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Thread: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

  1. #1
    Omelet Guest

  2. #2
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:09:33 -0600, Omelet wrote:

    > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > I disagree.
    >
    > Opinions?
    >
    > What do y'all feel are the major differences?


    i'd say the most salient difference is that japanese food is more
    'delicate,' if you will, and maybe less reliant on cooked sauces and
    gravies. and china encompasses many 'schools' of cooking.

    your pal,
    blake

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:09:33 -0600, Omelet wrote:

    > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > I disagree.
    >
    > Opinions?
    >
    > What do y'all feel are the major differences?


    Pretty much everything. No sense arguing with dad.

    -sw

  4. #4
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:09:33 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    >I disagree.
    >
    >Opinions?
    >
    >What do y'all feel are the major differences?


    Depends what you mean by Chinese and Japanese cooking... do you mean
    what they cook in China and Japan or what's served in typical
    Chinese/Japanese US eateries.

  5. #5
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > I disagree.
    >
    > Opinions?
    >
    > What do y'all feel are the major differences?


    I'm not getting in the middle of this one!

    What I *will* throw out is that it seems like Chinese food is different
    than Chinese food, and I understand that the Chinese food in China isn't
    the same as what is served in the US.

    It's like the US. I've lived my whole 60 years in the US, but I've
    never eaten grits. I understand from many people, that in some areas of
    the US, grits are eaten every day.

    ObGrits: I didn't even know where to *buy* grits. Bob T. said just go
    to the local grocery store. Sure enough, they were right there, and I
    bought some. Now I just have to cook them and try them. I'm sure I
    will like them, since I like All Things Corn.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  6. #6
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    Omelet wrote on Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:09:33 -0600:

    > Opinions?


    > What do y'all feel are the major differences?


    Sorry, Om, I accidentally replied to you personally :-)

    >The various Chinese cuisines form a vast spread of remarkable dishes.
    >Tho' I like it, Japanese is much less inventive and necessarily
    >parochial
    >and was based on a society that did not emphasize cooking. It's a bit
    >like comparing Scottish and French cuisine.

    ..

    >I'll admit that I am a sushi enthusiast but is that "cooking"?





    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 11:08:30 -0700, Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > ObGrits: I didn't even know where to *buy* grits. Bob T. said just go
    > to the local grocery store. Sure enough, they were right there, and I
    > bought some. Now I just have to cook them and try them. I'm sure I
    > will like them, since I like All Things Corn.


    It's amazing what things literally jump off the shelf at you when you
    know to look for them. I never saw Better Than Bullion until after Om
    sent me a couple of jars. All of a sudden, there they were... large
    as life, sitting on the shelf right where they belonged!

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  8. #8
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    On Mar 14, 8:09 am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > I disagree.


    Tell your dad that they are so different in so many ways that the
    folks at rfc couldn't even begin to enumerate them. Point out that
    China is very large with many distinct regions as to climate,
    geography and foods that are locally available, while Japan is a small
    island country. It would be amazing if such different resources
    produced similar cuisines.

    Of course there are some overlaps and some similarities because they
    are old cultures that have interacted for many centuries, but the
    differences far outweigh the sharings. -aem


  9. #9
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > I disagree.
    >
    > Opinions?
    >
    > What do y'all feel are the major differences?
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    > "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their
    > foot down."
    > --Steve Rothstein
    >
    > Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    > [email protected]
    > Subscribe: [email protected]




    Aside from culture and politics? LOL

    Recipes:

    Egg Drop Soup [Dahn Far Tong - China]

    4 c. chicken stock
    2 Tbs. chinese wine or dry sherry
    1 tsp. sesame oil
    salt to taste
    3 eggs, lightly beaten
    3 Tbs. chopped spring (green) onions

    Bring the stock to a boil; add wine and sesame oil. Taste and add salt if
    needed. Season beaten eggs with 1/2 tsp. salt. Pour beaten eggs slowly
    into the boiling stock, stirring once or twice. Serve immediately,
    sprinkled with spring onions.

    Egg Flower Soup [Kakitama-Jiru - Japan]

    5 c. dashi or chicken stock
    8 snow pea pods
    2 tbs. Japanese soy sauce
    2 eggs
    1/2 tsp. salt

    Bring stock to a boil and add the snow peas. Cook for 1 minute after the
    liquid returns to the boil then add the soy sauce. Beat eggs lightly with
    salt and pour slowly into boiling stock, stirring gently. Ladel soup into
    bowls and serve immediately.

    From Charmain Soloman's 'The Complete Asian Cookbook'.

    Jill


  10. #10
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    On Mar 14, 1:08 pm, Dan Abel <da...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > In article <ompomelet-7D205C.10093314032...@news-wc.giganews.com>,
    >
    > Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > > I disagree.

    >
    > > Opinions?

    >
    > > What do y'all feel are the major differences?

    >
    > I'm not getting in the middle of this one!
    >
    > What I *will* throw out is that it seems like Chinese food is different
    > than Chinese food, and I understand that the Chinese food in China isn't
    > the same as what is served in the US.
    >
    > It's like the US. I've lived my whole 60 years in the US, but I've
    > never eaten grits. I understand from many people, that in some areas of
    > the US, grits are eaten every day.
    >
    > ObGrits: I didn't even know where to *buy* grits. Bob T. said just go
    > to the local grocery store. Sure enough, they were right there, and I
    > bought some. Now I just have to cook them and try them. I'm sure I
    > will like them, since I like All Things Corn.
    >
    > --
    > Dan Abel
    > Petaluma, California USA
    > da...@sonic.net


    At the risk of serioius drift - eat them grits Dan. Simple, but work
    for every meal. Think polenta,

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    In article <16iy2muw8uiox$.[email protected]>,
    blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:09:33 -0600, Omelet wrote:
    >
    > > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > > I disagree.
    > >
    > > Opinions?
    > >
    > > What do y'all feel are the major differences?

    >
    > i'd say the most salient difference is that japanese food is more
    > 'delicate,' if you will, and maybe less reliant on cooked sauces and
    > gravies. and china encompasses many 'schools' of cooking.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    Yeah. James e-mailed me and commented to the effect that Chinese cuisine
    has a lot more cultural variations.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    In article <8aga3h21x0fw$.[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:09:33 -0600, Omelet wrote:
    >
    > > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > > I disagree.
    > >
    > > Opinions?
    > >
    > > What do y'all feel are the major differences?

    >
    > Pretty much everything. No sense arguing with dad.
    >
    > -sw


    <snort> True dat. I just need to get a good cookbook on Japanese
    cooking. Many Westerners think that it's all about Sushi, but there is
    so much more to it than that.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    brooklyn1 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:09:33 -0600, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > >I disagree.
    > >
    > >Opinions?
    > >
    > >What do y'all feel are the major differences?

    >
    > Depends what you mean by Chinese and Japanese cooking... do you mean
    > what they cook in China and Japan or what's served in typical
    > Chinese/Japanese US eateries.


    I meant the real stuff. It's like I'm well aware that Mexican food in
    the US is nothing like the "real" Mexican food served in central Mexico.
    There is even a big difference in "Tex-mex" and what is common close to
    the border in California.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  14. #14
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > > I disagree.
    > >
    > > Opinions?
    > >
    > > What do y'all feel are the major differences?

    >
    > I'm not getting in the middle of this one!


    Why not? :-) Could be fun and it's on topic!
    >
    > What I *will* throw out is that it seems like Chinese food is different
    > than Chinese food, and I understand that the Chinese food in China isn't
    > the same as what is served in the US.


    No surprise.
    >
    > It's like the US. I've lived my whole 60 years in the US, but I've
    > never eaten grits. I understand from many people, that in some areas of
    > the US, grits are eaten every day.


    It's a Southern thing and I've only ever used them for fire and poison.
    I'm originally from California, altho' I've adapted for the most part.
    <g>
    Been in Texas now for 28 years. That's well over 1/2 my lifetime.
    >
    > ObGrits: I didn't even know where to *buy* grits. Bob T. said just go
    > to the local grocery store. Sure enough, they were right there, and I
    > bought some. Now I just have to cook them and try them. I'm sure I
    > will like them, since I like All Things Corn.


    Think "Polenta". <g>
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  15. #15
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > I disagree.
    >
    > Opinions?
    >
    > What do y'all feel are the major differences?
    > --
    > Peace! Om


    Very big difference..

    One very simple fact - look at the size of Japan and the size of China -
    Japan has a central type of cusine whereas China has 8 distinct types:


    --
    Dimitri

    Searing

    http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com.

    http://www.chinese-culture.net/html/chinese_food.html

    The Northern (Shandong, Beijing)
    type is known for its preparation of dried products such as shrimp, scallops
    and sea cucumber. Noodles, dumplings and buns tend to be a staple diet. It
    is best known for Peking duck.

    Sichuan Cuisine
    Sichuan food features hearty cooking flavoured with an exotic palette of
    spices: red and black pepper, sesame paste, flower pepper and fermented bean
    paste. Sichuan dishes are known to be "ma la hot" or "tongue burning
    spicy-hot."

    Canton Cuisine
    The Cantonese cuisine is perhaps the most famous of the various Chinese
    cuisine. The world outside is in fact most familiar with Cantonese cuisine,
    having spread far and wide across the world by intrepid Chinese chefs from
    Hong Kong who have migrated to various parts of the world. Canonese cuisine
    is famous for its remarkable range of refined ingredients cooked with a
    light touch, featuring roast meats, oyster sauce, black beans and shrimp
    paste. Cantonese dishes are well known for their freshness, tenderness and
    smoothness.

    Jiangsu Cuisine
    The Jiangsu type food can be classified into that of Suzhou-Wuxi style and
    Zhenjiang-Yangzhou style. The feature of Suzhou-style dishes is their
    natural flavour in original stock and a mixture of salty and sweet taste.
    The characteristics of Zhenjiang-Yangzhou style food are best described by
    the saying that the soup is so clear that you can see the bottom of the bowl
    and the sauce is so thick that it turns creamy white.

    Zhejiang Cuisine
    Zhejiang food is represented by Hangzhou, Ningbo and Shaoxing styles. Dishes
    of Hangzhou style are meticulously prepared, hence tasty and crisp. A blend
    of freshness and saltiness characterize dishes of Ningbo style. Steamed and
    roasted seafood is Ningbo's specialty. Shaoxing hood, with poultry as its
    main specialty, is palatable, crisp and glutinous.

    Hunan Cuisine
    Hunan food takes curing, simmering, steaming and stewing as the main cooking
    methods. Dishes of this style are usually tinged with sour and spicy flavor
    and are thoroughly cooked.

    Anhui Cuisine
    Anhui style food features dishes stewed in brown sauce with stress on heavy
    oil and sauce. Delicacies are abundant in Anhui dishes.

    Fujian Cuisine
    Fujian dishes, mostly marinated in wine, are sourly sweet. They stress
    beautiful colors and fresh tastes. Seafood dishes are Fujian specialties.
    Taiwan is also famous for it's Fujian cuisine.
    In addition to the main categories of Chinese Cuisine, there are in fact a
    wide variety of sub-Cuisine developed in the many towns and villages of
    China and including the various Chinee communities spread throughout the
    world.


  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    In article <hnja4c$mgm$[email protected]>,
    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote on Sun, 14 Mar 2010 10:09:33 -0600:
    >
    > > Opinions?

    >
    > > What do y'all feel are the major differences?

    >
    > Sorry, Om, I accidentally replied to you personally :-)


    I didn't mind, and replied. Feel free to re-post my reply here. :-)

    > >The various Chinese cuisines form a vast spread of remarkable dishes.
    > >Tho' I like it, Japanese is much less inventive and necessarily
    > >parochial
    > >and was based on a society that did not emphasize cooking. It's a bit
    > >like comparing Scottish and French cuisine.

    > .
    >
    > >I'll admit that I am a sushi enthusiast but is that "cooking"?

    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  17. #17
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <sf@geemail.co[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 11:08:30 -0700, Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > ObGrits: I didn't even know where to *buy* grits. Bob T. said just go
    > > to the local grocery store. Sure enough, they were right there, and I
    > > bought some. Now I just have to cook them and try them. I'm sure I
    > > will like them, since I like All Things Corn.

    >
    > It's amazing what things literally jump off the shelf at you when you
    > know to look for them. I never saw Better Than Bullion until after Om
    > sent me a couple of jars. All of a sudden, there they were... large
    > as life, sitting on the shelf right where they belonged!


    <laughs> The packaging is different for sure!
    It freezes well by the way, and stays soft in the freezer if you need to
    store it longer.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    aem <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mar 14, 8:09 am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > > I disagree.

    >
    > Tell your dad that they are so different in so many ways that the
    > folks at rfc couldn't even begin to enumerate them. Point out that
    > China is very large with many distinct regions as to climate,
    > geography and foods that are locally available, while Japan is a small
    > island country. It would be amazing if such different resources
    > produced similar cuisines.
    >
    > Of course there are some overlaps and some similarities because they
    > are old cultures that have interacted for many centuries, but the
    > differences far outweigh the sharings. -aem


    Like the uses of rice and noodles?

    Thai cooking is a whole 'nuther world imho.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news[email protected]..
    > > Arguing with dad here, he says they are both pretty much the same.
    > > I disagree.
    > >
    > > Opinions?
    > >
    > > What do y'all feel are the major differences?

    >
    > Aside from culture and politics? LOL


    True dat'! :-)
    I'm trying to understand the culture better at the moment in order to do
    business with them. They are quite polite.

    And I see that there is not a lot of difference in the two recipes
    (thanks for posting them!)

    >
    > Recipes:
    >
    > Egg Drop Soup [Dahn Far Tong - China]
    >
    > 4 c. chicken stock
    > 2 Tbs. chinese wine or dry sherry
    > 1 tsp. sesame oil
    > salt to taste
    > 3 eggs, lightly beaten
    > 3 Tbs. chopped spring (green) onions
    >
    > Bring the stock to a boil; add wine and sesame oil. Taste and add salt if
    > needed. Season beaten eggs with 1/2 tsp. salt. Pour beaten eggs slowly
    > into the boiling stock, stirring once or twice. Serve immediately,
    > sprinkled with spring onions.
    >
    > Egg Flower Soup [Kakitama-Jiru - Japan]
    >
    > 5 c. dashi or chicken stock
    > 8 snow pea pods
    > 2 tbs. Japanese soy sauce
    > 2 eggs
    > 1/2 tsp. salt
    >
    > Bring stock to a boil and add the snow peas. Cook for 1 minute after the
    > liquid returns to the boil then add the soy sauce. Beat eggs lightly with
    > salt and pour slowly into boiling stock, stirring gently. Ladel soup into
    > bowls and serve immediately.
    >
    > From Charmain Soloman's 'The Complete Asian Cookbook'.
    >
    > Jill

    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  20. #20
    Omelet Guest

    Default Grits (was Re: Difference between Chinese and Japanese cooking?)

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    bulka <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > ObGrits: I didn't even know where to *buy* grits. Bob T. said just go
    > > to the local grocery store. Sure enough, they were right there, and I
    > > bought some. Now I just have to cook them and try them. I'm sure I
    > > will like them, since I like All Things Corn.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Dan Abel
    > > Petaluma, California USA
    > > da...@sonic.net

    >
    > At the risk of serioius drift - eat them grits Dan. Simple, but work
    > for every meal. Think polenta,


    <rofl> I told him the same thing, and I don't mind thread drift, but
    I'm going to change the subject line. :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

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