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Thread: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?

  1. #1
    cfc Guest

    Default Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of minced
    beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion
    [image:
    http://lh6.ggpht.com/_jR3feX8uQjw/S7..._cevapi_v.jpg]
    [image:
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_jR3feX8uQjw/S7...hE/cevapi.jpg]
    [image:
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_jR3feX8uQjw/S7...cevapcici.jpg]
    Ingredients

    350g Premium Grade Minced Beef
    150g minced lamb
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    50g onion, minced
    40ml natural mineral water
    20ml oil
    hot chili to taste (optional)
    pepper to taste
    salt

    Method:

    1. Combine well all ingredients for Ćevapcici. Refrigerate
    mixture over night.
    2. Wet hands with water and shape the mixture into uniform rolls.
    3. Cook the Ćevapcici on a hot lightly oiled barbecue grill or
    frypan for 6-10 minutes, turning frequently.
    4. Ćevapcici can be served on its own or between slices of flat
    bread.




    --
    cfc

  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?

    On Fri 02 Apr 2010 01:24:31p, cfc told us...

    >
    > One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of minced
    > beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion
    > [image:
    > http://lh6.ggpht.com/_jR3feX8uQjw/S7...cwJUZ1jKdo/sl4
    > _cevapi_v.jpg] [image:
    > http://lh5.ggpht.com/_jR3feX8uQjw/S7...QB1iuic3hE/cev
    > api.jpg] [image:
    > http://lh5.ggpht.com/_jR3feX8uQjw/S7...RNFmHD-nN0/cev
    > apcici.jpg] Ingredients
    >
    > 350g Premium Grade Minced Beef
    > 150g minced lamb
    > 2 garlic cloves, minced
    > 50g onion, minced
    > 40ml natural mineral water
    > 20ml oil
    > hot chili to taste (optional)
    > pepper to taste
    > salt
    >
    > Method:
    >
    > 1. Combine well all ingredients for Ćevapcici. Refrigerate
    > mixture over night.
    > 2. Wet hands with water and shape the mixture into uniform rolls.
    > 3. Cook the Ćevapcici on a hot lightly oiled barbecue grill or
    > frypan for 6-10 minutes, turning frequently.
    > 4. Ćevapcici can be served on its own or between slices of flat
    > bread.



    They look and sound good!



    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  3. #3
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    "cfc" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of minced>
    > beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion


    YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post from Europe, so I
    don't usually see them.

    Hey! That's a European recipe!



  4. #4
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    "Giusi" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > "cfc" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of minced>
    >> beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion

    >
    > YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post from Europe, so I
    > don't usually see them.
    >

    Slovenian & other Slavic languages.

    > Hey! That's a European recipe!

    Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner


  5. #5
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?

    Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:00:19 +0200:


    > "Giusi" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> "cfc" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel
    >> messaggio
    >>> One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of
    >>> minced> beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion

    >>
    >> YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post from
    >> Europe, so I don't usually see them.
    >>

    > Slovenian & other Slavic languages.


    >> Hey! That's a European recipe!

    > Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...


    Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe and, altho'
    the Balkans have been influenced by many other countries, they are
    closer to Brussels than Greece.



    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  6. #6
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    "James Silverton" schrieb :
    > Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:00:19 +0200:
    >
    >
    >> "Giusi" <[email protected]> schrieb :
    >>>
    >>> "cfc" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel
    >>> messaggio
    >>>> One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of
    >>>> minced> beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion
    >>>
    >>> YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post from
    >>> Europe, so I don't usually see them.
    >>>

    >> Slovenian & other Slavic languages.

    >
    >>> Hey! That's a European recipe!

    >> Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...

    >
    > Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe and, altho'
    > the Balkans have been influenced by many other countries, they are
    > closer to Brussels than Greece.
    >

    It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at Yugoslavian
    civil war ...

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner


  7. #7
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?

    James Silverton wrote:
    >
    >>> Hey! That's a European recipe!

    >> Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...

    >
    > Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe and, altho'
    > the Balkans have been influenced by many other countries, they are
    > closer to Brussels than Greece.
    >



    Whether or not the Balkans are in Europe is a question that only the
    geographically challenged would ask. They most definitely are.

    As for the food... there was a Macedonian restaurant in our little town
    for a while. We were there once. I was expecting the food to be
    something like Greek food. It wasn't. It wasn't very good at all. We
    never went back, and never recommended it to anyone. It only lasted a
    few months.


  8. #8
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?

    Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 14:44:26 +0200:


    > "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:00:19 +0200:
    >>
    >>> "Giusi" <[email protected]> schrieb :
    >>>>
    >>>> "cfc" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel
    >>>> messaggio
    >>>>> One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of
    >>>> minced>> beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion
    >>>>
    >>>> YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post from
    >>>> Europe, so I don't usually see them.
    >>>>
    >>> Slovenian & other Slavic languages.

    >>
    >>>> Hey! That's a European recipe!
    >>> Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...

    >>
    >> Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe
    >> and, altho' the Balkans have been influenced by many other
    >> countries, they are closer to Brussels than Greece.
    >>

    > It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at
    > Yugoslavian civil war ...


    That's a dangerous argument. Think of Germany/Austria in the 1930s and
    40s.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  9. #9
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?

    James Silverton wrote:

    >>>
    >>> Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe
    >>> and, altho' the Balkans have been influenced by many other
    >>> countries, they are closer to Brussels than Greece.
    >>>

    >> It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at
    >> Yugoslavian civil war ...

    >
    > That's a dangerous argument. Think of Germany/Austria in the 1930s and 40s.


    Think of the Balkans as being part of the Austro Hungarian Empire until
    the end of WW I.

  10. #10
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    "James Silverton" schrieb :
    > Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 14:44:26 +0200:
    >
    >
    >> "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >>> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:00:19 +0200:
    >>>
    >>>> "Giusi" <[email protected]> schrieb :
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "cfc" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel
    >>>>> messaggio
    >>>>>> One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of
    >>>>> minced>> beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion
    >>>>>
    >>>>> YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post from
    >>>>> Europe, so I don't usually see them.
    >>>>>
    >>>> Slovenian & other Slavic languages.
    >>>
    >>>>> Hey! That's a European recipe!
    >>>> Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...
    >>>
    >>> Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe
    >>> and, altho' the Balkans have been influenced by many other
    >>> countries, they are closer to Brussels than Greece.
    >>>

    >> It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at
    >> Yugoslavian civil war ...

    >
    > That's a dangerous argument. Think of Germany/Austria in the 1930s and
    > 40s.
    >

    (a) it isn't an argument, I was pointing out that those are muddy waters
    (and have been for a very long time).
    (b) If you want to make a point about Austria/Germany, you should do so.
    I have no clue what you're trying to say.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner


  11. #11
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?

    Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 16:10:55 +0200:


    > "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 14:44:26 +0200:
    >>
    >>> "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >>>> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:00:19 +0200:
    >>>>
    >>>>> "Giusi" <[email protected]> schrieb :
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "cfc" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel
    >>>>>> messaggio
    >>>>>>> One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of
    >>>>> minced>>> beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post
    >>>>>> from Europe, so I don't usually see them.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> Slovenian & other Slavic languages.
    >>>>
    >>>>>> Hey! That's a European recipe!
    >>>>> Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...
    >>>>
    >>>> Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe
    >>>> and, altho' the Balkans have been influenced by many other
    >>>> countries, they are closer to Brussels than Greece.
    >>>>
    >>> It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at
    >>> Yugoslavian civil war ...

    >>
    >> That's a dangerous argument. Think of Germany/Austria in the 1930s
    >> and 40s.
    >>

    > (a) it isn't an argument, I was pointing out that those are
    > muddy waters (and have been for a very long time).
    > (b) If you want to make a point about Austria/Germany, you
    > should do so. I have no clue what you're trying to say.


    It is totally unnecessary to describe the mentality of the adults of
    Germany/Austria during WWII. While now practically all the Nazis are
    dead, genocide is hardly to be described as a qualification for
    membership in Europe.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  12. #12
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    "James Silverton" schrieb :
    > Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 16:10:55 +0200:
    >
    >
    >> "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >>> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 14:44:26 +0200:
    >>>
    >>>> "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >>>>> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:00:19 +0200:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> "Giusi" <[email protected]> schrieb :
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "cfc" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel
    >>>>>>> messaggio
    >>>>>>>> One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of
    >>>>>> minced>>> beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post
    >>>>>>> from Europe, so I don't usually see them.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> Slovenian & other Slavic languages.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>> Hey! That's a European recipe!
    >>>>>> Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe
    >>>>> and, altho' the Balkans have been influenced by many other
    >>>>> countries, they are closer to Brussels than Greece.
    >>>>>
    >>>> It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at
    >>>> Yugoslavian civil war ...
    >>>
    >>> That's a dangerous argument. Think of Germany/Austria in the 1930s
    >>> and 40s.
    >>>

    >> (a) it isn't an argument, I was pointing out that those are
    >> muddy waters (and have been for a very long time).
    >> (b) If you want to make a point about Austria/Germany, you
    >> should do so. I have no clue what you're trying to say.

    >
    > It is totally unnecessary to describe the mentality of the adults of
    > Germany/Austria during WWII. While now practically all the Nazis are
    > dead, genocide is hardly to be described as a qualification for
    > membership in Europe.
    >

    You know that Austria was annexed in 1938 ? No, propably not.
    You know that the NSDAP was illegal in Austria until Schuschnigg caved
    in after Mussolini made his pact with Hitler ? No, propably not.
    You know that the Austrian Nazis were shot when they tried an armed
    take-over of the state ? No, propably not.

    Please don't try to lecture about things you don't have a clue about.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner

    And a little PS : Only one 33 percent of the Germans voted for Hitler.




  13. #13
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?

    Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 16:55:49 +0200:


    > "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 16:10:55 +0200:
    >>
    >>> "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >>>> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 14:44:26 +0200:
    >>>>
    >>>>> "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >>>>>> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:00:19 +0200:
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>> "Giusi" <[email protected]> schrieb :
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> "cfc" <[email protected]> ha scritto
    >>>>>>>> nel messaggio
    >>>>>>>>> One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled
    >>>>>>>>> rolls of
    >>>>>> minced>>>> beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post
    >>>>>>>> from Europe, so I don't usually see them.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> Slovenian & other Slavic languages.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Hey! That's a European recipe!
    >>>>>>> Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in
    >>>>>> Europe and, altho' the Balkans have been influenced by
    >>>>>> many other countries, they are closer to Brussels than
    >>>>>> Greece.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>> It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at
    >>>>> Yugoslavian civil war ...
    >>>>
    >>>> That's a dangerous argument. Think of Germany/Austria in
    >>>> the 1930s and 40s.
    >>>>
    >>> (a) it isn't an argument, I was pointing out that those are
    >>> muddy waters (and have been for a very long time).
    >>> (b) If you want to make a point about Austria/Germany, you
    >>> should do so. I have no clue what you're trying to say.

    >>
    >> It is totally unnecessary to describe the mentality of the
    >> adults of Germany/Austria during WWII. While now practically all the
    >> Nazis are dead, genocide is hardly to be described as
    >> a qualification for membership in Europe.
    >>

    > You know that Austria was annexed in 1938 ? No, propably not.
    > You know that the NSDAP was illegal in Austria until
    > Schuschnigg caved in after Mussolini made his pact with Hitler
    > ? No, propably not. You know that the Austrian Nazis were shot
    > when they tried an armed take-over of the state ? No, propably
    > not.


    That is the version of history which many Austrians like to believe.
    There are numerous pictures of happy cheering Austrians during the
    so-called Anchluss.

    For some see http://www.thirdreichruins.com/austria.htm

    I have long been impressed by this post in rec.travel.europe.

    From - Wed Jan 07 23:00:19 1998
    From: [email protected] (Frank)
    Newsgroups: rec.travel.europe
    Subject: Re: Nazis in Europe………..
    Date: Mon, 05 Jan 1998 17:32:58 GMT

    This has the original spelling, punctuation apart from obvious glitches,
    etc. (JVS)


    Let me tell you about the forcible takeover of Austria by Germany. I was
    Austrian born, deeply catholic and nationalistic minded. My father
    worked at the post office in Vienna. I was 17 years old in 1938 when the
    events of the Anschluss took place . All around me, as well my parents
    as our friends as all the neighborhood were totally supporting the
    Schuschnig government and as this didn't give us the expected
    satisfaction , most of the people (certainly 3/4) turned to this new
    man, Seyss-Inquart, extreme populist right wing admirer of Hitler. I
    remember him well. I saw him on several propaganda meetings where my
    father took me. A virulent antisemite, for whom only the nazi german
    example was the road to follow.

    The day of March 11 1938 I will never forget. In the morning the word
    spread around that 200.000 german soldiers were massed at the border,
    ready to march into Austria. We all went out in the streets, shouting
    enthusiaticly,. The crowd denses more and more. Comments like "it's high
    time we sweep this country clean from jews and communists" are heard all
    around. People are waiting, waiting, and walking on the Ring. The
    Deutsch Reichsbahn office situated on the ground floor of the Bristol
    hotel displays a huge portrait of Hitler. I remember clearly how huge
    crowds laid down immense flower bouquets under the portrait.

    When the police orders people to move and disperse, they shout "death to
    Schusschnig! death to the Jews! One people, one Reich, one Fuhrer!"

    I was 17 and had my own opinions, which were not especially pro jewish,
    but all this hatred disgusted me a little. Nevertheless I hid this
    feelings safely; my courage was not suicidal at that moment! The
    situation became more and more chaotic with the hour. Nazi sympathisants
    blocked all streets and started to collect money on the Neuermarkt,
    Tegethoffstraase, around the Opera. Police remained passive. Soon S.A.
    and S.S. Austrians in UNIFORM (Yes) patrolled together with the common
    police. I didn't realise then what this meant, I do now. .

    The next day March 12 1938 we woke up with the noise of German planes
    flying over Vienna. It were bombers unloading masses of tracts and
    leaflets where you could read "National Socialist Germany salutes and
    greets his new territory, National Socialist Austria and his new
    government in a sincere and indissociable unity." We hear the whole show
    on the radio: at sunrise the frontier barriers are opened without a
    gunshot and the infantery of the 8th army marches in. At 9 am general
    Veiel pushes his 5th and 7th armoured bataljon through Linz and
    St.Polten. At 9.12 am precisely general Guderian crosses over with the
    gross of his Panzerdivision. Finally, the Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler
    closes the first wave. Not a gun shot, not a resistance whatsoever.
    Grosses victory for the Reich who merely marries a long promised bride.
    I heard later from relatives living on the passages of the "invaders"
    (?) they were received by the people along the roads with tears of joy,
    offered gifts, chocolats, bonbons. Tanks are buried under thousands of
    flowers.

    Enough of all that. My parents lived unharmed through the war, so did I.
    I developped a conscience growing older and am still shocked that my
    country posed as a victim of Nazi Germany. That's not what I saw. I
    emigrated in 1948 to Chicago and live there happily since. I returned a
    few times to Austria, homesick as you can imgine. Vienna is still a
    tremendous beautiful city, the country is still overwhelming with
    breathtaking sceneries, walder, meeren, bergen. But damn, damn, people
    didn't change much. Still the exterior freundlichkeit and the inner
    distrust and jealousy of the stranger and the eternal devil, bearer of
    all misery, the Jew, remains. I'm 78 now and I'm kind of glad I didn't
    stick around after the war, as an Austrian I couldnt look people in the
    eyes without a deep shame, that's my character, nothing can change that.

    Frank Keheler




    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  14. #14
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?

    On Sat, 3 Apr 2010 14:44:26 +0200, Michael Kuettner wrote:

    > "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:00:19 +0200:
    >>
    >>> "Giusi" <[email protected]> schrieb :
    >>>>
    >>>> "cfc" <cfc.5fc56d[email protected]> ha scritto nel
    >>>> messaggio
    >>>>> One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of
    >>>>> minced> beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion
    >>>>
    >>>> YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post from
    >>>> Europe, so I don't usually see them.
    >>>>
    >>> Slovenian & other Slavic languages.

    >>
    >>>> Hey! That's a European recipe!
    >>> Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...

    >>
    >> Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe and, altho'
    >> the Balkans have been influenced by many other countries, they are
    >> closer to Brussels than Greece.
    >>

    > It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at Yugoslavian
    > civil war ...
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Michael Kuettner


    i thought it was a question of whiteness...

    your pal,
    blake

  15. #15
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    "Michael Kuettner" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio>
    > "James Silverton" schrieb :


    they are >> closer to Brussels than Greece.
    >>

    > It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at Yugoslavian>
    > civil war ...


    It always reminded me of the Irish, a bit.



  16. #16
    cfc Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    Let's talk about the balkan FOOD,please. OK? Tomorrow I send another
    good recipe.




    --
    cfc

  17. #17
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?

    In article <uUHtn.240$[email protected]>,
    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > James Silverton wrote:
    >
    > >>>
    > >>> Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe
    > >>> and, altho' the Balkans have been influenced by many other
    > >>> countries, they are closer to Brussels than Greece.
    > >>>
    > >> It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at
    > >> Yugoslavian civil war ...

    > >
    > > That's a dangerous argument. Think of Germany/Austria in the 1930s and 40s.

    >
    > Think of the Balkans as being part of the Austro Hungarian Empire until
    > the end of WW I.


    More importantly, the greater area of the Balkans was part of the
    weakening Ottoman Empire. That background combined with the meddling of
    the 19th century European "Powers" which resulted in the 1878 Treaty of
    Berlin condemned the region to over a century of warfare.

    OB Balkan food: Cevapcici (cheh-vahp-chi-chi) often contains some hot
    paprika as well as the ingredients previously listed. It is often served
    with chopped raw onions and ajvar on the side.

  18. #18
    cfc Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    Serbian Stuffed Peppers - Punjene Paprike

    [image:
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_jR3feX8uQjw/S7...M/paprika.jpg]
    [image:
    http://lh3.ggpht.com/_jR3feX8uQjw/S7...prikasbb6.jpg]
    [image:
    http://lh5.ggpht.com/_jR3feX8uQjw/S7.../paprika2.jpg]

    Ingredients:
    1 large onion or two small onions
    1 cup of rice
    5 green peppers
    1 pound of ground beef
    3 tbsp of sweet "aleva"red paprika
    3 tbsp of Vegeta seasoning
    1 tbsp of tomato paste
    2 tbsp of flour
    2 tbsp of vegetable oil

    Method:

    To make the stuffing, dice the onion into small pieces and saute it
    until it turns a nice yellow color (about 10 minutes). Combine this
    onion with the ground beef and brown the meat until cooked through.
    Remove from the heat. At this point, add in the uncooked rice, vegeta,
    and 2 tbsp of paprika. Salt and pepper to taste.
    Put the stuffing to the side to cool for a little bit. Take this time to
    wash your peppers. Cut off the tops and remove the seeds from the inside
    of the peppers. Be sure to keep the tops to cover the peppers again
    later.

    Stuff your peppers and place them into the pot. Be sure to place them
    tightly together and do not leave wiggle room. Don't forget to replace
    the tops onto the peppers. Fill the pot with water around the peppers up
    just up to the beginning opening of the pepper tops.

    Cook the peppers on medium to low heat for about 1.5 to 2 hours. Make
    sure they do not boil the entire time or else the peppers will fall
    apart.

    When the peppers are done, it is time to make the zaprska (roux). Heat
    the oil in a pan until it is hot and add the flour. Be sure to whisk
    quickly so that the roux does not burn or harden. Add the last tbsp of
    Hungarian Paprika, and the tomato paste. Whisk until the roux comes
    together. Then add 1 cup of water.

    Remove the zaprska from the heat and add into the boiling pot holding
    your stuffed peppers. Bring to a boil and remove all from the heat. At
    this time, the color of the broth should be a reddish color.
    Enjoy!




    --
    cfc

  19. #19
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    "James Silverton" schrieb :
    > Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 16:55:49 +0200:

    <snip>
    >>>

    >> You know that Austria was annexed in 1938 ? No, propably not.
    >> You know that the NSDAP was illegal in Austria until
    >> Schuschnigg caved in after Mussolini made his pact with Hitler
    >> ? No, propably not. You know that the Austrian Nazis were shot
    >> when they tried an armed take-over of the state ? No, propably
    >> not.

    >
    > That is the version of history which many Austrians like to believe.


    Those are the facts.
    Some pictures and an anecdote doesn't change them.

    > There are numerous pictures of happy cheering Austrians during the
    > so-called Anchluss.
    >

    Yes, there were many who cheered.
    If you look at the Austrian borders after 1918, you'll also see why.
    Have you ever heard of the many millions of German speakers who
    were forced off their land and forced to leave ? No, propably not.
    Ever heard of the "300-Reichsmark-Sperre" that the Germans used
    to choke our tourism industry ? No, propably not.
    People who were first dispossessed and then forced out of work tend
    to look for a saviour ...

    <snip anecdote>
    Except for :
    >All around me, as well my parents as our friends as all the neighborhood
    >were totally supporting the Schuschnig government and as this didn't give
    >us the expected satisfaction , most of the people (certainly 3/4) turned to
    >this new man, Seyss-Inquart, extreme populist right wing admirer of Hitler.
    >I remember him well. I saw him on several propaganda meetings where my
    >father took me. A virulent antisemite, for whom only the nazi german
    >example was the road to follow.


    Note the support of the Schuschnig government. Neither he nor his
    party were Nazis.
    Seyss-Inquart came into the government because Schuschnig also gave in
    to Hitler here.
    That are only some of the facts which our "Frank" seems to have forgotten
    along with his German.

    > I emigrated in 1948 to Chicago and live there happily since. I returned
    > a few times to Austria, homesick as you can imgine. Vienna is still a
    > tremendous beautiful city, the country is still overwhelming with
    > breathtaking sceneries, walder, meeren, bergen. But damn, damn, people


    Anyone who seas "meeren" = oceans in Austria isn't exactly a trustworthy
    source for information.

    > didn't change much. Still the exterior freundlichkeit and the inner
    > distrust and jealousy of the stranger and the eternal devil, bearer of all
    > misery, the Jew, remains.


    And that's obvious nonsense.
    It's rather hard to be an "Arier" when half of your ancestors are named
    Travnicek, Posbischil, Hrdlicka or similar.
    Look at the phone book of Vienna to see what I mean.
    You could also look up how many Austrians voted for the NSDAP before
    the party was forbidden in Austria (hint : not too many).

    > I'm 78 now and I'm kind of glad I didn't stick around after the war, as an
    > Austrian I couldnt look people in the eyes without a deep shame, that's my
    > character, nothing can change that.
    >

    I wander what Frank and his family did during the war ...

    Yes, there was scum in my country; but it only rose to the top after 1938.
    And it went to the bottom again after 1945.
    Every country has those people - remember Charles Lindberg and Henry
    Ford ?
    But feel free to continue to ignore the facts.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner




  20. #20
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default OT Re: Do you like the Balkan cuisine?


    "blake murphy" schrieb :
    > On Sat, 3 Apr 2010 14:44:26 +0200, Michael Kuettner wrote:
    >
    >> "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >>> Michael wrote on Sat, 3 Apr 2010 12:00:19 +0200:
    >>>
    >>>> "Giusi" <[email protected]> schrieb :
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "cfc" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel
    >>>>> messaggio
    >>>>>> One Traditional Balkan recipe: Ćevapcici - Grilled rolls of
    >>>>>> minced> beef and lamb, served with chopped fresh onion
    >>>>>
    >>>>> YUM! Which language is making these symbols? I post from
    >>>>> Europe, so I don't usually see them.
    >>>>>
    >>>> Slovenian & other Slavic languages.
    >>>
    >>>>> Hey! That's a European recipe!
    >>>> Whether the Balkans is Europe is an old question ...
    >>>
    >>> Greece is generally indubitably regarded as being in Europe and, altho'
    >>> the Balkans have been influenced by many other countries, they are
    >>> closer to Brussels than Greece.
    >>>

    >> It's not a question of distance, but of mentality. Look at Yugoslavian
    >> civil war ...
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >>
    >> Michael Kuettner

    >
    > i thought it was a question of whiteness...
    >

    That particular nonsense seems to be an USAn thing.
    In 1968, Martin Luther King was murdered in the land of the free
    because he demanded equal rights.
    In 1970, we elected an Austrian Jew as head of government
    (Bundeskanzler) - Bruno Kreisky - because we're a bunch a
    virulent racist Antisemites.
    Something doesn't sound right here ....

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner









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