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Thread: The curse of unĚhot peppers

  1. #1
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default The curse of unĚhot peppers

    Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. Not just slightly hot, but mild
    like a bell pepper. (I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins, they
    often have a little heat.) So I started buying serranos, but they are
    not really hot either now. Yesterday I bought a handful of little Thai
    peppers thinking at least they would be hot. Well, some of them are,
    barely.

    This is starting to piss me off.

    Fresh habaneros, dried chilitepins and chipotles, and cayenne pepper
    don't taste right for a lot of uses, even though they are still hot.
    Maybe I need to try the Asian and Mexican grocery stores.

    Bob

  2. #2
    lil abner Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    zxcvbob wrote:
    > Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. Not just slightly hot, but mild
    > like a bell pepper. (I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins, they
    > often have a little heat.) So I started buying serranos, but they are
    > not really hot either now. Yesterday I bought a handful of little Thai
    > peppers thinking at least they would be hot. Well, some of them are,
    > barely.
    >
    > This is starting to piss me off.
    >
    > Fresh habaneros, dried chilitepins and chipotles, and cayenne pepper
    > don't taste right for a lot of uses, even though they are still hot.
    > Maybe I need to try the Asian and Mexican grocery stores.
    >
    > Bob

    Raise your own and don't harvest until ripe.
    I raised some Jalapenos one year.
    I harvested them barehanded, about half a bushel.
    For many many days some, of my favorite parts, were plenty hot.
    I can kid about it now.

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 21:30:30 -0500, zxcvbob wrote:

    > Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. Not just slightly hot, but mild
    > like a bell pepper. (I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins, they
    > often have a little heat.) So I started buying serranos, but they are
    > not really hot either now. Yesterday I bought a handful of little Thai
    > peppers thinking at least they would be hot. Well, some of them are,
    > barely.
    >
    > This is starting to piss me off.


    I think you have a problem with your hot-receptors. As far as I
    know there is no mild serrano or thai bird - and no drastic
    changes in growing conditions.

    I have not noticed any heat reduction in either of those peppers
    and I use each of them almost weekly. I've heard this from
    several people here (not the first for you), but I just think
    you're taste buds are wearing out.

    For the record, I have probably decreased my hot pepper/sauce
    consumption slightly, while others usually increase it to maintain
    the same level of heat they're used to.

    Have you tried giving one of those hot peppers to someone who
    doesn't eat hot stuff and have them try it? That should be your
    next step.

    -sw

  4. #4
    lil abner Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 21:30:30 -0500, zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >> Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. Not just slightly hot, but mild
    >> like a bell pepper. (I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins, they
    >> often have a little heat.) So I started buying serranos, but they are
    >> not really hot either now. Yesterday I bought a handful of little Thai
    >> peppers thinking at least they would be hot. Well, some of them are,
    >> barely.
    >>
    >> This is starting to piss me off.

    >
    > I think you have a problem with your hot-receptors. As far as I
    > know there is no mild serrano or thai bird - and no drastic
    > changes in growing conditions.
    >
    > I have not noticed any heat reduction in either of those peppers
    > and I use each of them almost weekly. I've heard this from
    > several people here (not the first for you), but I just think
    > you're taste buds are wearing out.
    >
    > For the record, I have probably decreased my hot pepper/sauce
    > consumption slightly, while others usually increase it to maintain
    > the same level of heat they're used to.
    >
    > Have you tried giving one of those hot peppers to someone who
    > doesn't eat hot stuff and have them try it? That should be your
    > next step.
    >
    > -sw

    They breed and grow shippers now days. Low on substance high on
    appearance. Like the empty flavorless cardboard California strawberries
    that smell somewhat good but you would have to chase me down to get me
    to eat one.

  5. #5
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    Steve wrote:

    > I think you have a problem with your hot-receptors. As far as I
    > know there is no mild serrano or thai bird - and no drastic
    > changes in growing conditions.
    >
    > I have not noticed any heat reduction in either of those peppers
    > and I use each of them almost weekly. I've heard this from
    > several people here (not the first for you), but I just think
    > you're taste buds are wearing out.


    Well, I have also run across mild serranos, and I know my heat receptors are
    *not* wearing out because a roasted locally-grown jalape˝o made me gasp with
    surprise at how hot it was.

    Bob




  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 23:12:01 -0400, lil abner wrote:

    > They breed and grow shippers now days. Low on substance high on
    > appearance. Like the empty flavorless cardboard California strawberries
    > that smell somewhat good but you would have to chase me down to get me
    > to eat one.


    Yeah, those bird peppers and sermons are pretty hard to keep from
    getting damaged.

    Not.

    -sw

  7. #7
    Christopher Helms Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Jul 11, 10:12*pm, lil abner <@daisy.mae> wrote:
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    > > On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 21:30:30 -0500, zxcvbob wrote:

    >
    > >> Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. *Not just slightly hot, but mild
    > >> like a bell pepper. *(I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins, they
    > >> often have a little heat.) *So I started buying serranos, but they are
    > >> not really hot either now. *Yesterday I bought a handful of little Thai
    > >> peppers thinking at least they would be hot. *Well, some of them are,
    > >> barely.

    >
    > >> This is starting to piss me off.

    >
    > > I think you have a problem with your hot-receptors. *As far as I
    > > know there is no mild serrano or thai bird - and no drastic
    > > changes in growing conditions.

    >
    > > I have not noticed any heat reduction in either of those peppers
    > > and I use each of them almost weekly. *I've heard this from
    > > several people here (not the first for you), but I just think
    > > you're taste buds are wearing out.

    >
    > > For the record, I have probably decreased my hot pepper/sauce
    > > consumption slightly, while others usually increase it to maintain
    > > the same level of heat they're used to.

    >
    > > Have you tried giving one of those hot peppers to someone who
    > > doesn't eat hot stuff and have them try it? *That should be your
    > > next step.

    >
    > > -sw

    >
    > They breed and grow shippers now days. Low on substance high on
    > appearance. Like the empty flavorless cardboard California strawberries
    > that smell somewhat good but you would have to chase me down to get me
    > to eat one.



    The strawberries my grandmother used to grow were good, really sweet
    right off the vine. The ones the grocery store sells look prettier,
    but they need to be macerated in sugar for about six hours just to
    make them taste vaguely like strawberries. I'd hate to see hot peppers
    going the way of strawberries (and tomatoes, cantaloupes, etc).
    Marzetti's has a pickled, "hot" pepper that used to be a lot hotter
    than it is now. I thought it was just me getting used to them, or
    maybe it was a seasonal thing, but now I'm not sure. It's like The
    Borg are taking over the produce department, replacing items with
    other, identical items, "assimilating" them. They look the same, but
    they're not the same.

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 21:58:11 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > I've heard this from several people here (not the first for you)


    I may be confusing you with notbob (I'm actually recovering from
    amnesia - so bear with me ;-) He has so many problem with
    groceries...

    -sw

  9. #9
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On 7/11/2010 9:57 PM, lil abner wrote:
    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >> Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. Not just slightly hot, but mild
    >> like a bell pepper. (I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins,
    >> they often have a little heat.) So I started buying serranos, but they
    >> are not really hot either now. Yesterday I bought a handful of little
    >> Thai peppers thinking at least they would be hot. Well, some of them
    >> are, barely.
    >>
    >> This is starting to piss me off.
    >>
    >> Fresh habaneros, dried chilitepins and chipotles, and cayenne pepper
    >> don't taste right for a lot of uses, even though they are still hot.
    >> Maybe I need to try the Asian and Mexican grocery stores.
    >>
    >> Bob

    > Raise your own and don't harvest until ripe.
    > I raised some Jalapenos one year.
    > I harvested them barehanded, about half a bushel.
    > For many many days some, of my favorite parts, were plenty hot.
    > I can kid about it now.



    I've had several years in a row of crop failures. :-( Looks like I will
    at least get a few this year.

    I made a couple of batches of picante sauce last year. My recipe has
    51 ratio of tomatoes, peppers, and onions, by weight. One batch was
    made with 2 pounds of grocery store jalape˝os. It turned out "medium"
    (I was pleased that it was that hot; the peppers were pretty mild but
    got hotter when cooked). The other batch had 1.5 pounds of the same
    barely-warm jalape˝os and 1/2 pound of home grown green jalape˝os from
    my brother's garden in Houston. That batch will knock your socks off.
    I'm going to enter a jar of the "hot" in the county fair next month.

    I think the growers are just pampering the pepper plants and then
    rushing the peppers to market before they develop their heat. I'll try
    some Fresno chile peppers next time I see them. They have to wait for
    those to turn red.

    Bob

  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 22:57:18 -0400, lil abner wrote:

    > Raise your own and don't harvest until ripe.
    > I raised some Jalapenos one year.
    > I harvested them barehanded, about half a bushel.
    > For many many days some, of my favorite parts, were plenty hot.
    > I can kid about it now.


    The capsaicin is safely enclosed *inside* the pepper. You can't
    get capsaicin on your hands from picking peppers (properly).

    -sw

  11. #11
    lil abner Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 22:57:18 -0400, lil abner wrote:
    >
    >> Raise your own and don't harvest until ripe.
    >> I raised some Jalapenos one year.
    >> I harvested them barehanded, about half a bushel.
    >> For many many days some, of my favorite parts, were plenty hot.
    >> I can kid about it now.

    >
    > The capsaicin is safely enclosed *inside* the pepper. You can't
    > get capsaicin on your hands from picking peppers (properly).
    >
    > -sw

    Wanna bet?
    It may have been from pulling off the stems afterwards of something.
    I can assure you it was memorable.
    Some of the peppers may have rupture or whatever. It's been a while.
    Properly would be with rubber gloves.
    Just breathing over that many peppers will open your sinuses.
    They do smell good though.


  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Mon, 12 Jul 2010 00:00:05 -0400, lil abner wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> The capsaicin is safely enclosed *inside* the pepper. You can't
    >> get capsaicin on your hands from picking peppers (properly).
    >>

    > Wanna bet?


    Yes.

    > It may have been from pulling off the stems afterwards of something.


    Too late. You already lost the bet. You owe me $100.

    And yes, picking the stems off can release capsaicin. But you
    don't want to pull of the stems until you're ready to use them.

    > Properly would be with rubber gloves.


    Bare hand are just fine for harvesting jalapenos.

    > Just breathing over that many peppers will open your sinuses.


    Care to lose another bet?

    Fresh picked jalapenos do not release any capsaicin or noxious
    fumes. Pulling the stems off or otherwise mutilating them will.

    -sw

  13. #13
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 20:36:32 -0700 (PDT), Christopher Helms wrote:

    > Marzetti's has a pickled, "hot" pepper that used to be a lot hotter
    > than it is now. I thought it was just me getting used to them, or
    > maybe it was a seasonal thing, but now I'm not sure.


    Marzetti does have a "Tamed Jalapeno Pepper" (waaaaay to tame for
    me - not hot at all to me). But the Cheery Peppers are the same
    heat as I always remember. I've been buying those and the Garlic
    Dill Peperoncini for decades. And the Giardinara. And the Hot
    Mix. And the Napa Valley Bistro line...

    -sw

  14. #14
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On 7/11/2010 9:30 PM, zxcvbob wrote:
    > Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. Not just slightly hot, but mild
    > like a bell pepper. (I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins, they
    > often have a little heat.) So I started buying serranos, but they are
    > not really hot either now. Yesterday I bought a handful of little Thai
    > peppers thinking at least they would be hot. Well, some of them are,
    > barely.
    >
    > This is starting to piss me off.
    >
    > Fresh habaneros, dried chilitepins and chipotles, and cayenne pepper
    > don't taste right for a lot of uses, even though they are still hot.
    > Maybe I need to try the Asian and Mexican grocery stores.
    >
    > Bob


    Either that or start testing the chiles before you buy them. Talk to
    your grocer about it, maybe they can order you some hot ones.

    I didn't even grow hot chiles this year, we can't handle the heat
    anymore, probably already burned the lining of our throats and stomachs out.

  15. #15
    Brian Anasta Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Jul 12, 12:30*pm, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    > Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. *Not just slightly hot, but mild
    > like a bell pepper. *(I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins, they
    > often have a little heat.) *So I started buying serranos, but they are
    > not really hot either now. *Yesterday I bought a handful of little Thai
    > peppers thinking at least they would be hot. *Well, some of them are,
    > barely.
    >
    > This is starting to piss me off.
    >
    > Fresh habaneros, dried chilitepins and chipotles, and cayenne pepper
    > don't taste right for a lot of uses, even though they are still hot.
    > Maybe I need to try the Asian and Mexican grocery stores.
    >
    > Bob


    Hi Bob,

    What YOU should be using are Thai grown chillies. If it is hot n spicy
    you are looking for, these will almost certainly do THE trick for you.
    Just not sure if they would be available in your local Californian
    green grocer though.

    Kind Regards,
    Brian Anasta

  16. #16
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    zxcvbob wrote:

    > Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. Not just slightly hot, but mild
    > like a bell pepper. (I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins,
    > they often have a little heat.) So I started buying serranos, but
    > they are not really hot either now. Yesterday I bought a handful of
    > little Thai peppers thinking at least they would be hot. Well, some
    > of them are, barely.
    >
    > This is starting to piss me off.


    Same here, if this can cheer you up. Only one pakistani-run store delivers
    the real deal almost always, but even there I got screwed a couple of times.

    > Fresh habaneros, dried chilitepins and chipotles, and cayenne pepper
    > don't taste right for a lot of uses, even though they are still hot.
    > Maybe I need to try the Asian and Mexican grocery stores.


    Dry cayenne pepper is practically tasteless, apart of the hotness, when I
    just want hotness I use them, the very small (1" max length) dry ones.
    --
    Vilco
    And the Family Stone




  17. #17
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. Not just slightly hot, but mild
    >like a bell pepper. (I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins, they
    >often have a little heat.) So I started buying serranos, but they are
    >not really hot either now. Yesterday I bought a handful of little Thai
    >peppers thinking at least they would be hot. Well, some of them are,
    >barely.
    >
    >This is starting to piss me off.
    >
    >Fresh habaneros, dried chilitepins and chipotles, and cayenne pepper
    >don't taste right for a lot of uses, even though they are still hot.
    >Maybe I need to try the Asian and Mexican grocery stores.


    Maybe it's you... all sensory perception occurs in the brain... did
    you ever consider that perhaps the taste sensing portion of your brain
    is dead... try shoving those peppers up your ass (TIAD). LOL

    Sorry, you gave me no choice. hehe

  18. #18
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 23:08:24 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Mon, 12 Jul 2010 00:00:05 -0400, lil abner wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >>> The capsaicin is safely enclosed *inside* the pepper. You can't
    >>> get capsaicin on your hands from picking peppers (properly).
    >>>

    >> Wanna bet?

    >
    >Yes.
    >
    >> It may have been from pulling off the stems afterwards of something.

    >
    >Too late. You already lost the bet. You owe me $100.
    >
    >And yes, picking the stems off can release capsaicin. But you
    >don't want to pull of the stems until you're ready to use them.
    >
    >> Properly would be with rubber gloves.

    >
    >Bare hand are just fine for harvesting jalapenos.
    >
    >> Just breathing over that many peppers will open your sinuses.

    >
    >Care to lose another bet?
    >
    >Fresh picked jalapenos do not release any capsaicin or noxious
    >fumes. Pulling the stems off or otherwise mutilating them will.
    >
    >-sw


    I put up pickled jalapenos every year, I leave the stems on. I dry
    various hot peppers too, the stems remain for threading... the stems
    are only removed prior to crushing after they're fully dried.

    If one is careful they won't get capsium on their hands during
    harvesting but invariably there will be peppers with soft spots, that
    have split, and have been partially eaten by critters. I harvest
    crops with garden gloves, I'm especially wary of the spines on cukes,
    I find those far more irritating than the heat of peppers.

  19. #19
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 21:58:11 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Sun, 11 Jul 2010 21:30:30 -0500, zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >> Most store-bought jalape˝os are mild. Not just slightly hot, but mild
    >> like a bell pepper. (I seek out the ones with cracks in the skins, they
    >> often have a little heat.) So I started buying serranos, but they are
    >> not really hot either now. Yesterday I bought a handful of little Thai
    >> peppers thinking at least they would be hot. Well, some of them are,
    >> barely.
    >>
    >> This is starting to piss me off.

    >
    >I think you have a problem with your hot-receptors. As far as I
    >know there is no mild serrano or thai bird - and no drastic
    >changes in growing conditions.
    >
    >I have not noticed any heat reduction in either of those peppers
    >and I use each of them almost weekly. I've heard this from
    >several people here (not the first for you), but I just think
    >you're taste buds are wearing out.
    >
    >For the record, I have probably decreased my hot pepper/sauce
    >consumption slightly, while others usually increase it to maintain
    >the same level of heat they're used to.
    >
    >Have you tried giving one of those hot peppers to someone who
    >doesn't eat hot stuff and have them try it? That should be your
    >next step.
    >
    >-sw


    I've grown hot peppers for many years and they do vary in heat
    intensity with every crop but I've never had any that are so mild that
    I'd complain, if anything I've had years when jalapenos were too hot.
    And peppers have a habit of cross pollinating... last year all my mild
    frying peppers were as hot as the hottest jalapenos... I won't be
    planting different peppers near each other anymore.

  20. #20
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: The curse of unĚhot peppers

    On Mon, 12 Jul 2010 10:54:49 -0400, brooklyn1 wrote:

    > I put up pickled jalapenos every year...


    Sure you do. Whatever you say Sheldon. Your fantasies are just
    that: imagination.

    -sw

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