quickly steam back to life.

    Any remainder can be re-refrigerated and the process repeated.

    I won't say it tastes better but as good as yesterday.

    Andy

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 09:40:58 -0800 (PST), marco <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I often read at the end of a recipe,
    > or an opinion about a recipe,
    > that a food dish tastes better the next day.
    >
    > I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    > Not in all cases of course.
    >
    > I believe, that most of the time,
    > it may be physiological [I think that's the word].
    >
    > For example, a cup of coffe,
    > made the same way, can taste different,
    > from day to day.


    I think they're talking about the way flavors have married in certain
    leftovers when you eat them the next day... not your daily cup of
    coffee.
    >
    > The first time I tasted strawberry rhubarb pie,
    > I couldn't belive how good it tasted.
    > But later, after I had had it a few times,
    > it just didn't live up to my expectations.
    >

    They aren't talking about separate instances of the same recipe. I've
    seen recipes that call for making it the day before and reheating it
    the following day to serve guests.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Thu, 01 Mar 2012 14:22:20 -0500, James Silverton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Cold blueberry and apple pies are excellent, IMHO and last several days
    > in the fridge (unless I get to hear about them :-)


    The crust often loses it's crispiness as the pies age.... IMO, of
    course.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Thu, 01 Mar 2012 12:28:22 -0700, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Across the board, I don't believe that anything tastes better the next
    > day. Yuck! Any development of flavor that is necessary to enhance
    > the dish can be achieved on the day that it is made. This is an old
    > wives' tale meant to improve the image of leftovers.


    I think (dried) bean dishes taste better the next day at least 80% of
    the time. The first time I really noticed it was the first time I
    made (my version of) cassoulet.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  11. #11
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 09:40:58 -0800 (PST), marco <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I often read at the end of a recipe,
    >or an opinion about a recipe,
    >that a food dish tastes better the next day.
    >
    >I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    >Not in all cases of course.

    ....

    My brother and I used to have a running argumebnt abouty chili. He
    said his chili was not finished until it took a ride through the
    freezer. He used to make large batches and freeze it before he'd eat
    any.

    I also used to make large batches of chili, and while I'd freeze most
    I'd always have a bowl of what I called "neuveau chili", which was
    after the cook finished but before it was frozen. And I discovered
    from doibng this that the "neuveau chili" had a sharper hotter flavor,
    which a ride through the freezer mellowed out.

    So yes there are differences. But to each their own, yano?

    John Kuthe...

  12. #12
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On 01/03/2012 12:40 PM, marco wrote:

    >
    > The first time I tasted strawberry rhubarb pie,
    > I couldn't belive how good it tasted.
    > But later, after I had had it a few times,
    > it just didn't live up to my expectations.
    >



    Sorry, but I like rhubarb pie too much to bastardize it with
    strawberries or any other fruit. AFAIAC, strawberry is the worst of all
    contaminants. I love fresh strawberries and other than jam, don't have
    much interest in cooked strawberries.


  13. #13
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On 01/03/2012 3:00 PM, sf wrote:

    >> The first time I tasted strawberry rhubarb pie,
    >> I couldn't belive how good it tasted.
    >> But later, after I had had it a few times,
    >> it just didn't live up to my expectations.
    >>

    > They aren't talking about separate instances of the same recipe. I've
    > seen recipes that call for making it the day before and reheating it
    > the following day to serve guests.



    There are some people who like pies warm out of the oven. Personally, I
    prefer them cold, and even better then next day.

  14. #14
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Mar 1, 9:40*am, marco <markph...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > I often read at the end of a recipe,
    > or an opinion about a recipe,
    > that a food dish tastes better the next day.
    >
    > I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    > Not in all cases of course.
    >
    > I believe, that most of the time,
    > it may be physiological [I think that's the word].
    >
    > For example, a cup of coffe,
    > made the same way, can taste different,
    > from day to day.
    >
    > The first time I tasted strawberry rhubarb pie,
    > I couldn't belive how good it tasted.
    > But later, after I had had it a few times,
    > it just didn't live up to my expectations.
    >
    > marc


    This is very subjective and depends entirely on what dish is being
    discussed.

    There are things like seared or broiled meats and fish that are not as
    good as leftovers and there are things like spaghetti sauces and
    lasagna that are even better the next day.

    It depends on the dish and how it is prepared. Some things are meant
    to be eaten entirely immediately after they are cooked, like chicken
    cutlets or veal scallopini. Stews, soups and some casseroles are
    actually more flavorful after they have had a chance to "meld" the
    flavors.


  15. #15
    marco Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    I think some of you are automatically responding,
    without really giving it much thought.

    My contention is, it's not the food,
    it's you/me that are in a different psychological
    state, and the food tastes different. Maybe better,
    but [again] it's not necessarily the food.

    We've all heard "it tastes better the next day"
    and sort of go along with it, and say it.
    Not many of you seem to be absorbing this idea,
    and responding to this concept.

    Sure, I could be totally wrong,
    but I'd like to follow through with this idea,
    and get thoughts on it, specifically.

    marc

  16. #16
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 13:18:32 -0800 (PST), marco <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I think some of you are automatically responding,
    >without really giving it much thought.
    >
    >My contention is, it's not the food,
    >it's you/me that are in a different psychological
    >state, and the food tastes different. Maybe better,
    >but [again] it's not necessarily the food.
    >
    >We've all heard "it tastes better the next day"
    >and sort of go along with it, and say it.
    >Not many of you seem to be absorbing this idea,
    >and responding to this concept.
    >
    >Sure, I could be totally wrong,
    >but I'd like to follow through with this idea,
    >and get thoughts on it, specifically.
    >
    >marc


    Another important aspect is after cooking a dish and being around the
    ingredients and their scents, one can become habituated to the
    subtlety of scents and flavors. So the next day when they are no
    longer habituated to them, those same scents and flavors can be
    perceived as more intense and complex.

    This is not "psychological", it is very real!

    John Kuthe...



  17. #17
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    In article <5649022.16.1330636712554.JavaMail.geo-discussion-
    forums@vblo18>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > I think some of you are automatically responding,
    > without really giving it much thought.
    >
    > My contention is, it's not the food,
    > it's you/me that are in a different psychological
    > state, and the food tastes different. Maybe better,
    > but [again] it's not necessarily the food.
    >
    > We've all heard "it tastes better the next day"
    > and sort of go along with it, and say it.
    > Not many of you seem to be absorbing this idea,
    > and responding to this concept.
    >
    > Sure, I could be totally wrong,
    > but I'd like to follow through with this idea,
    > and get thoughts on it, specifically.


    You're totally wrong. Happy now?

    Janet


  18. #18
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Mar 1, 2:10*pm, John Kuthe <JohnKu...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 09:40:58 -0800 (PST), marco <markph...@gmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I often read at the end of a recipe,
    > >or an opinion about a recipe,
    > >that a food dish tastes better the next day.

    >
    > >I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    > >Not in all cases of course.

    >
    > ...
    >
    > My brother and I used to have a running argumebnt abouty chili. He
    > said his chili was not finished until it took a ride through the
    > freezer. He used to make large batches and freeze it before he'd eat
    > any.
    >
    > I also used to make large batches of chili, and while I'd freeze most
    > I'd always have a bowl of what I called "neuveau chili", which was
    > after the cook finished but before it was frozen. And I discovered
    > from doibng this that the "neuveau chili" had a sharper hotter flavor,
    > which a ride through the freezer mellowed out.
    >
    > So yes there are differences. But to each their own, yano?


    Freezing the beans makes them softer, not freezing them leaves them
    firmer. That certainly is a matter of personal preference.
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    --Bryan

  19. #19
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 14:04:10 -0800 (PST), Bryan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mar 1, 2:10*pm, John Kuthe <JohnKu...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 09:40:58 -0800 (PST), marco <markph...@gmail.com>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >I often read at the end of a recipe,
    >> >or an opinion about a recipe,
    >> >that a food dish tastes better the next day.

    >>
    >> >I wonder if this is [many times] a fallacy?
    >> >Not in all cases of course.

    >>
    >> ...
    >>
    >> My brother and I used to have a running argumebnt abouty chili. He
    >> said his chili was not finished until it took a ride through the
    >> freezer. He used to make large batches and freeze it before he'd eat
    >> any.
    >>
    >> I also used to make large batches of chili, and while I'd freeze most
    >> I'd always have a bowl of what I called "neuveau chili", which was
    >> after the cook finished but before it was frozen. And I discovered
    >> from doibng this that the "neuveau chili" had a sharper hotter flavor,
    >> which a ride through the freezer mellowed out.
    >>
    >> So yes there are differences. But to each their own, yano?

    >
    >Freezing the beans makes them softer, not freezing them leaves them
    >firmer.


    How can that be... last time I checked frozen is harder than thawed.

  20. #20
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: does it really Taste Better the next day?

    On Thu, 1 Mar 2012 13:18:32 -0800 (PST), marco <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I think some of you are automatically responding,
    >without really giving it much thought.
    >
    >My contention is, it's not the food,
    >it's you/me that are in a different psychological
    >state, and the food tastes different. Maybe better,
    >but [again] it's not necessarily the food.


    i agree with you on ziti or lasagna. It is great fresh from the
    oven. But I'm tired then & it was a lot of work.

    The next day, cut a piece, nuke it, and gobble with my feet up. I
    like that experience better.

    On meatloaf, I'll disagree. my family like meatloaf. I can take
    it or leave it. But meatloaf sandwiches? Sign me up! Big
    couple of hunks of homemade bread-- 3/4" slice of meatloaf- 1/4" of
    sweet onion- a glob of mayo- a couple leaves of romaine. BBQ sauce
    or horseradish if I'm in the mood. Good for a week of lunches- and
    better [to me] than the meatloaf we had for supper.

    Stew gets better with time. Eat a little, add a little . . .

    Jim

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