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Thread: Cupcakes with margarine instead of shortening

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Cupcakes with margarine instead of shortening

    The recipe for the cupcakes I made called for 1/2 cup shortening. All
    I had available was corn oil or margarine. I normally do have
    shortening in the house, since the last one bought sat around for over
    a year since I never used it. I thought it better to use margarine
    instead of corn oil.

    The cupcakes came out ok, but my wife thought that they were "heavy"
    not light, and thought it was the margarine that caused it. I figure I
    did not beat the batter long enough since I used a spoon instead of
    the mixer. I am making the next batch for a potluck dinner, so I
    figure that most people there would not notice the difference. I hate
    to go out and buy an ingredient I will only use once with lots left
    sitting in the can.

    Thanks for any insight.

    Tom

  2. #2
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Cupcakes with margarine instead of shortening

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > The recipe for the cupcakes I made called for 1/2 cup shortening. All
    > I had available was corn oil or margarine. I normally do have
    > shortening in the house, since the last one bought sat around for over
    > a year since I never used it. I thought it better to use margarine
    > instead of corn oil.
    >
    > The cupcakes came out ok, but my wife thought that they were "heavy"
    > not light, and thought it was the margarine that caused it. I figure I
    > did not beat the batter long enough since I used a spoon instead of
    > the mixer. I am making the next batch for a potluck dinner, so I
    > figure that most people there would not notice the difference. I hate
    > to go out and buy an ingredient I will only use once with lots left
    > sitting in the can.
    >
    > Thanks for any insight.
    >
    > Tom


    >

    Butter contains water. Shortening doesn't. Shortening makes for lighter
    "fluffier" cupcakes (and cakes and cookies). Butter makes them more dense.
    I'm not much of a baker, but I do know butter makes crispy cookies and
    shortening makes chewy cookies, so it stands to reason...

    Jill


  3. #3
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Cupcakes with margarine instead of shortening

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:9bbabbc1-f0f2-4268-97e9-03cf44a5a452@f6g2000yqa.[email protected]..
    > The recipe for the cupcakes I made called for 1/2 cup shortening. All
    > I had available was corn oil or margarine. I normally do have
    > shortening in the house, since the last one bought sat around for over
    > a year since I never used it. I thought it better to use margarine
    > instead of corn oil.
    >
    > The cupcakes came out ok, but my wife thought that they were "heavy"
    > not light, and thought it was the margarine that caused it. I figure I
    > did not beat the batter long enough since I used a spoon instead of
    > the mixer. I am making the next batch for a potluck dinner, so I
    > figure that most people there would not notice the difference. I hate
    > to go out and buy an ingredient I will only use once with lots left
    > sitting in the can.
    >
    > Thanks for any insight.
    >
    > Tom




    Check your type of Margarine for water content.
    Make sure the product is not labeled spread.

    Dimitri




  4. #4
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cupcakes with margarine instead of shortening

    On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 09:06:25 -0700 (PDT), "[email protected]"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The recipe for the cupcakes I made called for 1/2 cup shortening. All
    >I had available was corn oil or margarine.


    With baking all fats are shortening.

  5. #5
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cupcakes with margarine instead of shortening

    On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 12:41:56 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> The recipe for the cupcakes I made called for 1/2 cup shortening. All
    >> I had available was corn oil or margarine. I normally do have
    >> shortening in the house, since the last one bought sat around for over
    >> a year since I never used it. I thought it better to use margarine
    >> instead of corn oil.
    >>
    >> The cupcakes came out ok, but my wife thought that they were "heavy"
    >> not light, and thought it was the margarine that caused it. I figure I
    >> did not beat the batter long enough since I used a spoon instead of
    >> the mixer. I am making the next batch for a potluck dinner, so I
    >> figure that most people there would not notice the difference. I hate
    >> to go out and buy an ingredient I will only use once with lots left
    >> sitting in the can.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any insight.
    >>
    >> Tom

    >
    >>

    >Butter contains water. Shortening doesn't.


    But baked goods call for some liquid, just use a few drops less...
    wouldn't matter but if one is obsessive compulsive... about 30% of the
    water in baked goods evaporates anyway while baking and even
    afterwards.

  6. #6
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Cupcakes with margarine instead of shortening


    <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > The cupcakes came out ok, but my wife thought that they were "heavy"
    > not light, and thought it was the margarine that caused it. I figure I
    > did not beat the batter long enough since I used a spoon instead of
    > the mixer. I am making the next batch for a potluck dinner, so I
    > figure that most people there would not notice the difference. I hate
    > to go out and buy an ingredient I will only use once with lots left
    > sitting in the can.
    >
    > Thanks for any insight.


    Margarine is a shortening and it will work. Difference in texture can be the
    type of mixing though. I never checked the density of Crisco versus
    margarine either, but there is a difference in hardness at room temperature.
    Give the mixer a try next time.




  7. #7
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Cupcakes with margarine instead of shortening

    On 8/16/2010 11:06 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    > The recipe for the cupcakes I made called for 1/2 cup shortening. All
    > I had available was corn oil or margarine. I normally do have
    > shortening in the house, since the last one bought sat around for over
    > a year since I never used it. I thought it better to use margarine
    > instead of corn oil.
    >
    > The cupcakes came out ok, but my wife thought that they were "heavy"
    > not light, and thought it was the margarine that caused it. I figure I
    > did not beat the batter long enough since I used a spoon instead of
    > the mixer. I am making the next batch for a potluck dinner, so I
    > figure that most people there would not notice the difference. I hate
    > to go out and buy an ingredient I will only use once with lots left
    > sitting in the can.
    >
    > Thanks for any insight.
    >
    > Tom



    Shortening has 120 calories per tablespoon because it is 100% fat.
    Butter and margarine have 100 calories per tablespoon, which is mostly
    fat with a little bit of whey (etc), but should be close enough to use
    in a cake recipe. (it's enough moisture to really change a cookie recipe
    though) A lot of the stuff that passes for margarine these days is not
    really margarine but reduced calorie "spread" that has a much higher
    moisture content. If it's at least 90 calories per tablespoon, you're
    probably still alright. Much lower than that and you are adding too
    much water and not enough fat to the cake unless you increase the amount
    of "margarine" and decrease the milk.

    Real margarine (if you can find it) costs almost as much as real butter
    lately. So I buy real butter (on sale) to cook with, and Smart Balance
    spread for eating.

    Bob

  8. #8
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Cupcakes with margarine instead of shortening

    On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 21:50:07 -0500, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 8/16/2010 11:06 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    >> The recipe for the cupcakes I made called for 1/2 cup shortening. All
    >> I had available was corn oil or margarine. I normally do have
    >> shortening in the house, since the last one bought sat around for over
    >> a year since I never used it. I thought it better to use margarine
    >> instead of corn oil.
    >>
    >> The cupcakes came out ok, but my wife thought that they were "heavy"
    >> not light, and thought it was the margarine that caused it. I figure I
    >> did not beat the batter long enough since I used a spoon instead of
    >> the mixer. I am making the next batch for a potluck dinner, so I
    >> figure that most people there would not notice the difference. I hate
    >> to go out and buy an ingredient I will only use once with lots left
    >> sitting in the can.
    >>
    >> Thanks for any insight.
    >>
    >> Tom

    >
    >
    >Shortening has 120 calories per tablespoon because it is 100% fat.


    In baking your use of the word "Shortening" is meaningless in this
    context; in baking ALL fats (solid and liquid) are shortening.

    http://www.thedailyplate.com/nutriti...es/food/crisco

    >Butter and margarine have 100 calories per tablespoon, which is mostly
    >fat with a little bit of whey (etc),


    That would be milk solids, not whey.

    Butter in the US contains about 8% water. It's difficult to acertain
    the precise caloric content per volume of these solid fats due to the
    incorporation of air. In any event the caloric content of solid fats
    contained therein is pretty much meaningless... anyone worried about
    10% fewer fat calories only need take a smaller portion. In dieting
    use a scale, volume measurements are useless.

    Anyone who considers themself a foodie should never use the word
    "shortening" when they can use the word "fat"... culinarilly
    shortening is ALWAYS a verb, NEVER a noun.


  9. #9
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Cupcakes with margarine instead of shortening


    brooklyn1;1519612 Wrote:
    > On Mon, 16 Aug 2010 21:50:07 -0500, zxcvbob [email protected]
    > wrote:
    > -
    > On 8/16/2010 11:06 AM, [email protected] wrote:-
    > The recipe for the cupcakes I made called for 1/2 cup shortening. All
    > I had available was corn oil or margarine. I normally do have
    > shortening in the house, since the last one bought sat around for over
    > a year since I never used it. I thought it better to use margarine
    > instead of corn oil.
    >
    > The cupcakes came out ok, but my wife thought that they were "heavy"
    > not light, and thought it was the margarine that caused it. I figure I
    > did not beat the batter long enough since I used a spoon instead of
    > the mixer. I am making the next batch for a potluck dinner, so I
    > figure that most people there would not notice the difference. I hate
    > to go out and buy an ingredient I will only use once with lots left
    > sitting in the can.
    >
    > Thanks for any insight.
    >
    > Tom-
    >
    >
    > Shortening has 120 calories per tablespoon because it is 100% fat. -
    >
    > In baking your use of the word "Shortening" is meaningless in this
    > context; in baking ALL fats (solid and liquid) are shortening.
    >
    > 'Crisco Nutrition Facts, Calories, Fat, Protein, and Diet Information -
    > Food Search Results - The Daily Plate Calorie Counter'
    > (http://www.thedailyplate.com/nutriti...es/food/crisco)
    > -
    > Butter and margarine have 100 calories per tablespoon, which is mostly
    > fat with a little bit of whey (etc), -
    >
    > That would be milk solids, not whey.
    >
    > Butter in the US contains about 8% water. It's difficult to acertain
    > the precise caloric content per volume of these solid fats due to the
    > incorporation of air. In any event the caloric content of solid fats
    > contained therein is pretty much meaningless... anyone worried about
    > 10% fewer fat calories only need take a smaller portion. In dieting
    > use a scale, volume measurements are useless.
    >
    > Anyone who considers themself a foodie should never use the word
    > "shortening" when they can use the word "fat"... culinarilly
    > shortening is ALWAYS a verb, NEVER a noun.


    I think bacon fat might help out a bit. What's with the prices of bacon
    lately, though. I always save the fat, even when it's cheap. Real butter
    **** pounds margarine. Margarine is good for feeding inmates. Enjoy
    butter. You can still by salt ffree or move on to lard.




    --
    Gorio

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