Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

  1. #1
    sueb Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

    On Aug 12, 3:38*pm, "Gregory Morrow" <GMor...@Usenet-News.net> wrote:
    > http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/12/di...html?ref=style
    >
    > August 12, 2009
    >
    > Image Problem? Don't Pity the Bell
    >
    > By JULIA MOSKIN
    >
    > "MODERN food lovers are expected to enjoy everything put in front of them:
    > beef cheeks, pig trotters, the occasional sea cucumber or goat udder. Yetan
    > exception is made for the green bell pepper, the sturdy yet forlorn
    > supermarket vegetable that foodies love to hate.
    >
    > "I get a sour taste and a weird feeling in my throat just looking at one"
    > said Diane Ceriello, a home cook in Merrick, N.Y. "I love the reds, but I
    > can't be in the same room as a green bell pepper." Others compare their
    > texture and flavor to those of a Styrofoam cup. In wines, the aroma of green
    > peppers - characteristic of some Cabernet wines - is considered aggressive,
    > something to be kept strictly under control.
    >
    > Yes, it's an unforgiving world for green peppers, often dismissed as an
    > unripe, indigestible form of the sweetly superior reds. In "Chez Panisse
    > Vegetables" (William Morrow, 1996), Alice Waters calls the green ones
    > "bitter" and "a mistake."
    >.........deleted
    > </>


    What a bunch of wimps these foodies are!
    I love raw green peppers - I volunteer to eat all of theirs. They can
    have my lima beans and okra.

    Susan B.

  2. #2
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!



    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/12/di...html?ref=style

    August 12, 2009

    Image Problem? Don't Pity the Bell

    By JULIA MOSKIN

    "MODERN food lovers are expected to enjoy everything put in front of them:
    beef cheeks, pig trotters, the occasional sea cucumber or goat udder. Yet an
    exception is made for the green bell pepper, the sturdy yet forlorn
    supermarket vegetable that foodies love to hate.

    "I get a sour taste and a weird feeling in my throat just looking at one"
    said Diane Ceriello, a home cook in Merrick, N.Y. "I love the reds, but I
    can't be in the same room as a green bell pepper." Others compare their
    texture and flavor to those of a Styrofoam cup. In wines, the aroma of green
    peppers - characteristic of some Cabernet wines - is considered aggressive,
    something to be kept strictly under control.

    Yes, it's an unforgiving world for green peppers, often dismissed as an
    unripe, indigestible form of the sweetly superior reds. In "Chez Panisse
    Vegetables" (William Morrow, 1996), Alice Waters calls the green ones
    "bitter" and "a mistake."

    Even Amanda Cohen, a chef so enamored of vegetables that she thinks of them
    as "dirt candy," the name she gave her East Village restaurant, has never
    served a green pepper since opening last year. "As a vegetarian, you get
    served a lot of stuffed green peppers at dinner parties," she said. "It's
    taking me a long time to recover from those, but I'm working on it."

    But the vegetable has its defenders, who say that the green pepper family is
    tasty, diverse and versatile.

    Zaid Hadieh, a farmer in Chenango County in New York, grows cubanelles,
    Hungarians, poblanos and Anaheims, among other peppers meant to be harvested
    while green and pungent. "Sometimes that immature flavor is what you want,"
    Mr. Hadieh said. For a traditional Palestinian bean dish, his wife, Haifa,
    adds raw green bell pepper, finely minced with lemon and garlic, to cooked
    fava beans. "It brings freshness to the plate," he said.

    Green peppers have a concentrated grassy flavor that's close to asparagus,
    and with their lightly astringent skin, peppers make perfect sides for rich
    steak, pork, sausages and grilled fish. They can be slow-grilled or roasted
    to bring out the silky weight of the flesh. "The Turks could not live
    without green peppers," said Paula Wolfert, who has written extensively
    about culinary traditions around the Mediterranean, where green peppers are
    appreciated as a vegetable in their own right. When she travels to the
    region, she takes along a supply of serrated swivel peelers (her favorite
    tool for removing pepper skins) to give to the home cooks she meets. But she
    says that peeling is only necessary for thick-skinned peppers like bells,
    and even then only if they are not going to be roasted first, as in her
    recipe for green peppers steamed, then sautéed in duck fat and livened with
    a splash of sherry vinegar.

    Seamus Mullen, the chef and an owner of Boqueria in Manhattan, is an
    ambassador for the Basque way with green peppers, especially pimientos de
    padrón, a variety from Spain; he deep-fries them, tosses them with flaky
    salt, and serves them in irresistible big piles. The small peppers have
    sweet flesh and no seeds to speak of, so they can be eaten whole. Padrón
    peppers are not spicy unless they are grown near jalapeños or other hot
    peppers: cross-pollination produces the occasional hot padrón.

    Padrón peppers are hard to grow in the Northeast, so Mr. Mullen often buys
    shi****os, a small Asian green pepper with a citrusy flavor that is
    commercially grown in California. Shi****os are served at yakitori spots
    like Aburiya Kinnosuke in Midtown, threaded onto skewers, grilled and served
    alongside rich bites of chicken thigh and skin.

    Yuno's Farm, an Asian vegetable specialist in New Jersey, grows both
    shi****os and padróns. "The young shi****os are not hot at all," said Eugena
    Yoo, who works at the farm. "We eat them whole and raw in Korean food," she
    said. Kkoari (the peppers' Korean name) are also pickled in kimchi, or
    stir-fried with anchovies and sprinkled with soy sauce.

    Some green peppers, like poblanos and Anaheims, have a lot of chili heat
    when raw - but cooking them reduces it to a pleasant, palatable slow burn.
    Hatch green chilies, prized in New Mexico, are mildly to medium hot, and
    just coming into season now. The passion for them has spread to Los Angeles,
    where large outdoor Hatch chili roasts will be held this month in the
    parking lots of some Albertsons and Bristol Farms markets. The roasted
    chilies can be frozen for wintry stews of pork and green chili, or stuffed
    with cheese, or sliced into rajas to fill a quesadilla or ornament a taco.

    A little experimentation proved that even painfully hot jalapeños can be
    roasted into submission: a new device from Williams-Sonoma, designed to hold
    jalapeños upright while they are stuffed with cheese and then slowly
    grilled, produced a satisfying, upscale version of jalapeño poppers, stuffed
    with cheddar and bits of chorizo. Pepper haters and popper snobs alike will
    melt, along with the cheese..."


    </>





  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

    sueb wrote:
    >
    > What a bunch of wimps these foodies are!
    > I love raw green peppers - I volunteer to eat all of theirs. They can
    > have my lima beans and okra.


    I'll take the okra. Vegetarian caviar, it is.

  4. #4
    Bent Attorney Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

    On Aug 12, 7:57*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > sueb wrote:
    >
    > > What a bunch of wimps these foodies are!
    > > I love raw green peppers - I volunteer to eat all of theirs. *They can
    > > have my lima beans and okra.

    >
    > I'll take the okra. *Vegetarian caviar, it is.


    Stuffed red peppers is where it's at. Sweet, hot, you name it.

  5. #5
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

    sueb wrote:
    > On Aug 12, 3:38 pm, "Gregory Morrow" <GMor...@Usenet-News.net> wrote:


    >> Yes, it's an unforgiving world for green peppers, often dismissed as
    >> an unripe, indigestible form of the sweetly superior reds. In "Chez
    >> Panisse Vegetables" (William Morrow, 1996), Alice Waters calls the
    >> green ones "bitter" and "a mistake."
    >> .........deleted
    >> </>

    >
    > What a bunch of wimps these foodies are!
    > I love raw green peppers - I volunteer to eat all of theirs. They can
    > have my lima beans and okra.


    I'm with you! but I'd take your limas and pass along the okra to
    someone else. I love green peppers, what's with those people?

    nancy

  6. #6
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

    "Bent Attorney Esq." wrote:
    >
    > On Aug 12, 7:57 pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > > sueb wrote:
    > >
    > > > What a bunch of wimps these foodies are!
    > > > I love raw green peppers - I volunteer to eat all of theirs. They can
    > > > have my lima beans and okra.

    > >
    > > I'll take the okra. Vegetarian caviar, it is.

    >
    > Stuffed red peppers is where it's at. Sweet, hot, you name it.


    I'd rather have a Chile Relleno.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chile_Relleno

  7. #7
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

    Asparagus and mushrooms have an earthy taste, but green bell peppers do
    not taste earthy or grassy to me.


    Becca

  8. #8
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

    Becca wrote on Wed, 12 Aug 2009 20:07:58 -0500:

    > Asparagus and mushrooms have an earthy taste, but green bell
    > peppers do not taste earthy or grassy to me.


    I don't think mushrooms or asparagus have any earthy taste; they are
    just fine! I like green peppers stir fried or stuffed. I'll sometimes
    use red or orange peppers when, as not infrequently, they don't cost
    much more than green.


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

    Greg submitted:

    > http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/12/di...html?ref=style


    I'm surprised that the article didn't mention Cuban or Creole cuisine, both
    of which make extensive use of green bell peppers. It seems to be quite a
    glaring omission.

    Bob


  10. #10
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

    Becca wrote:
    > Asparagus and mushrooms have an earthy taste, but green bell peppers do
    > not taste earthy or grassy to me.
    >
    > Becca




    To me they taste like sulphur smells, like the odor of lighting a wooden
    match. I hated them as a child, now I find thm OK but prefer red or
    yellow bells.

    gloria p

  11. #11
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!

    On Wed, 12 Aug 2009 18:34:19 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >Greg submitted:
    >
    >> http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/12/di...html?ref=style

    >
    >I'm surprised that the article didn't mention Cuban or Creole cuisine, both
    >of which make extensive use of green bell peppers. It seems to be quite a
    >glaring omission.


    Obviously, where I am near Beaumont, we use the Cajun trinity quite a
    bit. But chick-pea salad without julienned bell pepper? Unthinkable.
    As for stuffed peppers, I have eaten (and sometimes cooked) them
    in the style of the Hungarians, stuffed with pork/beef and finished
    with tomato and sauerkraut, Lebanese, stuffed with lamb and pine
    nuts, Hell, for that matter stuffed with lamb and couscous, or beef
    and orzo, or pork and rice. Stuffed cabbage and stuffed peppers
    in the same pot is a marriage made in heaven.

    ALex, biased in favor of sweet peppers in general. Especially
    Hungarian sweet wax peppers and apple peppers. Which
    reminds me: Bell peppers topped, cored, filled with shredded
    red cabbage with celery seed, marinated in pickling brine
    for a week or two. (It's *alive*!!!) Serve with salami, kolbasz,
    rye bread and a Dreher or three.

  12. #12
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Do Not Pity The Green Bell Pepper...!!!


    "Chemiker" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 12 Aug 2009 18:34:19 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    > <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:
    >
    >>Greg submitted:
    >>
    >>> http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/12/di...html?ref=style

    >>
    >>I'm surprised that the article didn't mention Cuban or Creole cuisine,
    >>both
    >>of which make extensive use of green bell peppers. It seems to be quite a
    >>glaring omission.

    >
    > Obviously, where I am near Beaumont, we use the Cajun trinity quite a
    > bit. But chick-pea salad without julienned bell pepper? Unthinkable.
    > As for stuffed peppers, I have eaten (and sometimes cooked) them


    A grilled guido saw-seege hero without a ton of caramelized peppers and
    onions is sacriledge.
    Whenever my garden produces a glut of bell peppers the only way I can use
    them fast enough is to grill them, fantastically good plain with the grilled
    eggplant, sublime as a burger topping... and can't eat saw-seege without.
    Grilled bell pepper halves are excellent marinated, perfect in an East
    Beantown grinder.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32