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Thread: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

  1. #1
    cybercat Guest

    Default Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

    I finally approached this 13-lb monster with my sharpest knife. I used the
    long skinny one.

    I used the "alternate method" shown in the pdf file in this link:

    http://tinyurl.com/cxq8z6

    It ought to be called the "common sense method" since you just follow the
    seams.

    I am roasting the center with an herb rub, slicing it thinly for sandwiches.

    http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Herb-Ru...st/Detail.aspx



  2. #2
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip


    "cybercat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:gq5s8n$vss$[email protected]..
    >I finally approached this 13-lb monster with my sharpest knife. I used the
    >long skinny one.
    >
    > I used the "alternate method" shown in the pdf file in this link:
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/cxq8z6
    >
    > It ought to be called the "common sense method" since you just follow the
    > seams.
    >
    > I am roasting the center with an herb rub, slicing it thinly for
    > sandwiches.
    >
    > http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Herb-Ru...st/Detail.aspx
    >


    Following up my own post because I have no shame:

    The center roast done as above, rubbed with the herb paste is AMAZING! I
    used four fresh garlic cloves instead of garlic powder, smashed and chopped.
    After an hour the roast was 145 degrees F, which says "rare" on my meat
    thermometer, so I put it back in for maybe 20 minutes since my husband will
    not eat rare meat. It sat and cooled while we ate potroast below, and when I
    sliced it, it was tender and juicy, with a single vein of mostly melted
    gristle running horizontally across the bottom third. Easily trimmed out of
    each thin slice, and now we have this very tender, moist, flavorful and LEAN
    seasoned sandwich meat! FOR 1.99 A POUND.

    I also made pot roast with chunks of the side of this thing. Browned hot and
    high and fast in a generous dollop of olive oil in a deep pot on the stove a
    few pieces at a time, then returned to the pot with maybe a cup of water,
    added pepper and onion powder, covered and when it boiled turned it to the
    second notch above low in my electric stovetop and left it for two hours.
    After two hours I dumped in a pound of baby carrots, lifting the meat up and
    placing it on top of the carrots so they would benefit from the dark beefy
    juice. I turned the pot up again and when it was going well, covered and
    turned it down, peeled and chunked four russet and put them in on top for
    the last 40 minutes, topping with salt and pepper.

    For gravy I tried something new--to me, at least. I poured most of the
    liquid off of the pot (fat, vegetable juice and all) in to a small sauce pan
    and made a slurry of corn starch and cold water, rather much corn starch in
    two juice-sized glasses, and stirred them in the boiling liquid. It is
    really good, just a bit of salt and pepper and I had a dark brown, beefy
    gravy with no lumps, not too thick, kind of clear looking instead of creamy
    as flour does. Poured in into a microwavable gravy boat/storage unit so we
    can heat and pour as we want it.

    Broc and cheese on the side, very nice, the broc chopped, frozen nuked until
    done then sprinkled generously with shredded sharp cheddar.



  3. #3
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

    cybercat wrote:
    > "cybercat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:gq5s8n$vss$[email protected]..
    >
    >> I finally approached this 13-lb monster with my sharpest knife. I used the
    >> long skinny one.
    >>
    >> I used the "alternate method" shown in the pdf file in this link:
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/cxq8z6
    >>
    >> It ought to be called the "common sense method" since you just follow the
    >> seams.
    >>
    >> I am roasting the center with an herb rub, slicing it thinly for
    >> sandwiches.
    >>
    >> http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Herb-Ru...st/Detail.aspx
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Following up my own post because I have no shame:
    >
    > The center roast done as above, rubbed with the herb paste is AMAZING! I
    > used four fresh garlic cloves instead of garlic powder, smashed and chopped.
    > After an hour the roast was 145 degrees F, which says "rare" on my meat
    > thermometer, so I put it back in for maybe 20 minutes since my husband will
    > not eat rare meat. It sat and cooled while we ate potroast below, and when I
    > sliced it, it was tender and juicy, with a single vein of mostly melted
    > gristle running horizontally across the bottom third. Easily trimmed out of
    > each thin slice, and now we have this very tender, moist, flavorful and LEAN
    > seasoned sandwich meat! FOR 1.99 A POUND.
    >
    > I also made pot roast with chunks of the side of this thing. Browned hot and
    > high and fast in a generous dollop of olive oil in a deep pot on the stove a
    > few pieces at a time, then returned to the pot with maybe a cup of water,
    > added pepper and onion powder, covered and when it boiled turned it to the
    > second notch above low in my electric stovetop and left it for two hours.
    > After two hours I dumped in a pound of baby carrots, lifting the meat up and
    > placing it on top of the carrots so they would benefit from the dark beefy
    > juice. I turned the pot up again and when it was going well, covered and
    > turned it down, peeled and chunked four russet and put them in on top for
    > the last 40 minutes, topping with salt and pepper.
    >
    > For gravy I tried something new--to me, at least. I poured most of the
    > liquid off of the pot (fat, vegetable juice and all) in to a small sauce pan
    > and made a slurry of corn starch and cold water, rather much corn starch in
    > two juice-sized glasses, and stirred them in the boiling liquid. It is
    > really good, just a bit of salt and pepper and I had a dark brown, beefy
    > gravy with no lumps, not too thick, kind of clear looking instead of creamy
    > as flour does. Poured in into a microwavable gravy boat/storage unit so we
    > can heat and pour as we want it.
    >
    > Broc and cheese on the side, very nice, the broc chopped, frozen nuked until
    > done then sprinkled generously with shredded sharp cheddar.
    >
    >
    >



    Sounds good, and it was only $1.99 per pound.


    Chicken and pork is inexpensive to purchase, but I wonder why beef costs
    more? I guess you have to feed cattle for a longer period of time.
    Chickens are only 8 weeks old, pigs are 6 months old.


    Becca

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

    cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Easily trimmed out of
    > each thin slice, and now we have this very tender, moist, flavorful and LEAN
    > seasoned sandwich meat! FOR 1.99 A POUND.


    We've heard about many if the dishes you've cooked and liked.
    Boasting about an extremely over-cooked sirloin tip roast unless you
    doesn't mean much. Given your reuputationyou probably just cost the
    Beef Industry about $21 million in bad publicity.

    Believing that 145F is rare instead of medium-well (according to
    your thermometer) doesn't give you any more credibility.

    -sw

  5. #5
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

    On Mar 23, 5:46*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > cybercat <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > > Easily trimmed out of
    > > each thin slice, and now we have this very tender, moist, flavorful andLEAN
    > > seasoned sandwich meat! FOR 1.99 A POUND.

    >
    > We've heard about many if the dishes you've cooked and liked.
    > Boasting about an extremely over-cooked sirloin tip roast unless you
    > doesn't mean much. *Given your reuputationyou probably just cost the
    > Beef Industry about $21 million in bad publicity.


    Most people know not to use a lean cut like that to make pot roast.
    Round roast shouldn't be cooked past MR.
    I use a well marbled hunk of chuck for pot roast.
    >
    > Believing that 145F is rare instead of medium-well (according to
    > your thermometer) doesn't give you any more credibility.


    It might have been a dollar store thermometer.
    >
    > -sw


    --Bryan

  6. #6
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Easily trimmed out of
    >> each thin slice, and now we have this very tender, moist, flavorful and
    >> LEAN
    >> seasoned sandwich meat! FOR 1.99 A POUND.

    >
    > We've heard about many if the dishes you've cooked and liked.
    > Boasting about an extremely over-cooked sirloin tip roast unless you
    > doesn't mean much. Given your reuputationyou probably just cost the
    > Beef Industry about $21 million in bad publicity.
    >
    > Believing that 145F is rare instead of medium-well (according to
    > your thermometer) doesn't give you any more credibility.
    >

    I am not looking for credibility, dumbass. I'm just sharing my experiences.
    I'm no authority, and don't want to be. You're the only one I see getting
    all puffed up over dumb **** like this. Once again ... I think it might be
    time for you to back away from the comptuter, or at least from Usenet for a
    a little while. You're taking yourself and it just a leetle too seriously.
    The day I look for "credibility" in a Usenet cooking group I sincerely hope
    someone shoots me in my head.



  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

    Bobo Bonobo® <CLASSAC[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mar 23, 5:46*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >> cybercat <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> Believing that 145F is rare instead of medium-well (according to
    >> your thermometer) doesn't give you any more credibility.

    >
    > It might have been a dollar store thermometer.


    In her defense, she did say 145F. But those are all calibrated
    15-20F too high per the USDA recommendations from 45 years ago.

    Cooking and acting have some a long way since then.

    -sw

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

    cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I think it might be
    > time for you to back away from the comptuter, or at least from Usenet for a
    > a little while. You're taking yourself and it just a leetle too seriously.


    I hadn't posted for 3 days. Every time I come back I think you're
    even more pathetic.

    I'll never stalk you like your newest buddy Greg, though.

    -sw

  9. #9
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Bobo Bonobo® <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Mar 23, 5:46 pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >>> cybercat <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Believing that 145F is rare instead of medium-well (according to
    >>> your thermometer) doesn't give you any more credibility.

    >>
    >> It might have been a dollar store thermometer.

    >
    > In her defense, she did say 145F. But those are all calibrated
    > 15-20F too high per the USDA recommendations from 45 years ago.
    >
    > Cooking and acting have some a long way since then.
    >


    And as long as I and my family enjoy what I cook, why the **** should I even
    begin to care about what a couple of no-lifes like you think of what or how
    I cook? Hmmmm, you ill-smelling limp-dicked mother****ers?

    It's okay. I'm smiling while I say that.



  10. #10
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

    Steve wrote:

    >>> cybercat <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Believing that 145F is rare instead of medium-well (according to
    >>> your thermometer) doesn't give you any more credibility.

    >>
    >> It might have been a dollar store thermometer.

    >
    > In her defense, she did say 145F. But those are all calibrated
    > 15-20F too high per the USDA recommendations from 45 years ago.
    >
    > Cooking and acting have some a long way since then.



    Well, I've got the cybertwat killfiled, but let me guess what happened: It
    posted some bull**** about cooking sirloin to 145F, called it "rare," and
    then pranced around like a Labrador proudly carrying a double-ended dildo it
    found in Sheldon's sofa.

    Was it something like that?

    cybertwat frequently affects great and unwarranted pride when it perpetrates
    disgusting ****ups like that. It *probably* realizes that it brewed up a
    nasty mess, but it's unwilling to admit its culinary incompetence. If it
    really thinks the stuff was good, then I pity cybertwat's mate even more
    than usual, because that foul **** is one of the BEST meals he's going to
    get.

    Bob


  11. #11
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip


    Sqwertz wrote:

    > cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I think it might be
    > > time for you to back away from the comptuter, or at least from Usenet

    for a
    > > a little while. You're taking yourself and it just a leetle too

    seriously.
    >
    > I hadn't posted for 3 days. Every time I come back I think you're
    > even more pathetic.
    >
    > I'll never stalk you like your newest buddy Greg, though.
    >



    ?????


    --
    Best
    Greg



  12. #12
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip


    "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > I think it might be
    >> > time for you to back away from the comptuter, or at least from Usenet

    > for a
    >> > a little while. You're taking yourself and it just a leetle too

    > seriously.
    >>
    >> I hadn't posted for 3 days. Every time I come back I think you're
    >> even more pathetic.
    >>
    >> I'll never stalk you like your newest buddy Greg, though.
    >>

    >
    >
    > ?????
    >
    >


    From the best I can tell, he's drinking too much again.



  13. #13
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip


    cybercat wrote:

    > "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > >
    > > Sqwertz wrote:
    > >
    > >> cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > I think it might be
    > >> > time for you to back away from the comptuter, or at least from Usenet

    > > for a
    > >> > a little while. You're taking yourself and it just a leetle too

    > > seriously.
    > >>
    > >> I hadn't posted for 3 days. Every time I come back I think you're
    > >> even more pathetic.
    > >>
    > >> I'll never stalk you like your newest buddy Greg, though.
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > ?????
    > >
    > >

    >
    > From the best I can tell, he's drinking too much again.



    Steve needs to r-e-l-a-x already, sheesh...


    --
    Best
    Greg



  14. #14
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

    cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >>> cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> > I think it might be
    >>> > time for you to back away from the comptuter, or at least from Usenet

    >> for a
    >>> > a little while. You're taking yourself and it just a leetle too

    >> seriously.
    >>>
    >>> I hadn't posted for 3 days. Every time I come back I think you're
    >>> even more pathetic.
    >>>
    >>> I'll never stalk you like your newest buddy Greg, though.

    >
    > From the best I can tell, he's drinking too much again.


    I really expect better zingers from you. Do you think this is
    supposed to offend me in some way?

    What next: thousand of lurkers support your lame efforts to
    humiliate me VIA email?

    You've really lost your touch.

    -sw

  15. #15
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

    cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > And as long as I and my family enjoy what I cook, why the **** should I even
    > begin to care about what a couple of no-lifes like you think of what or how
    > I cook? Hmmmm, you ill-smelling limp-dicked mother****ers?
    >
    > It's okay. I'm smiling while I say that.


    Limp dicks, like on she-males, turn you on do they??

    You forgot the "you all suck" line.

    -sw

  16. #16
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Cutting Up Whole Sirloin Tip

    On Mar 23, 7:16*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > Bobo Bonobo® <CLASS...@BRICK.NET> wrote:
    > > On Mar 23, 5:46*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > >> cybercat <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    > >> Believing that 145F is rare instead of medium-well (according to
    > >> your thermometer) doesn't give you any more credibility.

    >
    > > It might have been a dollar store thermometer.

    >
    > In her defense, she did say 145F. *But those are all calibrated
    > 15-20F too high per the USDA recommendations from 45 years ago.


    Yeah, when I was a kid no one ate pork medium. It was well done to
    kill the trichinosis. Most working class folks even shunned beef and
    lamb cooked less that med well.
    For quite a few years, our family would go out to a restaurant every
    Saturday night. My father wouldn't let me order a steak cooked less
    than medium.
    The old bastard ate well done steak, margarine, limited egg yolks,
    happily ate Cool Whip and drank skim milk. Give me an extra thick,
    Pittsburghed steak cooked over hickory, real butter on my baked
    potato, nice runny egg yolks, whipped cream and a nice cold glass of
    whole milk.
    >
    > Cooking and acting have some a long way since then.


    Indeed. The 50s and early 60s were the years of condensed soup as
    sauce.
    Thank you, Julia Child.
    >
    > -sw


    --Bryan

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