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Thread: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

  1. #61
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On 29/09/2012 5:47 PM, sf wrote:

    > Wish that worked for San Francisco. Stores are just as crowded during
    > a Niners game as they are any other time... you couldn't get me up and
    > shopping at the crack of dawn (even with a gun), but I did try grocery
    > shopping at midnight once and that was a huge mistake. I waited in
    > line for 45 minutes and had never seen the store so crowded.


    Since I have been retired I have never had more than 2 or 3 people ahead
    of me at a checkout. I can usually roll into a checkout counter as
    someone else is leaving.

    My mother never got out of the habit of shopping on Saturday. I never
    understood it. She had not worked "outside of the home" for year,so it
    wasn't a matter of shopping on her day off. My father was paid monthly,
    so it wasn't a matter of shopping on or the day after pay day.

    I confess to being in the habit of shopping on Friday, but I do it in
    the morning.


  2. #62
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On 9/29/2012 7:07 PM, Dave Smith wrote:

    > Since I have been retired I have never had more than 2 or 3 people ahead
    > of me at a checkout. I can usually roll into a checkout counter as
    > someone else is leaving.
    >
    > My mother never got out of the habit of shopping on Saturday. I never
    > understood it. She had not worked "outside of the home" for year,so it
    > wasn't a matter of shopping on her day off. My father was paid monthly,
    > so it wasn't a matter of shopping on or the day after pay day.


    I remember once thinking This is the last time I'll have to shop
    at Costco on a Saturday. Now I avoid shopping at all on the weekends
    if I can help it. I don't like crowded stores and why gum up the
    works if I can shop on weekdays.

    nancy

  3. #63
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:506783eb$0$7384$[email protected] com...
    > On 9/29/2012 7:07 PM, Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    >> Since I have been retired I have never had more than 2 or 3 people ahead
    >> of me at a checkout. I can usually roll into a checkout counter as
    >> someone else is leaving.
    >>
    >> My mother never got out of the habit of shopping on Saturday. I never
    >> understood it. She had not worked "outside of the home" for year,so it
    >> wasn't a matter of shopping on her day off. My father was paid monthly,
    >> so it wasn't a matter of shopping on or the day after pay day.

    >
    > I remember once thinking This is the last time I'll have to shop
    > at Costco on a Saturday. Now I avoid shopping at all on the weekends
    > if I can help it. I don't like crowded stores and why gum up the
    > works if I can shop on weekdays.
    >
    > nancy




    Same here. I like to shop mid-week for the majority of groceries, and just
    on an as needed basis for the rest of the week, always early morning. I hate
    crowded stores.

    Cheri


  4. #64
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On 9/29/2012 8:37 PM, Cheri wrote:
    > "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    >> I remember once thinking This is the last time I'll have to shop
    >> at Costco on a Saturday. Now I avoid shopping at all on the weekends
    >> if I can help it. I don't like crowded stores and why gum up the
    >> works if I can shop on weekdays.


    > Same here. I like to shop mid-week for the majority of groceries, and
    > just on an as needed basis for the rest of the week, always early
    > morning. I hate crowded stores.


    Really. For years I didn't have much of a choice, I guess I was used
    to it, but I still appreciate that I don't have to do it anymore.

    Now I just need to get grocery shopping done by two, or it's all
    school buses and parents rushing to pick up something for dinner.

    nancy



  5. #65
    Julian Vrieslander Guest

    Default High tech in the supermarket

    In article <k47l76$v0v$[email protected]>,
    dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The layout of the store is designed to have you going through all the
    > aisles in an easy flowing manner with no traffic tie-ups.


    They probably want to minimize traffic jams, but they also want you to
    take a long meandering route through the store. As others in this
    thread have already noted, this maximizes the likelihood that you will
    spot things not on your shopping list and make impulse buys.

    I once heard a store design consultant explain some parts of this
    strategy. Did you ever notice that the staples you buy most often
    (juice, milk, beer, eggs, etc.) are usually at the back of the store?
    Part of that is because these are high turnover or perishable items, and
    they want them close to the loading dock. But did you also notice that
    other items which might be bought together (bread and jelly, pasta and
    sauce) are in different aisles? Frozen foods on the opposite side of
    the store from fresh produce? These choices are not accidental. The
    store designers simulate a typical shopper's path, trying to make it
    long and irregular. I think the term they use for this goal is
    "turbulence". The strategies are not unlike the sneaky things they do
    in Las Vegas casinos to keep you engaged, energized, and discouraged
    from leaving = some of that stuff is VERY interesting, but outside the
    scope of this NG.

    The level of tech in grocery stores is always increasing. A few weeks
    ago, I got into a conversation with a manager in one of our local
    mega-markets (QFC in Seattle). I noticed some round white objects in
    the ceiling over the checkout area, and was curious to know what they
    were for. He told me they were heat sensors, used to measure the number
    of people in the checkout lines. The data feed into a central computer
    system, and used to dynamically allocate staff assignments. When the
    lines get longer, they pull workers from other tasks and put them at the
    checkouts. It sounds a bit creepy, but I guess it benefits the
    customers.

    In the future we will see new developments that some of us will find
    annoying or intrusive. Shopping carts and aisle displays will have LCD
    screens with updating advertisements as we pass through various areas in
    the store. Sensors will detect tags in our smart phones, or the
    products already in our cart, and the ads will be tailored to what you
    have already bought, or what the internet databases know about you.
    Remember the film "Minority Report"? That stuff is coming.

    --
    Julian Vrieslander

  6. #66
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: High tech in the supermarket

    On 9/30/2012 11:05 PM, Julian Vrieslander wrote:
    > In article <k47l76$v0v$[email protected]>,
    > dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The layout of the store is designed to have you going through all the
    >> aisles in an easy flowing manner with no traffic tie-ups.

    >
    > They probably want to minimize traffic jams, but they also want you to
    > take a long meandering route through the store. As others in this
    > thread have already noted, this maximizes the likelihood that you will
    > spot things not on your shopping list and make impulse buys.
    >
    > I once heard a store design consultant explain some parts of this
    > strategy. Did you ever notice that the staples you buy most often
    > (juice, milk, beer, eggs, etc.) are usually at the back of the store?
    > Part of that is because these are high turnover or perishable items, and
    > they want them close to the loading dock. But did you also notice that
    > other items which might be bought together (bread and jelly, pasta and
    > sauce) are in different aisles? Frozen foods on the opposite side of
    > the store from fresh produce? These choices are not accidental. The
    > store designers simulate a typical shopper's path, trying to make it
    > long and irregular. I think the term they use for this goal is
    > "turbulence". The strategies are not unlike the sneaky things they do
    > in Las Vegas casinos to keep you engaged, energized, and discouraged
    > from leaving = some of that stuff is VERY interesting, but outside the
    > scope of this NG.
    >
    > The level of tech in grocery stores is always increasing. A few weeks
    > ago, I got into a conversation with a manager in one of our local
    > mega-markets (QFC in Seattle). I noticed some round white objects in
    > the ceiling over the checkout area, and was curious to know what they
    > were for. He told me they were heat sensors, used to measure the number
    > of people in the checkout lines. The data feed into a central computer
    > system, and used to dynamically allocate staff assignments. When the
    > lines get longer, they pull workers from other tasks and put them at the
    > checkouts. It sounds a bit creepy, but I guess it benefits the
    > customers.
    >
    > In the future we will see new developments that some of us will find
    > annoying or intrusive. Shopping carts and aisle displays will have LCD
    > screens with updating advertisements as we pass through various areas in
    > the store. Sensors will detect tags in our smart phones, or the
    > products already in our cart, and the ads will be tailored to what you
    > have already bought, or what the internet databases know about you.
    > Remember the film "Minority Report"? That stuff is coming.
    >


    Sooner than we think. We're already being tracked and are bombarded by
    personalized messages based on our every actions.

  7. #67
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: High tech in the supermarket

    Julian Vrieslander <MY_FIRST_NAME@MY_LAST_NAME.com> wrote:

    > In the future we will see new developments that some of us
    > will find annoying or intrusive. Shopping carts and aisle
    > displays will have LCD screens with updating advertisements
    > as we pass through various areas in the store. Sensors
    > will detect tags in our smart phones, or the products
    > already in our cart, and the ads will be tailored to what
    > you have already bought, or what the internet databases
    > know about you. Remember the film "Minority Report"? That
    > stuff is coming.




    Julian,

    That future came and went in 1992. When we moved here we found a
    market that had carts with color tablet screens on each cart,
    with an antenna pole to send and receive data. It had multiple
    screens to show where you were in an aisle, what products were
    in that aisle and if you walked past a coupon sale item, it
    displayed the product coupon. After you shopped a few feet past
    the coupon screen would vanish.

    It was great future tech but it was short lived. After six
    months they scrapped the system for some reason. Too 1984 Big
    Brother-ish? Underutilized by low tech shoppers? Stolen tablets?
    Too costly to maintain and support?

    Best,

    Andy

  8. #68
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: High tech in the supermarket

    On 10/1/2012 5:05 AM, Julian Vrieslander wrote:
    > In article <k47l76$v0v$[email protected]>,
    > dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> The layout of the store is designed to have you going through all the
    >> aisles in an easy flowing manner with no traffic tie-ups.

    >
    > They probably want to minimize traffic jams, but they also want you to
    > take a long meandering route through the store. As others in this
    > thread have already noted, this maximizes the likelihood that you will
    > spot things not on your shopping list and make impulse buys.
    >
    > I once heard a store design consultant explain some parts of this
    > strategy. Did you ever notice that the staples you buy most often
    > (juice, milk, beer, eggs, etc.) are usually at the back of the store?
    > Part of that is because these are high turnover or perishable items, and
    > they want them close to the loading dock. But did you also notice that
    > other items which might be bought together (bread and jelly, pasta and
    > sauce) are in different aisles? Frozen foods on the opposite side of
    > the store from fresh produce? These choices are not accidental. The
    > store designers simulate a typical shopper's path, trying to make it
    > long and irregular. I think the term they use for this goal is
    > "turbulence". The strategies are not unlike the sneaky things they do
    > in Las Vegas casinos to keep you engaged, energized, and discouraged
    > from leaving = some of that stuff is VERY interesting, but outside the
    > scope of this NG.
    >
    > The level of tech in grocery stores is always increasing. A few weeks
    > ago, I got into a conversation with a manager in one of our local
    > mega-markets (QFC in Seattle). I noticed some round white objects in
    > the ceiling over the checkout area, and was curious to know what they
    > were for. He told me they were heat sensors, used to measure the number
    > of people in the checkout lines. The data feed into a central computer
    > system, and used to dynamically allocate staff assignments. When the
    > lines get longer, they pull workers from other tasks and put them at the
    > checkouts. It sounds a bit creepy, but I guess it benefits the
    > customers.
    >
    > In the future we will see new developments that some of us will find
    > annoying or intrusive. Shopping carts and aisle displays will have LCD
    > screens with updating advertisements as we pass through various areas in
    > the store. Sensors will detect tags in our smart phones, or the
    > products already in our cart, and the ads will be tailored to what you
    > have already bought, or what the internet databases know about you.
    > Remember the film "Minority Report"? That stuff is coming.
    >


    Very interesting indeed! You describe my grocery store very well and I
    live on the opposite side of the country.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

  9. #69
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On Sep 29, 7:12*am, Nancy Young <rjynlynos...@vverizon.net> wrote:
    >
    > On 9/29/2012 6:42 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > > Publix does have a nifty online shopping list feature. *You can create
    > > and print a shopping list based on what is currently available in the
    > > store nearest you. *You specify the store location, go to the weekly
    > > flier (flyer?) and create a printable shopping list. *No, I don't work
    > > for Publix. LOL *I just think it's a handy feature.

    >
    > It is handy, just click on what you want and you wind up with a
    > printable list. *I only really use it at this one local store, and
    > if I had a nit to pick, they organize my choices under department
    > headings and I don't care for that extra clutter.
    >
    > nancy


    >
    >

    So does Kroger.

  10. #70
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: High tech in the supermarket

    On 10/1/12 5:05 AM, Julian Vrieslander wrote:
    > ....pasta and sauce) are in different aisles?


    Not in any supermarket I've been in.

    -- Larry


  11. #71
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: High tech in the supermarket

    On Mon, 01 Oct 2012 02:05:05 -0700, Julian Vrieslander wrote:

    > The data feed into a central computer
    > system, and used to dynamically allocate staff assignments. When the
    > lines get longer, they pull workers from other tasks and put them at the
    > checkouts. It sounds a bit creepy, but I guess it benefits the
    > customers.


    Sounds like an expensive solution to good 'ol eyesight.

    -sw

  12. #72
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 06:19:44 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sep 29, 7:12*am, Nancy Young <rjynlynos...@vverizon.net> wrote:
    >>
    >> On 9/29/2012 6:42 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >> > Publix does have a nifty online shopping list feature. *You can create
    >> > and print a shopping list based on what is currently available in the
    >> > store nearest you. *You specify the store location, go to the weekly
    >> > flier (flyer?) and create a printable shopping list. *No, I don't work
    >> > for Publix. LOL *I just think it's a handy feature.

    >>
    >> It is handy, just click on what you want and you wind up with a
    >> printable list. *I only really use it at this one local store, and
    >> if I had a nit to pick, they organize my choices under department
    >> headings and I don't care for that extra clutter.
    >>
    >> nancy

    >
    >So does Kroger.


    Most stupidmarkets, even the little market in town here has the
    shopping list app at their web site.
    http://www.gufamilymarkets.com/Shop/WeeklyAd.aspx
    You need to register at a store to access the list.

  13. #73
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On Oct 1, 9:54*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    > On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 06:19:44 -0700 (PDT), "itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net"
    >
    >
    > >> It is handy, just click on what you want and you wind up with a
    > >> printable list. I only really use it at this one local store, and
    > >> if I had a nit to pick, they organize my choices under department
    > >> headings and I don't care for that extra clutter.

    >
    > >> nancy

    >
    > >So does Kroger.

    >
    > Most stupidmarkets, even the little market in town here has the
    > shopping list app at their web site.http://www.gufamilymarkets.com/Shop/WeeklyAd.aspx
    > You need to register at a store to access the list.
    >
    >

    There is one very, very small chain here who is not online. I find it
    annoying to have to wait for their sale paper to be delivered in the
    mail or drop by the store and pick one up just to see if they have any
    decent bargains that week. I don't shop there very frequently but
    they do have some outstanding sales throughout the year that I like to
    hit. Other larger stores/chains are online and I like to see if they
    have anything worth my time and gasoline to shop.

  14. #74
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 08:48:15 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Oct 1, 9:54*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>
    >> On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 06:19:44 -0700 (PDT), "itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net"
    >>
    >>
    >> >> It is handy, just click on what you want and you wind up with a
    >> >> printable list. I only really use it at this one local store, and
    >> >> if I had a nit to pick, they organize my choices under department
    >> >> headings and I don't care for that extra clutter.

    >>
    >> >> nancy

    >>
    >> >So does Kroger.

    >>
    >> Most stupidmarkets, even the little market in town here has the
    >> shopping list app at their web site.
    >> http://www.gufamilymarkets.com/Shop/WeeklyAd.aspx
    >> You need to register at a store to access the list.
    >>
    >>

    >There is one very, very small chain here who is not online. I find it
    >annoying to have to wait for their sale paper to be delivered in the
    >mail or drop by the store and pick one up just to see if they have any
    >decent bargains that week. I don't shop there very frequently but
    >they do have some outstanding sales throughout the year that I like to
    >hit. Other larger stores/chains are online and I like to see if they
    >have anything worth my time and gasoline to shop.


    The sale circulars are weekly, so you have all week to get to the
    store. Here the new sale starts on Sunday but I rarely get there
    until a midweek day. And I'd not be surprised that if you searched
    carefully you'd find a web site for your small chain market and it
    will have the weekly circular on line. Was like five years before I
    found the web site for the market here, its parent company kept
    changing and one day by accident I discoverred it was under Grand
    Union, a defunct chain. And of just a few days ago I discovered that
    a company by the name of "Tops" bought this store... I noticed
    yesterday that changes were beginning, they got all new scales, the
    labels on the meat and deli are different, and the registers at check
    out are all new. The person who owns this entire strip mall property
    lives in Ohio.

  15. #75
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    "[email protected]" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On Oct 1, 9:54*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>
    >> On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 06:19:44 -0700 (PDT),
    >> "itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net"
    >>
    >>
    >> >> It is handy, just click on what you want and you wind
    >> >> up with a printable list. I only really use it at this
    >> >> one local store, and if I had a nit to pick, they
    >> >> organize my choices under department headings and I
    >> >> don't care for that extra clutter.

    >>
    >> >> nancy

    >>
    >> >So does Kroger.

    >>
    >> Most stupidmarkets, even the little market in town here
    >> has the shopping list app at their web
    >> site.http://www.gufamilymarkets.com/Shop/W

    > eeklyAd.aspx
    >> You need to register at a store to access the list.
    >>
    >>

    > There is one very, very small chain here who is not online.
    > I find it annoying to have to wait for their sale paper to
    > be delivered in the mail or drop by the store and pick one
    > up just to see if they have any decent bargains that week.
    > I don't shop there very frequently but they do have some
    > outstanding sales throughout the year that I like to hit.
    > Other larger stores/chains are online and I like to see if
    > they have anything worth my time and gasoline to shop.




    At one time some sales and finder apps that were great ideas but
    poorly managed and maintained and quickly died out.

    One app you could search for a product and it would list all the
    markets nearby with price comparisons. The prices were so rarely
    updated it was useless.

    Another similar app would read the barcode and do basically the
    same but more broad in scope in that you could receive hardware,
    dollar store, BB&B etc. items. Again outdated prices.

    One ambitious app let you create a list of products and if while
    driving, if a store was in your proximity It popped up the
    stores, mapping from you to them and the products. A good idea
    if you were passing through an unknown town for that six pack of
    Bud Light. This app just as quickly "faded to black."

    Two of my supermarkets are online that I registered to but only
    to do product availability and price comparisons.

    I also registered at the recipe website allrecipes.com to store
    selected recipes in my recipe box. If I need a list of a
    recipe's ingredients it's a few clicks away with smarts to let
    you exclude ingredients you have in stock along with recipe
    scaling.

    I make up my staple shopping lists using "ShopShop" on the
    iPhone. The most intuitive, easy, flexible and beautiful GUI.
    Once an item is in your cart, just tapping it in the list red-
    lines the item and moves it to the bottom of the list. Items can
    be arranged into aisles.

    It's a free app at the Appstore.:

    Here's my lists
    http://oi47.tinypic.com/357edco.jpg

    I also keep all my saved PC recipes on the iPhone to refer to
    when shopping or email recipes upon request from anywhere to
    anyone.

    I used to have every free cookbook app available. While novel
    they were all to much eye strain to follow. A rapid passing
    interest.

    Andy


  16. #76
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On Oct 1, 12:34*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >
    > The sale circulars are weekly, so you have all week to get to the
    > store. *Here the new sale starts on Sunday but I rarely get there
    > until a midweek day. *And I'd not be surprised that if you searched
    > carefully you'd find a web site for your small chain market and it
    > will have the weekly circular on line.
    >
    >

    I wish I could say they are hiding their online ad from me, but that
    would be a big fib. Truthfully, they don't have anything online, the
    store chain (4 of 5 stores) is owned by an old codger. He probably
    has no idea he could put his ad online and if it would cost him a
    penny to do it he would not.

  17. #77
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    Cheri wrote:
    > "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> I asked one of the staff, "the old aisle pattern was so
    >> logical, why change it?" He shrugged and said "that's what the
    >> bosses want."
    >>
    >> I felt bad for the staff AND shoppers.
    >>
    >> [Sigh]
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    >
    > I really, really hate it when they do that, sometimes for no rhyme or
    > reason except maybe some pencil pusher decided that a change would be
    > nice...definitely not!
    >
    > Cheri


    I have decided, perhaps incorrectly, that they LIKE making folks
    pay attention to more things in the store instead of just
    continuing to zero in on the products they want. Perhaps if
    people have to look around, they will end up discovering products
    that are either new or new to them, and buying said products.
    That being said, I really don't like it.

    --

  18. #78
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On Oct 1, 8:16*pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    > I have decided, perhaps incorrectly, that they LIKE making folks
    > pay attention to more things in the store instead of just
    > continuing to zero in on the products they want. *Perhaps if
    > people have to look around, they will end up discovering products
    > that are either new or new to them, and buying said products.
    > That being said, I really don't like it.
    >
    >

    I agree completely.


  19. #79
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On Mon, 01 Oct 2012 21:16:29 -0400, "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Cheri wrote:
    >> "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    >>>
    >>> I asked one of the staff, "the old aisle pattern was so
    >>> logical, why change it?" He shrugged and said "that's what the
    >>> bosses want."
    >>>
    >>> I felt bad for the staff AND shoppers.
    >>>
    >>> [Sigh]
    >>>
    >>> Andy

    >>
    >>
    >> I really, really hate it when they do that, sometimes for no rhyme or
    >> reason except maybe some pencil pusher decided that a change would be
    >> nice...definitely not!
    >>
    >> Cheri

    >
    >I have decided, perhaps incorrectly, that they LIKE making folks
    >pay attention to more things in the store instead of just
    >continuing to zero in on the products they want. Perhaps if
    >people have to look around, they will end up discovering products
    >that are either new or new to them, and buying said products.
    >That being said, I really don't like it.



    There is an entire industry that studies ideal placement of products
    in parts of the store and more specifically, on the shelves.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2741065/
    http://www.markettools.com/market-re...duct-placement

    Boron

  20. #80
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Do the Supermarket Shuffle! :-(

    On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 08:48:15 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Oct 1, 9:54*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > >
    > > On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 06:19:44 -0700 (PDT), "itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net"
    > >
    > >
    > > >> It is handy, just click on what you want and you wind up with a
    > > >> printable list. I only really use it at this one local store, and
    > > >> if I had a nit to pick, they organize my choices under department
    > > >> headings and I don't care for that extra clutter.

    > >
    > > >> nancy

    > >
    > > >So does Kroger.

    > >
    > > Most stupidmarkets, even the little market in town here has the
    > > shopping list app at their web site.http://www.gufamilymarkets.com/Shop/WeeklyAd.aspx
    > > You need to register at a store to access the list.
    > >
    > >

    > There is one very, very small chain here who is not online. I find it
    > annoying to have to wait for their sale paper to be delivered in the
    > mail or drop by the store and pick one up just to see if they have any
    > decent bargains that week. I don't shop there very frequently but
    > they do have some outstanding sales throughout the year that I like to
    > hit. Other larger stores/chains are online and I like to see if they
    > have anything worth my time and gasoline to shop.


    I guess there are two camps. Those who read those things and those
    who don't. I want to shop when I feel like shopping. If something is
    on sale, fine. If it's not and I want to buy it, I don't care. I'm
    certainly not going to build my life around some grocery sale pamphlet
    (or whatever those things are called).

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

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