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Thread: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

  1. #1
    Dan S. Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    FERRANTE, if I was in the mood, I'd turn the lights down low and reply
    with soft music, but you'll have to accept this instead::
    > What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    > sauce?
    >
    > Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?
    >
    > Mark


    Maranira is a tomato based sauce that can be put on pasta or can be
    used in a number of different ways. It's just blanched, peeled, diced
    tomatoes, sauteed onions in olive oil, salt, pepper (red or black or
    both), and your basic Italian herbs (thyme, oregano, and basil).
    Simmer it and maybe thicken it with some tomato paste. Parmesan cheese
    is an excellent accompaniment. There is no meat in marinera sauce.

    "Pasta sauce" is a generic term. It can be anything from butter or
    olive oil to pesto or marinara or meat sauce.

    --
    Yours,
    Dan S.
    the unruly redshirt



  2. #2
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:58:19 -0500, FERRANTE
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    >sauce?
    >
    >Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?


    Dunno the difference, but I do know that Harry's Tomato Sauce is one
    of the very best things you can put on spaghetti.


    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Harry's Tomato Sauce

    Recipe By :Harry Demidavicius
    Serving Size : 10 Preparation Time 15
    Categories : Sauces/Gravies

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 large carrot -- cut in large chunks
    1 stalk celery -- cut in large chunks
    1 medium onion -- cut in large chunks
    1 clove garlic
    1/4 cup olive oil
    1 tablespoon dried oregano
    1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)
    28 ounces Italian tomatoes -- crushed
    1 cup dry red wine
    1/4 cup fresh parsley -- minced

    1. Blend the carrot, celery, onion, garlic, oil, and oregano in a food
    processor until emulsified.

    2. Empty the tomatoes into a large saucepan on medium heat and mash
    them. Stir in the vegetable mixture. The resulting blend should be
    quite thick & look reddish with traces of green & yellow visible. When
    it starts to bubble turn down the heat & simmer uncovered for about
    90 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it has reduced & blended into
    a sauce.

    3. Add in the wine and continue to simmer for a few more minutes. Stir
    in the parsley simmer for 5 more minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings
    and remove from heat.

    4. The sauce may now be served over pasta or stored in the
    refrigerator in tightly capped 28 ounce jars.

    Cuisine:
    "Italian"

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 90 Calories; 6g Fat (64.7%
    calories from fat); 1g Protein; 6g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 0mg
    Cholesterol; 29mg Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 1 Vegetable; 1
    Fat.

    --
    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  3. #3
    FERRANTE Guest

    Default Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    sauce?

    Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?

    Mark

  4. #4
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    FERRANTE wrote:
    > What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    > sauce?
    >
    > Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?
    >
    > Mark


    there is no definition for what you're calling "basic pasta sauce"
    What is basic to you, might not be to someone else. It might not even
    contain tomato, but a marinara sauce does.

  5. #5
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

    > Dunno the difference, but I do know that Harry's Tomato Sauce is one
    > of the very best things you can put on spaghetti.
    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Harry's Tomato Sauce
    >
    > Recipe By :Harry Demidavicius
    > Serving Size : 10 Preparation Time 15
    > Categories : Sauces/Gravies
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 1 large carrot -- cut in large chunks
    > 1 stalk celery -- cut in large chunks
    > 1 medium onion -- cut in large chunks
    > 1 clove garlic
    > 1/4 cup olive oil
    > 1 tablespoon dried oregano
    > 1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)
    > 28 ounces Italian tomatoes -- crushed
    > 1 cup dry red wine
    > 1/4 cup fresh parsley -- minced
    >
    > 1. Blend the carrot, celery, onion, garlic, oil, and oregano in a food
    > processor until emulsified.
    >
    > 2. Empty the tomatoes into a large saucepan on medium heat and mash
    > them. Stir in the vegetable mixture. The resulting blend should be
    > quite thick & look reddish with traces of green & yellow visible. When
    > it starts to bubble turn down the heat & simmer uncovered for about
    > 90 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it has reduced & blended into
    > a sauce.
    >
    > 3. Add in the wine and continue to simmer for a few more minutes. Stir
    > in the parsley simmer for 5 more minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings
    > and remove from heat.
    >
    > 4. The sauce may now be served over pasta or stored in the
    > refrigerator in tightly capped 28 ounce jars.


    Thanks for that one, Carol.

    How are you and Crash doing?

    --
    Janet Wilder
    way-the-heck-south Texas
    spelling doesn't count
    but cooking does

  6. #6
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?


    "FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    > sauce?
    >
    >

    Marinara sauce contains no meat... if used on a dish containing meat then it
    is no longer marinara sauce.



  7. #7
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?


    "Goomba" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > FERRANTE wrote:
    >> What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    >> sauce?
    >>
    >> Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?
    >>
    >> Mark

    >
    > there is no definition for what you're calling "basic pasta sauce"
    > What is basic to you, might not be to someone else. It might not even
    > contain tomato, but a marinara sauce does.


    Are you positive you're Italian?

    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-marinara-sauce.htm
    "Marinara sauce originated with sailors in Naples in the 16th century, after
    the Spaniards introduced the tomato to their neighboring countries. The word
    marinara is derived from marinaro, which is Italian for "of the sea."
    Because of this, many people mistakenly believe marinara sauce includes some
    type of fish or seafood. However, marinara sauce loosely translates as "the
    sauce of the sailors," because it was a meatless sauce extensively used on
    sailing ships before modern refrigeration techniques were invented. The lack
    of meat and the sheer simplicity of making tasty marinara sauce were
    particularly appealing to the cooks on board sailing ships, because the high
    acid content of the tomatoes and the absence of any type of meat fat
    resulted in a sauce which would not easily spoil."



  8. #8
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?


    "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:58:19 -0500, FERRANTE
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    >>sauce?
    >>
    >>Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?

    >
    > Dunno the difference, but I do know that Harry's Tomato Sauce is one
    > of the very best things you can put on spaghetti.
    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Harry's Tomato Sauce
    >
    > Recipe By :Harry Demidavicius
    > Serving Size : 10 Preparation Time 15
    > Categories : Sauces/Gravies
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 1 large carrot -- cut in large chunks
    > 1 stalk celery -- cut in large chunks
    > 1 medium onion -- cut in large chunks
    > 1 clove garlic
    > 1/4 cup olive oil
    > 1 tablespoon dried oregano
    > 1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)
    > 28 ounces Italian tomatoes -- crushed
    > 1 cup dry red wine
    > 1/4 cup fresh parsley -- minced
    >
    > 1. Blend the carrot, celery, onion, garlic, oil, and oregano in a food
    > processor until emulsified.
    >
    > 2. Empty the tomatoes into a large saucepan on medium heat and mash
    > them. Stir in the vegetable mixture. The resulting blend should be
    > quite thick & look reddish with traces of green & yellow visible. When
    > it starts to bubble turn down the heat & simmer uncovered for about
    > 90 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it has reduced & blended into
    > a sauce.
    >
    > 3. Add in the wine and continue to simmer for a few more minutes. Stir
    > in the parsley simmer for 5 more minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings
    > and remove from heat.
    >
    > 4. The sauce may now be served over pasta or stored in the
    > refrigerator in tightly capped 28 ounce jars.
    >

    I mince the onions, celery, carrot and garlic and sauté that a bit until the
    celery and onion are soft. That softens the onion taste, and the garlic is a
    bit less harsh. Then I add any seasoning and proceed pretty much as above.
    Also, if you want a sauce that's a bit more delicate, try white wine instead
    of red wine. An inexpensive vermouth works great. That hint came from the
    goddess of Italian cooking, Marcella Hazan.

    Ed




  9. #9
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 20:58:07 -0500, FERRANTE
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I prefer jarred pasta sauces even though I know homemade would be
    >better. I usually stuck with Barilla or Classico as I hate Ragu' and
    >Prego. Now I see that supermarkets are carrying pasta sauces in foil
    >pouches in the freezer section. Just heat up and pour over your
    >favorite pasta. I may try that soon.


    I feel the same about Ragu and Prego. Barilla is my convenience
    spaghetti sauce of choice. Finances usually dictate using Hunt's
    canned sauces. Cheap, and definitely better than those other two.

    >I think I will try the Harry's Tomato Sauce recipe that was included
    >in this thread.


    You won't be sorry you did. It is wonderful stuff!

    Carol

    --
    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:45:04 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    <carol-56invalid@char[email protected]> wrote:

    > 1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)


    I thought you didn't like Italian sausage because of the fennel seeds.
    Am I not remembering correctly?


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  11. #11
    FERRANTE Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 22:41:23 GMT, "brooklyn1"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"FERRANTE" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    >> sauce?
    >>
    >>

    >Marinara sauce contains no meat... if used on a dish containing meat then it
    >is no longer marinara sauce.
    >


    While I love to add all kinds of things to jarred pasta sauce, every
    once in a while I just want pasta and a basic tomato sauce and someone
    suggested using marinara instead.

    I prefer jarred pasta sauces even though I know homemade would be
    better. I usually stuck with Barilla or Classico as I hate Ragu' and
    Prego. Now I see that supermarkets are carrying pasta sauces in foil
    pouches in the freezer section. Just heat up and pour over your
    favorite pasta. I may try that soon.

    I think I will try the Harry's Tomato Sauce recipe that was included
    in this thread.

    Mark

  12. #12
    FERRANTE Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:45:04 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:58:19 -0500, FERRANTE
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    >>sauce?
    >>
    >>Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?

    >
    >Dunno the difference, but I do know that Harry's Tomato Sauce is one
    >of the very best things you can put on spaghetti.


    Thanks!

    Mark

  13. #13
    Damsel in dis Dress Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 18:41:29 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:45:04 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> 1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)

    >
    >I thought you didn't like Italian sausage because of the fennel seeds.
    >Am I not remembering correctly?


    I adore fennel seeds. I always have both whole and ground fennel
    seeds on hand. Must be someone else.

    Carol

    --
    Change "invalid" to JamesBond's agent number to reply.

  14. #14
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Damsel in dis Dress <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 18:41:29 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:45:04 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    > ><[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> 1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)

    > >
    > >I thought you didn't like Italian sausage because of the fennel seeds.
    > >Am I not remembering correctly?

    >
    > I adore fennel seeds. I always have both whole and ground fennel
    > seeds on hand. Must be someone else.


    I thought we used to have somebody on rfc who didn't like fennel, but we
    all got together and drummed them out of here.

    :-)

    Just kidding, of course. My father used to keep a pepper grinder on the
    table in the kitchen, loaded with fennel seeds. He'd add a couple of
    grinds to all sorts of food.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  15. #15
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 20:35:15 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 20:58:07 -0500, FERRANTE
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I prefer jarred pasta sauces even though I know homemade would be
    >>better. I usually stuck with Barilla or Classico as I hate Ragu' and
    >>Prego. Now I see that supermarkets are carrying pasta sauces in foil
    >>pouches in the freezer section. Just heat up and pour over your
    >>favorite pasta. I may try that soon.

    >
    >I feel the same about Ragu and Prego. Barilla is my convenience
    >spaghetti sauce of choice. Finances usually dictate using Hunt's
    >canned sauces. Cheap, and definitely better than those other two.
    >

    Have you ever tried Classico? I haven't tried the pasta sauce, but I
    use their tomato "pesto" as pizza sauce and it's very good.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  16. #16
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    FERRANTE <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    > sauce?


    None, as neither exists, in true culinary terms.

    There is an endless variety of sauces, regional or seasonal, served with
    pasta, many of them simple or basic enough.

    As to the "marinara sauce," there is no such thing as "salsa marinara"
    in Italy. It is a peculiarly American phenomenon derived directly from
    the topping of pizza marinara, namely tomatoes, oregano and garlic
    (needless to say, the topping is not a sauce). In Italy, there are
    numerous unrelated "alla marinara" preparations - not always, or even
    frequently - sauces, many of them involving some kind of fish, seafood,
    or fish broth or stock, and often some tomato sauce and herbs. You will
    have trouble finding any "salsa marinara" recipes in any cookbooks
    written by Italians for Italians in Italian. If you do a Web search for
    occurrences of "salsa marinara" in Italian language on ".it" or other
    Italian Web sites, you will find preciously few, like maybe a dozen or
    so, and some will mention fish stock in the context.

    For example, Il Ricettario (The Recipe Book) compiled by the Accademia
    Italiana della Cucina and containing 2,000 recipes lists three "alla
    marinara" recipes: Risotta alla marinara (Sicilia) with assorted
    seafood, tomato sauce and cheese among other ingredients; Tonno alla
    marinara (Sicilia) with tunny fish and no pasta involved; and Guazzetto
    alla marinara (Abruzzo) with assorted fish and no pasta involved. You
    can look it up at
    <http://www.accademiaitalianacucina.it/inglese/indricette.html>.

    In Italy, concoctions which may resemble the American "marinara" are
    called "al pomodoro" or "alla pomarola", or, in and around Naples, "alla
    pummarola" or specifically "vermicielli co le pommadoro" in the local
    dialect.

    Here is a simple preparation popular in the Po Valley, with the sauce
    prepared with butter, not oil. The recipe is adapted from _Aus Italiens
    Küchen_ by Marianne Kaltenbach and Virginia Cerabolini (who is from
    Pavia).

    Pasta (for example penne or rigatoni) al pomodoro col burro
    serves 4

    100 g (3,5 oz) butter
    1/2 onion, finely chopped
    2 bay leaves
    1 tin/can (800 g; 28 oz) peeled pelati (peeled Italian tomatoes)
    salt
    500 g (17.5 oz) pasta (rigatoni or penne)
    fresh ground black pepper to taste

    Melt half of the butter in a saucepan over heat. Remove from heat, add
    the onions and the bay leaves and mix well. Add the tomatoes and reduce
    a bit over high heat. Put the rest of the butter in a deep, pre-warmed
    bowl and add the pasta, which have been meanwhile cooked al dente and
    drained. Add half of the sauce and half of the cheese and mix well.
    Put the rest of the sauce on top. Put the rest of the cheese and the
    pepper mill on the table for people to serve themselves.

    Victor

  17. #17
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 20:35:15 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 20:58:07 -0500, FERRANTE
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>I prefer jarred pasta sauces even though I know homemade would be
    >>>better. I usually stuck with Barilla or Classico as I hate Ragu' and
    >>>Prego. Now I see that supermarkets are carrying pasta sauces in foil
    >>>pouches in the freezer section. Just heat up and pour over your
    >>>favorite pasta. I may try that soon.

    >>
    >>I feel the same about Ragu and Prego. Barilla is my convenience
    >>spaghetti sauce of choice. Finances usually dictate using Hunt's
    >>canned sauces. Cheap, and definitely better than those other two.
    >>

    > Have you ever tried Classico? I haven't tried the pasta sauce, but I
    > use their tomato "pesto" as pizza sauce and it's very good.
    >
    >

    I like the Paul Newman sauces. The tomato and basil sauce is very tasty.
    And the proceeds go to charity.

    Jill


  18. #18
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:45:04 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

    > On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:58:19 -0500, FERRANTE
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    >>sauce?
    >>
    >>Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?

    >
    > Dunno the difference, but I do know that Harry's Tomato Sauce is one
    > of the very best things you can put on spaghetti.
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Harry's Tomato Sauce


    <snip recipe>
    >
    > 4. The sauce may now be served over pasta or stored in the
    > refrigerator in tightly capped 28 ounce jars.
    >

    so this will keep o.k. in the refrigerator? the commercial stuff says use
    within a week after opening, i think.

    your pal,
    blake

  19. #19
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 18:28:57 -0700, Theron wrote:

    > "Damsel in dis Dress" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:58:19 -0500, FERRANTE
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>What is the difference between a marinara sauce and a basic pasta
    >>>sauce?
    >>>
    >>>Anyone have a good recipe for a simple marinara sauce, please?

    >>
    >> Dunno the difference, but I do know that Harry's Tomato Sauce is one
    >> of the very best things you can put on spaghetti.
    >>
    >>
    >> * Exported from MasterCook *
    >>
    >> Harry's Tomato Sauce
    >>

    <recipe snipped>

    > I mince the onions, celery, carrot and garlic and sauté that a bit until the
    > celery and onion are soft. That softens the onion taste, and the garlic is a
    > bit less harsh. Then I add any seasoning and proceed pretty much as above.
    > Also, if you want a sauce that's a bit more delicate, try white wine instead
    > of red wine. An inexpensive vermouth works great. That hint came from the
    > goddess of Italian cooking, Marcella Hazan.
    >
    > Ed


    thanks for the tips, ed, especially about the wine. martini & rossi i have
    on hand, red wine would be a special purchase.

    your pal,
    blake

  20. #20
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Difference between marinara & pasta sauce?

    On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 21:08:51 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress wrote:

    > On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 18:41:29 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 20 Mar 2009 15:45:04 -0500, Damsel in dis Dress
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> 1/4 teaspoon ground fennel -- (Carol's addition)

    >>
    >>I thought you didn't like Italian sausage because of the fennel seeds.
    >>Am I not remembering correctly?

    >
    > I adore fennel seeds. I always have both whole and ground fennel
    > seeds on hand. Must be someone else.
    >
    > Carol


    sounds like a detective movie: 'we know this woman is an imposter because
    fennel seeds always got in the *real* damsel's teeth! take her away,
    boys!'

    your pal,
    blake

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