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Thread: A different cauliflower puree.

  1. #1
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default A different cauliflower puree.

    I decided to make a cauliflower puree to go with the pot roast I was
    making today.

    As I was pulling the stem and green parts off the head, I started
    looking at the green stems and decided ,.... why had I been throwing
    this perfectly good part of a cauliflower away all these years.
    So, I cut the leaves and stems....the part of the stems that were not
    woody....off and chopped them up and put them in the pot I was going
    to cook the cauliflower in. I simmered them for about 10 minutes
    until they were tender and then threw in the rest of the head of
    cauliflower and cooked until it was tender.

    I drained the cauliflower and whipped it up with some butter, sour
    cream, salt, pepper and parsley.

    It is quite yummy, much more flavor than a bland white cauliflower
    puree. I used a hand
    mixer to beat the cauliflower and the green parts and stems did not
    whip up totally and the whole thing looked more like a colcannon.

    I figure it's got way more vitamins, minerals and fiber....plus it's
    GOOD.


  2. #2
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: A different cauliflower puree.

    On Sat, 14 Jan 2012 16:50:46 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I decided to make a cauliflower puree to go with the pot roast I was
    >making today.
    >
    >As I was pulling the stem and green parts off the head, I started
    >looking at the green stems and decided ,.... why had I been throwing
    >this perfectly good part of a cauliflower away all these years.
    >So, I cut the leaves and stems....the part of the stems that were not
    >woody....off and chopped them up and put them in the pot I was going
    >to cook the cauliflower in. I simmered them for about 10 minutes
    >until they were tender and then threw in the rest of the head of
    >cauliflower and cooked until it was tender.
    >
    >I drained the cauliflower and whipped it up with some butter, sour
    >cream, salt, pepper and parsley.
    >
    >It is quite yummy, much more flavor than a bland white cauliflower
    >puree. I used a hand
    >mixer to beat the cauliflower and the green parts and stems did not
    >whip up totally and the whole thing looked more like a colcannon.
    >
    >I figure it's got way more vitamins, minerals and fiber....plus it's
    >GOOD.


    Seems to me that what you did is use a machine to eat the cauliflower
    and **** it out before you ate it.

  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: A different cauliflower puree.

    On Jan 14, 6:28*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    >
    > Seems to me that what you did is use a machine to eat the cauliflower
    > and **** it out before you ate it.


    I like mashed cauliflower. This is another way to make it. Maybe
    you would like it if you tried it.

  4. #4
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: A different cauliflower puree.

    On Sun, 15 Jan 2012 12:50:53 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Jan 14, 6:28*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Seems to me that what you did is use a machine to eat the cauliflower
    >> and **** it out before you ate it.

    >
    >I like mashed cauliflower. This is another way to make it. Maybe
    >you would like it if you tried it.


    My favorite way to eat cauliflower is raw, marinated... if cooked,
    very minimally, drizzled with butter. Cauliflower flowerettes go well
    marinated in salad, even a 50/50 potato salad. I just don't see the
    point to buying a lovely/beautiful fresh cauliflower and cook it to
    death and then to add insult to injury compost it into mush... to me
    that would be tantamount to buying a USDA Prime beef rib roast and
    grinding it for sloppy joes. Perhaps you have rotten teeth. If I
    needed to eat a low carb mashie I might go rutabaga, however I prefer
    that raw too, great crudite for a clam dip. Perhaps you should shop
    the Gerber's and Beechnut aisle and work up to junior foods.
    Caulilower grows well on Lung Guyland's east end. I'd buy large ones
    with loads of leaves attached. Stuff the head with seasoned bread
    crumbs, knobs of butter, and tie the leaves tight about. Then roast
    in a 375F oven for about an hour, basting occasionally with the
    browned butter in the pan. Was so good I'd bake them two at a time
    being careful not to over cook. Raw cauliflower cores are a special
    treat.

  5. #5
    aem Guest

    Default Re: A different cauliflower puree.

    On Jan 15, 2:54*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > On Sun, 15 Jan 2012 12:50:53 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags

    ..........
    > >I like mashed cauliflower. * This is another way to make it. * *Maybe
    > >you would like it if you tried it.

    >
    > My favorite way to eat cauliflower is raw, marinated... if cooked,
    > very minimally, drizzled with butter. *Cauliflower flowerettes go well
    > marinated in salad, even a 50/50 potato salad. *I just don't see the
    > point to buying a lovely/beautiful fresh cauliflower and cook it to
    > death and then to add insult to injury compost it into mush.


    It's also good lightly dredged in flour and deep fried until light
    golden brown and delicious. Salt it immediately after frying and
    draining. Even kids like it. -aem



  6. #6
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: A different cauliflower puree.


    "ImStillMags" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I decided to make a cauliflower puree to go with the pot roast I was
    > making today.
    >
    > As I was pulling the stem and green parts off the head, I started
    > looking at the green stems and decided ,.... why had I been throwing
    > this perfectly good part of a cauliflower away all these years.
    > So, I cut the leaves and stems....the part of the stems that were not
    > woody....off and chopped them up and put them in the pot I was going
    > to cook the cauliflower in. I simmered them for about 10 minutes
    > until they were tender and then threw in the rest of the head of
    > cauliflower and cooked until it was tender.
    >
    > I drained the cauliflower and whipped it up with some butter, sour
    > cream, salt, pepper and parsley.
    >
    > It is quite yummy, much more flavor than a bland white cauliflower
    > puree. I used a hand mixer to beat the cauliflower and the green parts
    > and stems did not
    > whip up totally and the whole thing looked more like a colcannon.
    >
    > I figure it's got way more vitamins, minerals and fiber....plus it's
    > GOOD.
    >


    Sounds tasty. I like roasted whole cauliflower patted with breadcrumbs
    seasoned with herbs for a different side dish.

    Jill


  7. #7
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: A different cauliflower puree.

    On 1/16/2012 8:27 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > "ImStillMags" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> I decided to make a cauliflower puree to go with the pot roast I was
    >> making today.
    >>
    >> As I was pulling the stem and green parts off the head, I started
    >> looking at the green stems and decided ,.... why had I been throwing
    >> this perfectly good part of a cauliflower away all these years.
    >> So, I cut the leaves and stems....the part of the stems that were not
    >> woody....off and chopped them up and put them in the pot I was going
    >> to cook the cauliflower in. I simmered them for about 10 minutes
    >> until they were tender and then threw in the rest of the head of
    >> cauliflower and cooked until it was tender.
    >>
    >> I drained the cauliflower and whipped it up with some butter, sour
    >> cream, salt, pepper and parsley.
    >>
    >> It is quite yummy, much more flavor than a bland white cauliflower
    >> puree. I used a hand mixer to beat the cauliflower and the green parts
    >> and stems did not
    >> whip up totally and the whole thing looked more like a colcannon.
    >>
    >> I figure it's got way more vitamins, minerals and fiber....plus it's
    >> GOOD.
    >>

    >
    > Sounds tasty. I like roasted whole cauliflower patted with breadcrumbs
    > seasoned with herbs for a different side dish.
    >
    > Jill


    I've never tried that but I must do it tho' the amount of stem is
    usually small.

    A little OT but I don't like the related broccoli apart from the
    stems. You can get more "broccoli" stem by eating broccolini.

    --
    Jim Silverton

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

  8. #8
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: A different cauliflower puree.

    James wrote:

    > I don't like the related broccoli apart from the stems.


    I recently ran across a rather bizarre treatment of broccoli florets: In
    _Volt, ink._, one of the authors cuts the tiny florets off broccoli and
    dehydrates them, then deep-fries the dehydrated florets. According to him,
    they pop like little kernels of popcorn. I haven't tried it (although in a
    related note, when I made last year's Thanksgiving mole amaranto, I learned
    that amaranth grains also pop like tiny popcorn).

    Bob



  9. #9
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: A different cauliflower puree.

    On Jan 14, 9:28*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:


    > Seems to me that what you did is use a machine to eat the cauliflower
    > and **** it out before you ate it.




    LOL. Truth is though, sometimes veggies can taste pretty good
    cooked down. It's a matter of taste, of course - or so it should be -
    not a matter for the food police. Perhaps you'd like a gig as the
    lone negative voice in a tv infomercial, or as a guest commentator on
    a food show whose host claims to be the most fair-minded cook in the
    world and welcomes all comments, good and bad. Right now these shows
    use only positive sounding tasters, all actors of course, all paid, of
    course.

    But the day will come when too many of these shows use that same
    tiresome formula and one of them will have to break out and take a
    chance on paying someone to play the negative role. After maybe 15
    people have tasted the finished dish, each of them oohing and aahing
    their through each bite, they come to you for your assessment. "Pure
    trash", is your response after a few unswallowed munches. "Never.
    Never would I pay to eat THAT!" ....... How about it brooklyn1,
    would you like that gig? I am starting a new tv food show this fall
    and could use a negative taster on my staff. You can say anything
    want about the food on the show - no words will be censored. You can
    rip the food apart. You can even puke directly into the camera. But
    it has to be real. Your negative comments cannot be false. We will
    have you hooked up to a lie detector machine the whole while, and if
    we find out you're lying about the taste of our food just to get
    attention for yourself by being the bad guy, well, then I'm afraid
    we'll have to let you go.

    TJ

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