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Thread: Doberge experiments

  1. #1
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Doberge experiments

    Several times I've attempted to produce the Louisiana special Doberge cake.
    It has several - as in 6 or 7 very skinny layers with a thin filling and
    then a frosting. Loaf size/shape. Yesterday's experiment was that I'd bake
    the cake in two loaf pans and split them into 3 layers each.
    That didn't work so well.
    Husband thinks it's a great cake but he'd enjoy a brick with sufficient
    fine chocolate frosting.
    I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of baking
    thin and Edible cake layers? Polly


  2. #2
    Christopher M. Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Several times I've attempted to produce the Louisiana special Doberge
    > cake. It has several - as in 6 or 7 very skinny layers with a thin filling
    > and then a frosting. Loaf size/shape. Yesterday's experiment was that
    > I'd bake the cake in two loaf pans and split them into 3 layers each.
    > That didn't work so well.
    > Husband thinks it's a great cake but he'd enjoy a brick with sufficient
    > fine chocolate frosting.
    > I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of baking
    > thin and Edible cake layers? Polly


    There's a new slicing tool. It works pretty well. It's a horizontal cake
    cutter w/serrated stainless steel wires.

    I pretty much hold it still in front of me and shimmy the cake through from
    the side.

    Measuring the height is a little tricky. Maybe practice on something first.
    http://www.google.com/products/catal...=0CJEBEPMCMAE#


    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)



  3. #3
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On Mar 20, 7:32*pm, "Polly Esther" <Polly...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > Several times I've attempted to produce the Louisiana special Doberge cake.
    > It has several - as in 6 or 7 very skinny layers with a thin filling and
    > then a frosting. *Loaf size/shape. *Yesterday's experiment was that I'd bake
    > the cake in two loaf pans and split them into 3 layers each.
    > * * That didn't work so well.
    > * * Husband thinks it's a great cake but he'd enjoy a brick with sufficient
    > fine chocolate frosting.
    > * * I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of baking
    > thin and Edible cake layers? * Polly


    It's more of cutting them after they are baked instead of trying to
    bake thin cakes. I have not seen your recipe, but IMO,
    Slightly freeze your layers. Are you able to split one in half w/ a
    turntable? If not, have you tried the toothpick method for dividing a
    cake? I can split a 2.5" high cake into 4 layers, maybe 5 depending on
    the cake.

  4. #4
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 20:08:46 -0700 (PDT), merryb <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Mar 20, 7:32*pm, "Polly Esther" <Polly...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >> Several times I've attempted to produce the Louisiana special Doberge cake.
    >> It has several - as in 6 or 7 very skinny layers with a thin filling and
    >> then a frosting. *Loaf size/shape. *Yesterday's experiment was that I'd bake
    >> the cake in two loaf pans and split them into 3 layers each.
    >> * * That didn't work so well.
    >> * * Husband thinks it's a great cake but he'd enjoy a brick with sufficient
    >> fine chocolate frosting.
    >> * * I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of baking
    >> thin and Edible cake layers? * Polly

    >
    >It's more of cutting them after they are baked instead of trying to
    >bake thin cakes. I have not seen your recipe, but IMO,
    >Slightly freeze your layers. Are you able to split one in half w/ a
    >turntable? If not, have you tried the toothpick method for dividing a
    >cake? I can split a 2.5" high cake into 4 layers, maybe 5 depending on
    >the cake.


    Well..Deb from Smitten Kitchen has made Dobos torte..and she posted
    about it... It may be a variation of the cake you have tried.. She
    makes really thin layers.
    http://smittenkitchen.com/2011/06/dobos-torte/

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On Tue, 20 Mar 2012 21:32:53 -0500, "Polly Esther"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Several times I've attempted to produce the Louisiana special Doberge cake.
    > It has several - as in 6 or 7 very skinny layers with a thin filling and
    > then a frosting. Loaf size/shape. Yesterday's experiment was that I'd bake
    > the cake in two loaf pans and split them into 3 layers each.
    > That didn't work so well.
    > Husband thinks it's a great cake but he'd enjoy a brick with sufficient
    > fine chocolate frosting.
    > I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of baking
    > thin and Edible cake layers? Polly


    Talk to zz who posted about some gawd awful potluck dish concoction.
    S/he might have some tips for you.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  6. #6
    z z Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    I enjoyed smittenkitchen.com and picked up interesting ideas. I like how
    she baked thin puddle layers of cake on parchment and then constructed
    her torte after trimming to the desired shapes-you could make an awesome
    heart torte for Valentines Day.

    Even better though was the ideas for pancakes torte and crepes torte.

    Which led me to thinking about a waffles torte? Crispy waffles, stacked,
    with a divine fruit filling (or how about nuts or even almond paste)
    filling the hollows sealed in by layer of frosting??

    We are too young to be old and stodgy :-)


  7. #7
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On 2012-03-21, Christopher M. <[email protected]> wrote:

    > There's a new slicing tool. It works pretty well. It's a horizontal cake
    > cutter w/serrated stainless steel wires.


    Sounds like gimmicky overkill, to me. Jes wrap some dental floss
    around each layer, so the floss sits dead center in the middle of the
    sides of the layer. Pull tight!

    nb


    --
    Fight internet CENSORSHIP - Fight SOPA-PIPA
    Contact your congressman and/or representative, now!
    http://projects.propublica.org/sopa/
    vi --the heart of evil!

  8. #8
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On Mar 20, 7:32*pm, "Polly Esther" <Polly...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > Several times I've attempted to produce the Louisiana special Doberge cake.
    > It has several - as in 6 or 7 very skinny layers with a thin filling and
    > then a frosting. *Loaf size/shape. *Yesterday's experiment was that I'd bake
    > the cake in two loaf pans and split them into 3 layers each.
    > * * That didn't work so well.
    > * * Husband thinks it's a great cake but he'd enjoy a brick with sufficient
    > fine chocolate frosting.
    > * * I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of baking
    > thin and Edible cake layers? * Polly


    Polly, here's a great history of the cake in New Orleans. There is
    also a recipe and methodologyl
    http://sugaredblog.blogspot.com/2009...erge-cake.html

  9. #9
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (z z) wrote:

    > I enjoyed smittenkitchen.com and picked up interesting ideas. I like how
    > she baked thin puddle layers of cake on parchment and then constructed
    > her torte after trimming to the desired shapes-you could make an awesome
    > heart torte for Valentines Day.


    > We are too young to be old and stodgy :-)


    You are never too young to be old and stodgy! I think I was born that
    way.

    :-)

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  10. #10
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On Mar 21, 2:12*am, angie-...@webtv.net (z z) wrote:
    > I enjoyed smittenkitchen.com and picked up interesting ideas. I like how
    > she baked thin puddle layers of cake on parchment and then constructed
    > her torte after trimming to the desired shapes-you could make an awesome
    > heart torte for Valentines Day.
    >
    > Even better though was the ideas for pancakes torte and crepes torte.
    >
    > Which led me to thinking about a waffles torte? Crispy waffles, stacked,
    > with a divine fruit filling (or how about nuts or even almond paste)
    > filling the hollows sealed in by layer of frosting??
    >
    > We are too young to be old and stodgy :-)


    How about crepes layered with lemon curd? I have made that before- yum!

  11. #11
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments


    "ImStillMags" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Mar 20, 7:32 pm, "Polly Esther" <Polly...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > Several times I've attempted to produce the Louisiana special Doberge
    > cake.
    > It has several - as in 6 or 7 very skinny layers with a thin filling and
    > then a frosting. Loaf size/shape. Yesterday's experiment was that I'd bake
    > the cake in two loaf pans and split them into 3 layers each.
    > That didn't work so well.
    > Husband thinks it's a great cake but he'd enjoy a brick with sufficient
    > fine chocolate frosting.
    > I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of baking
    > thin and Edible cake layers? Polly


    Polly, here's a great history of the cake in New Orleans. There is
    also a recipe and methodologyl
    http://sugaredblog.blogspot.com/2009...erge-cake.html

    Well WOW and thank you so much. I was very curious how doberge in New
    Orleans came from Hungary and dobos. Now we are all smarter. Plus, there
    wasn't anyway I could bake a 10 egg cake. Well, I could but only after
    making reservations at the nearest cardiac unit. The New Orleans recipe is
    quite a bit safer. Polly


  12. #12
    Christopher M. Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    ImStillMags wrote:
    > On Mar 20, 7:32 pm, "Polly Esther" <Polly...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >> Several times I've attempted to produce the Louisiana special
    >> Doberge cake. It has several - as in 6 or 7 very skinny layers with
    >> a thin filling and then a frosting. Loaf size/shape. Yesterday's
    >> experiment was that I'd bake the cake in two loaf pans and split
    >> them into 3 layers each.
    >> That didn't work so well.
    >> Husband thinks it's a great cake but he'd enjoy a brick with
    >> sufficient fine chocolate frosting.
    >> I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of
    >> baking thin and Edible cake layers? Polly

    >
    > Polly, here's a great history of the cake in New Orleans. There is
    > also a recipe and methodologyl
    > http://sugaredblog.blogspot.com/2009...erge-cake.html


    This recipes is a little unusual. Melted chocolate is added to the cake
    batter in this recipe.


    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)



  13. #13
    Christopher M. Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    ImStillMags wrote:
    > On Mar 20, 7:32 pm, "Polly Esther" <Polly...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >> Several times I've attempted to produce the Louisiana special
    >> Doberge cake. It has several - as in 6 or 7 very skinny layers with
    >> a thin filling and then a frosting. Loaf size/shape. Yesterday's
    >> experiment was that I'd bake the cake in two loaf pans and split
    >> them into 3 layers each.
    >> That didn't work so well.
    >> Husband thinks it's a great cake but he'd enjoy a brick with
    >> sufficient fine chocolate frosting.
    >> I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of
    >> baking thin and Edible cake layers? Polly

    >
    > Polly, here's a great history of the cake in New Orleans. There is
    > also a recipe and methodologyl
    > http://sugaredblog.blogspot.com/2009...erge-cake.html


    Some of the comments on this page might be helpful. When melted chocolate is
    added to the cake batter, it's more of a European style of Doberge cake, not
    a New Orleans style Doberge cake.
    http://www.food.com/recipe/chocolate...-182992/review


    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)



  14. #14
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On 3/21/2012 8:15 AM, notbob wrote:
    > On 2012-03-21, Christopher M.<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> There's a new slicing tool. It works pretty well. It's a horizontal cake
    >> cutter w/serrated stainless steel wires.

    >
    > Sounds like gimmicky overkill, to me. Jes wrap some dental floss
    > around each layer, so the floss sits dead center in the middle of the
    > sides of the layer. Pull tight!



    The horizontal wire cake slicer is not new. I've had one for a few years
    and it does work as long as you've got absolutely level and steady
    surfaces to work on. I've tried the slicing with floss trick before with
    little success--it works only if the cake holds still, the floss doesn't
    shift out of position or drag, and it doesn't hit that particular spot
    that exists in every cake that defies cutting/slicing/etc. without
    crumbling or pulling apart. Better results have been achieved with
    ordinary sewing thread, primarily because it's much finer and creates a
    cutting edge with greater force.


  15. #15
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 18:40:06 -0600, Pennyaline
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 3/21/2012 8:15 AM, notbob wrote:
    >> On 2012-03-21, Christopher M.<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> There's a new slicing tool. It works pretty well. It's a horizontal cake
    >>> cutter w/serrated stainless steel wires.

    >>
    >> Sounds like gimmicky overkill, to me. Jes wrap some dental floss
    >> around each layer, so the floss sits dead center in the middle of the
    >> sides of the layer. Pull tight!

    >
    >
    >The horizontal wire cake slicer is not new. I've had one for a few years
    >and it does work as long as you've got absolutely level and steady
    >surfaces to work on. I've tried the slicing with floss trick before with
    >little success--it works only if the cake holds still, the floss doesn't
    >shift out of position or drag, and it doesn't hit that particular spot
    >that exists in every cake that defies cutting/slicing/etc. without
    >crumbling or pulling apart. Better results have been achieved with
    >ordinary sewing thread, primarily because it's much finer and creates a
    >cutting edge with greater force.


    This is all a lotta BS... professional bakers slice cake with a
    scalloped bread knife blade... and for extra precision they rest the
    blade accross a couple of wooden dowels as a guide. I've never seen
    any baker use wire/dental floss for slicing, that's gotta be an
    idiotic foodtv trick.

  16. #16
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On 3/21/2012 7:55 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 18:40:06 -0600, Pennyaline
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 3/21/2012 8:15 AM, notbob wrote:
    >>> On 2012-03-21, Christopher M.<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> There's a new slicing tool. It works pretty well. It's a horizontal cake
    >>>> cutter w/serrated stainless steel wires.
    >>>
    >>> Sounds like gimmicky overkill, to me. Jes wrap some dental floss
    >>> around each layer, so the floss sits dead center in the middle of the
    >>> sides of the layer. Pull tight!

    >>
    >>
    >> The horizontal wire cake slicer is not new. I've had one for a few years
    >> and it does work as long as you've got absolutely level and steady
    >> surfaces to work on. I've tried the slicing with floss trick before with
    >> little success--it works only if the cake holds still, the floss doesn't
    >> shift out of position or drag, and it doesn't hit that particular spot
    >> that exists in every cake that defies cutting/slicing/etc. without
    >> crumbling or pulling apart. Better results have been achieved with
    >> ordinary sewing thread, primarily because it's much finer and creates a
    >> cutting edge with greater force.

    >
    > This is all a lotta BS... professional bakers slice cake with a
    > scalloped bread knife blade... and for extra precision they rest the
    > blade accross a couple of wooden dowels as a guide. I've never seen
    > any baker use wire/dental floss for slicing, that's gotta be an
    > idiotic foodtv trick.


    I've done the serrated knife resting on blocks, too. Nice, as long as
    nobody takes your blocks in between cakes! In my younger, steady-handed
    days, I could halve a cake layer freehand--those days are long gone. The
    wire cake slicer jobby does work, as does the thread trick. My wire
    cutter is from Wilton and I don't think anybody here ever said that
    professional bakers use it.

  17. #17
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On Mar 21, 6:55*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 18:40:06 -0600, Pennyaline
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <norwegianb...@beatifulplummage.innit> wrote:
    > >On 3/21/2012 8:15 AM, notbob wrote:
    > >> On 2012-03-21, Christopher M.<nospam_flibb...@floo.com> *wrote:

    >
    > >>> There's a new slicing tool. It works pretty well. It's a horizontal cake
    > >>> cutter w/serrated stainless steel wires.

    >
    > >> Sounds like gimmicky overkill, to me. *Jes wrap some dental floss
    > >> around each layer, so the floss sits dead center in the middle of the
    > >> sides of the layer. *Pull tight!

    >
    > >The horizontal wire cake slicer is not new. I've had one for a few years
    > >and it does work as long as you've got absolutely level and steady
    > >surfaces to work on. I've tried the slicing with floss trick before with
    > >little success--it works only if the cake holds still, the floss doesn't
    > >shift out of position or drag, and it doesn't hit that particular spot
    > >that exists in every cake that defies cutting/slicing/etc. without
    > >crumbling or pulling apart. Better results have been achieved with
    > >ordinary sewing thread, primarily because it's much finer and creates a
    > >cutting edge with greater force.

    >
    > This is all a lotta BS... professional bakers slice cake with a
    > scalloped bread knife blade... and for extra precision they rest the
    > blade accross a couple of wooden dowels as a guide. *I've never seen
    > any baker use wire/dental floss for slicing, that's gotta be an
    > idiotic foodtv trick.


    You can see an Agbay (or similar horizontal cake slicer) in the
    background of the picture on the SugarEd blog. Here's the Agbay
    website:

    http://www.agbayproducts.com/

  18. #18
    RussianFoodDire Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments


    It is an old tool. Bakers slice cake with a
    scalloped bread knife blade. I have never seen any professional baker
    using wire.




    --
    RussianFoodDire

  19. #19
    Hell Toupee Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On 3/20/2012 9:32 PM, Polly Esther wrote:
    > Several times I've attempted to produce the Louisiana special Doberge
    > cake. It has several - as in 6 or 7 very skinny layers with a thin
    > filling and then a frosting. Loaf size/shape. Yesterday's experiment
    > was that I'd bake the cake in two loaf pans and split them into 3
    > layers each.
    > That didn't work so well.
    > Husband thinks it's a great cake but he'd enjoy a brick with
    > sufficient fine chocolate frosting.
    > I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of
    > baking thin and Edible cake layers? Polly


    I make a sixteen-layer chocolate almond truffle torte, and I bake the
    layers separately. I have four 9-inch cake pans with removable
    bottoms. I use parchment circles, pour in the allotment of batter, and
    bake four layers at a time. Remove from oven, remove bottoms, slide
    parchment/cake layer onto rack. Repeat three more times. It sounds
    like more work but it goes really fast. Plus, if I want to freeze the
    layers, they're already on the parchment, so they can be safely
    stacked within a cake pan and frozen until I'm ready to assemble it.

  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Doberge experiments

    On Thu, 22 Mar 2012 10:54:44 -0500, Hell Toupee <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On 3/20/2012 9:32 PM, Polly Esther wrote:
    > >
    > > I wonder if there's anyone here who's conquered the technique of
    > > baking thin and Edible cake layers? Polly

    >
    > I make a sixteen-layer chocolate almond truffle torte, and I bake the
    > layers separately. I have four 9-inch cake pans with removable
    > bottoms. I use parchment circles, pour in the allotment of batter, and
    > bake four layers at a time. Remove from oven, remove bottoms, slide
    > parchment/cake layer onto rack. Repeat three more times. It sounds
    > like more work but it goes really fast. Plus, if I want to freeze the
    > layers, they're already on the parchment, so they can be safely
    > stacked within a cake pan and frozen until I'm ready to assemble it.


    That's interesting: premade skinny layers. Do you use two pieces of
    parchment or one between the layers and how do you deal with the
    edges? Chocolate almond truffle tort sounded tasty, so I looked for a
    recipe and came up with something the size of what I'd want to make
    and it's gluten free too. http://uktv.co.uk/food/recipe/aid/641357
    Thanks for the idea!

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

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