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Thread: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

  1. #1
    Lin Guest

    Default Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    I'm finally settling back into "home mode" and getting my routine back
    on track since all the traveling in June and this first week of July.
    Took my beloved almost six-year-old granddaughter back to Oklahoma on
    Wednesday, and then flew back to California the same day. Not something
    I'd like to do often for sure. Wore me out.

    Anyway, I was feeling inspired and ready to get back into the kitchen.
    Safeway had fresh, wild caught halibut on sale for $8.99/lb., so I
    snagged two thick fillets. With fish as the star, tonight's dinner was
    of a Latin/Cuban/Mexican variety.

    I made Rick Bayless' "Salsa Verde: Green Tomatillo Salsa." I used
    serranos instead of jalapenos and roasted the tomatillos in the broiler
    rather than doing the raw/fresh version. Rick provides instructions on
    both ways. Owcheewawa it was spicy! Bob loved it, of course.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/m...ipe/index.html

    I also had some fresh corn, so I made a black bean, corn, and red bell
    pepper relish/salad. This was made on the fly, using a little red chili
    pepper flakes, a bit of three different vinegars till I got the flavor
    and brightness I wanted. I did add a little chopped torpedo onion as well.

    For the halibut, I put a little kosher salt and a light dusting of
    jalapeno powder on and let that sit as I prepped the rest of the meal.
    When I was ready to cook the fillets, I sprinkled just a little bit of
    rice flour on the side that didn't have skin. This was the side to go
    down into a hot skillet of a tablespoon or so of grapeseed oil and a pat
    of butter (fish browns and tastes so good in butter!) This was the first
    butter I've used in cooking in I don't know how long. Browned it on
    floured side for about four minutes, flipped it, lowered the heat a bit
    and let it cook another three or so minutes.

    While the fish was cooking I made a concoction of sliced chunks of
    plantain and red bananas. Originally, it was based on Bobby Flay's
    "Grilled Plantain with Spicy Sugar Glaze." I deviated from that by not
    using the grill and using a deep skillet on the stove top. I used only
    one very large plantain and two of the red bananas. It was my first time
    doing plantains and they were tasty, but I think they could have used a
    little more time. The red bananas were perfect.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/b...ipe/index.html

    So, I get it all to the table and decide, "hmmmm .... flour tortillas
    would be great with this." Dinner then evolved into fish soft tacos.
    Damn, it was good, easy to prepare and healthy. I have a fair amount of
    the salsa verde left and was surprised that it really didn't overpower
    the taste of the fish -- but I wasn't ladling huge scoops of salsa on my
    tacos. A little goes a long way. It would go great with pork I think.
    I've also got a couple more huge plantains and five red bananas left.
    Ah, the possibilities!

    Tonight's dinner was definitely worth doing again.

    What did you all have this evening?

    --Lin (Improv cooking - I'm really bad when it comes to following
    recipes as they've been written)





  2. #2
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    Lin wrote:

    > Anyway, I was feeling inspired and ready to get back into the kitchen.
    > Safeway had fresh, wild caught halibut on sale for $8.99/lb., so I snagged
    > two thick fillets. With fish as the star, tonight's dinner was of a
    > Latin/Cuban/Mexican variety.


    It was all very good. The black bean salad/relish was particularly
    refreshing, and complemented everything else nicely. Lucky me -- I took the
    leftovers to work with me tonight!

    Bob


  3. #3
    Food911 Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    On Fri, 10 Jul 2009 19:37:36 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >Lin wrote:
    >
    >> Anyway, I was feeling inspired and ready to get back into the kitchen.
    >> Safeway had fresh, wild caught halibut on sale for $8.99/lb., so I snagged
    >> two thick fillets. With fish as the star, tonight's dinner was of a
    >> Latin/Cuban/Mexican variety.

    >
    >It was all very good. The black bean salad/relish was particularly
    >refreshing, and complemented everything else nicely. Lucky me -- I took the
    >leftovers to work with me tonight!
    >
    >Bob



    I decided to splurge, porter house steaks, asparagus with a white
    cheese sauce, scalloped potatoes with bacon, and a raspberry custard
    pie for dessert.

  4. #4
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    Stu wrote:

    > I decided to splurge, porter house steaks, asparagus with a white
    > cheese sauce, scalloped potatoes with bacon, and a raspberry custard
    > pie for dessert.


    Porterhouse is one of my favorite cuts. The whole meal sounds like a
    worthy splurge!

    What is your recipe for the raspberry custard pie?

    --Lin

  5. #5
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    Stu wrote:

    > I decided to splurge, porter house steaks, asparagus with a white
    > cheese sauce, scalloped potatoes with bacon, and a raspberry custard
    > pie for dessert.


    Seems a little dairy-heavy: Cheese with the asparagus, milk or cream with
    the potatoes, and cream in the pie. Not that there's anything *wrong* with
    it, but I think I'd prefer a meal like that when it's about fifty degrees
    cooler than it is here.

    Bob


  6. #6
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    On Fri, 10 Jul 2009 20:25:13 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >Stu wrote:
    >
    >> I decided to splurge, porter house steaks, asparagus with a white
    >> cheese sauce, scalloped potatoes with bacon, and a raspberry custard
    >> pie for dessert.

    >
    >Seems a little dairy-heavy: Cheese with the asparagus, milk or cream with
    >the potatoes, and cream in the pie. Not that there's anything *wrong* with
    >it, but I think I'd prefer a meal like that when it's about fifty degrees
    >cooler than it is here.
    >
    >Bob



    Bob, we all need to splurge once in awhile.

  7. #7
    Stu Guest

    Default REC Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    On Fri, 10 Jul 2009 20:20:55 -0700, Lin <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Stu wrote:
    >
    >> I decided to splurge, porter house steaks, asparagus with a white
    >> cheese sauce, scalloped potatoes with bacon, and a raspberry custard
    >> pie for dessert.

    >
    >Porterhouse is one of my favorite cuts. The whole meal sounds like a
    >worthy splurge!
    >
    >What is your recipe for the raspberry custard pie?
    >
    >--Lin




    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Raspberry Custard Pie

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories :

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    Filling Ingredients
    2 tablespoons all-purpose flour, plus more for surface
    3/4 cup sugar
    1 large egg
    1 cup heavy cream
    1 pound (3 1/2 cups) raspberries, plus more for garnish
    1/4 teaspoon salt

    Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Roll pate brisee to 1/8-inch thickness on a
    lightly floured surface. Fit into a 9-inch pie dish, and trim edges, leaving a
    1-inch overhang. Tuck overhang under so edges are flush with rim, and crimp
    edges. Prick bottom of dough with a fork. Freeze for 15 minutes. Line dough
    with parchment, and fill with pie weights or dried beans. Bake until edges
    begin to turn gold, 25 to 30 minutes. Remove weights and parchment. Bake until
    crust is light gold and cooked through, 10 to 15 minutes. Let cool on a wire
    rack.

    Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees. Whisk flour and 1/2 cup sugar in a
    medium bowl. Add egg and cream, and whisk to combine. Toss raspberries,
    remaining cup sugar, and the salt in a medium bowl. Spoon berries into crust,
    then pour in cream mixture, filling to just below the rim.

    Bake until custard is set but still a bit wobbly in the center, about 45
    minutes. Let cool in dish on a wire rack. Cover, and refrigerate for at least 2
    hours (or up to 1 day). Garnish with fresh raspberries, and serve cold.

    "Source: Martha Stewart"
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 184 Calories; 12g Fat (55.5% calories
    from fat); 1g Protein; 20g Carbohydrate; 0g Dietary Fiber; 67mg Cholesterol;
    87mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Lean Meat; 0 Non-Fat Milk; 2 1/2 Fat; 1 1/2 Other
    Carbohydrates.

    Makes one 9-inch crust

    1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon sugar
    4 ounces (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
    2 to 4 tablespoons ice water

    Directions

    Pulse flour, salt, and sugar in a food processor until combined. Add butter,
    and process until mixture resembles coarse meal, about 10 seconds. With the
    machine running, add ice water in a slow, steady stream until mixture just
    begins to hold together.
    Shape dough into a disk, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate until firm, about 1
    hour (or up to 2 days).

  8. #8
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    Lin wrote:
    > I'm finally settling back into "home mode" and getting my routine back
    > on track since all the traveling in June and this first week of July.
    > Took my beloved almost six-year-old granddaughter back to Oklahoma on
    > Wednesday, and then flew back to California the same day. Not something
    > I'd like to do often for sure. Wore me out.
    >
    > Anyway, I was feeling inspired and ready to get back into the kitchen.
    > Safeway had fresh, wild caught halibut on sale for $8.99/lb., so I
    > snagged two thick fillets. With fish as the star, tonight's dinner was
    > of a Latin/Cuban/Mexican variety.


    Dinner sounds yummy.

    I took some beef out last night so we could have beef stew today. Only
    it was pork. Oops. Pork stew is good, though, as it turns out. :-)
    (Potatoes, onions, garlic, celery, carrots, mushrooms, Maggi seasoning,
    salt, pepper, thickened a bit with cornstarch.)

    Serene

  9. #9
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    Hi Serene, you wrote:

    > I took some beef out last night so we could have beef stew today. Only
    > it was pork. Oops. Pork stew is good, though, as it turns out. :-)
    > (Potatoes, onions, garlic, celery, carrots, mushrooms, Maggi seasoning,
    > salt, pepper, thickened a bit with cornstarch.)


    That does sound good! I know we have Maggi seasoning in the pantry, but
    I've never used it before. I'll keep it in mind for the next stew.

    It's cooled off enough during the day (90 degrees!) that I considered
    putting on a good chicken stock tonight, as well as a bacon stock with
    some pork rinds and bits from a pork belly we have. As late as it is,
    the stock will have to wait. But, I do see a white chicken chili in my
    future!

    Also on the agenda: I picked up a London Broil that I'm going to brown
    and then slow cook in the oven with a red chile sauce I picked up in New
    Mexico while dining with Christine D at "El Pinto." Not sure if/what I
    should add to it. The dish they served at the restaurant appeared to be
    beef that was simmered forever in the brilliant red stuff. No other
    additions besides being served on a bread-like tortilla. I think they
    called it a flat beef taco, but Christine would probably know better
    what it was.

    Speaking of London Broil ... I've considered buying more and grinding it
    for ground round. These cuts I've been getting are very, very lean. Good
    or bad idea? At $1.99/lb I don't think I could go wrong, but you never
    know. I usually choose a good chuck or sirloin for grinding.

    --Lin

  10. #10
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    Quoting myself, I wrote:

    > The dish they served at the restaurant appeared to be
    > beef that was simmered forever in the brilliant red stuff. No other
    > additions besides being served on a bread-like tortilla. I think they
    > called it a flat beef taco, but Christine would probably know better
    > what it was.


    I just looked at the menu online and it's called a "Rolled Taco." Funny
    that ... it was flat and open on my plate.

    --Lin

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    On Fri, 10 Jul 2009 22:27:36 -0700, Lin <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >That does sound good! I know we have Maggi seasoning in the pantry, but
    >I've never used it before. I'll keep it in mind for the next stew.


    Maggi is used a lot by Scandinavians. I bought some because a Danish
    friend swore by it, but I barely dented my bottle... couldn't stand
    the flavor. I prefer L & P Worcestershire sauce.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  12. #12
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    On Fri, 10 Jul 2009 18:02:56 -0700, Lin wrote:
    >
    > I made Rick Bayless' "Salsa Verde: Green Tomatillo Salsa." I used
    > serranos instead of jalapenos and roasted the tomatillos in the broiler
    > rather than doing the raw/fresh version. Rick provides instructions on
    > both ways. Owcheewawa it was spicy! Bob loved it, of course.
    >
    > http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/m...ipe/index.html
    >
    > I also had some fresh corn, so I made a black bean, corn, and red bell
    > pepper relish/salad. This was made on the fly, using a little red chili
    > pepper flakes, a bit of three different vinegars till I got the flavor
    > and brightness I wanted. I did add a little chopped torpedo onion as well.


    o.k., you made me google 'torpedo onion.' i don't think i've seen one
    before. is it kinda regional?

    your pal,
    blake

  13. #13
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    "sf" wrote:
    >
    > Maggi is used a lot by Scandinavians. I bought some because a Danish
    > friend swore by it, but I barely dented my bottle... couldn't stand
    > the flavor. I prefer L & P Worcestershire sauce.
    >
    >

    They're really not comparable products. The Maggi bottled product is
    essentially a meat extract concentrate, a bouillion cube in liquid form and
    is also a darkening colorant, contains caramelized sugar (burnt surgar).
    Other ethan a small amount of anchovy worcestershire is primarilly a
    vegetable product used as a sauce/condiment.



  14. #14
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    On Fri, 10 Jul 2009 18:02:56 -0700, Lin wrote:

    > I made Rick Bayless' "Salsa Verde: Green Tomatillo Salsa." I
    > used serranos instead of jalapenos and roasted the tomatillos
    > in the broiler rather than doing the raw/fresh version. Rick
    > provides instructions on both ways. Owcheewawa it was spicy! Bob
    > loved it, of course.


    Serranos are the standard choice for Salsa Verde; I wonder
    why Bayless specified jalapenos.

    It's great to roast everything, but if it's ultimately going
    into a pork chile verde where it braises for several hours,
    it's okay to not pre-cook the tomatillos. (It's non-intuitive
    as they are not very appetizing just raw and diced up.)

    Steve

  15. #15
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    blake murphy wrote:

    > o.k., you made me google 'torpedo onion.' i don't think i've seen one
    > before. is it kinda regional?


    I suppose it is. I'd never heard of them before moving to California --
    though I don't know why they wouldn't grow anywhere that regular onions
    can grow.

    The are very sweet and mild. They are great on sandwiches. I especially
    like them in tuna salad. The tops are too large and thick to do anything
    with though.

    --Lin

  16. #16
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    Steve Pope wrote:

    > Serranos are the standard choice for Salsa Verde; I wonder
    > why Bayless specified jalapenos.


    I'm not sure if you looked at the recipe, but the choice was using two
    serranos or one jalapeno. Maybe the serranos aren't as easy to come by
    across the country, or maybe they are seasonal in areas. Jalapenos seem
    to be everywhere year round.

    > It's great to roast everything, but if it's ultimately going
    > into a pork chile verde where it braises for several hours,
    > it's okay to not pre-cook the tomatillos. (It's non-intuitive
    > as they are not very appetizing just raw and diced up.)


    It was my first time using tomatillos. I might have to try them raw at
    some point, but the roasting sure brought out a lot of flavor.

    BTW: We've been watching "Top Chef Masters" and I especially enjoyed the
    episode with Rick Bayless. I didn't know he was from my old stomping
    grounds of Oklahoma City! His family owned a very famous BBQ joint there
    for 30 years.

    --Lin

  17. #17
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    Lin <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Pope wrote:


    >> Serranos are the standard choice for Salsa Verde; I wonder
    >> why Bayless specified jalapenos.


    >I'm not sure if you looked at the recipe, but the choice was using two
    >serranos or one jalapeno. Maybe the serranos aren't as easy to come by
    >across the country, or maybe they are seasonal in areas. Jalapenos seem
    >to be everywhere year round.


    Yes, it's a bit of an issue because tomatillos appear earlier
    in the season than various kinds of peppers. In fact, the
    tomatillos are already there now. But there is some overlap, in
    the autumn months.

    >> It's great to roast everything, but if it's ultimately going
    >> into a pork chile verde where it braises for several hours,
    >> it's okay to not pre-cook the tomatillos. (It's non-intuitive
    >> as they are not very appetizing just raw and diced up.)


    >It was my first time using tomatillos. I might have to try them raw at
    >some point, but the roasting sure brought out a lot of flavor.


    If you're a meat-eater and have not made a classic tomatillo/serrano/
    pork shoulder based chili verde, I strongly encourage it. It's
    really straightforward, pretty much a can't-miss dish. Prepping
    all the tomatillos is probably the only tedious part of it.

    Steve

  18. #18
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    blake wrote:

    > o.k., you made me google 'torpedo onion.' i don't think i've seen one
    > before. is it kinda regional?


    I'd never seen it before I joined the CSA. The variety is apparently from
    Italy, but it ought to grow in latitudes close to Sacramento's.

    Bob


  19. #19
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    On Sat, 11 Jul 2009 18:25:24 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >blake wrote:
    >
    >> o.k., you made me google 'torpedo onion.' i don't think i've seen one
    >> before. is it kinda regional?

    >
    >I'd never seen it before I joined the CSA. The variety is apparently from
    >Italy, but it ought to grow in latitudes close to Sacramento's.
    >
    >Bob


    I think they grow near Stockton. I used to see them in Berkeley Bowl
    all summer. I love them.

    Can't get them here...darnit.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  20. #20
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Dinner - Friday 7/10/09

    Christine wrote about torpedo onions:

    > I think they grow near Stockton. I used to see them in Berkeley Bowl
    > all summer. I love them.
    >
    > Can't get them here...darnit.


    It's a function of how long the days are (which in turn is a function of
    latitude). We're pretty far north of you. I don't think you ever get the 15
    1/2 hours of sunlight that we get during our "long day" season, and that's
    what determines viability for torpedo onions.

    Bob


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