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Thread: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason . Now I'm
    thinking I'll chiaafy the front of my house. Or maybe the roof.
    Will chia grow on asphalt or limestone? What makes it stick to the
    clay when they "spread" it on?

    Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    edible. Or at least make you wish you had some real food.

    -sw

  2. #2
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason . Now I'm
    > thinking I'll chiaafy the front of my house. Or maybe the roof.
    > Will chia grow on asphalt or limestone? What makes it stick to the
    > clay when they "spread" it on?
    >
    > Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    > from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    > edible. Or at least make you wish you had some real food.
    >
    > -sw


    Chia seeds are a traditional food of the native american tribe featured
    in the book, "Born to Run," see

    http://www.amazon.com/Born-Run-Hidde.../dp/0307266303

    My wife has started having some for their health benefits - once a day,
    she puts a teaspoon (?) of the seeds into a glass of water, lets it sit
    for five minutes, and drinks it. She's been doing this for a few months
    now, and when I ask her how she likes the whole business, she nods her
    head in the affirmative - pleased, although I wouldn't say enthusiastic.

    If you Google the name of the tribe, Tarahumara, along with the words
    like chia or diet or recipes, you'll find plenty to read.

    If you've ever been a runner (I used to be), you'll enjoy reading the
    book as well.

    -S-



  3. #3
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    In article <19z7p8a5km3ux$.[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason .


    > Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    > from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    > edible.


    Bad logic. I buy lye and bleach at the grocery store.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  4. #4
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    On Wed 17 Nov 2010 11:53:12p, Sqwertz told us...

    > I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason . Now I'm
    > thinking I'll chiaafy the front of my house. Or maybe the roof.
    > Will chia grow on asphalt or limestone? What makes it stick to the
    > clay when they "spread" it on?
    >
    > Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    > from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    > edible. Or at least make you wish you had some real food.
    >
    > -sw
    >


    First you grow the chia pet. Then you slaughter and eat it.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  5. #5
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    In article <[email protected] 1>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed 17 Nov 2010 11:53:12p, Sqwertz told us...
    >
    > > I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason . Now I'm
    > > thinking I'll chiaafy the front of my house. Or maybe the roof.
    > > Will chia grow on asphalt or limestone? What makes it stick to the
    > > clay when they "spread" it on?
    > >
    > > Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    > > from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    > > edible. Or at least make you wish you had some real food.
    > >
    > > -sw
    > >

    >
    > First you grow the chia pet. Then you slaughter and eat it.


    That's actually not too far from the truth. <g> My mom had a chia pet.
    It was a lion and the grooves for the seeds were carved into the head
    and upper neck. When the chia sprouted, the lion had a lovely green mane.

    Mom would clip some of the sprouts for salads.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or
    no influence on society. -- Mark Twain

  6. #6
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > Barring that, are these things of any culinary use?


    A quick google search showed plenty of recipe discussion. Looks like
    they make a thickener when soaked in water.

  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    On Thu, 18 Nov 2010 08:40:02 -0500, Steve Freides wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason . Now I'm
    >> thinking I'll chiaafy the front of my house. Or maybe the roof.
    >> Will chia grow on asphalt or limestone? What makes it stick to the
    >> clay when they "spread" it on?
    >>
    >> Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    >> from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    >> edible. Or at least make you wish you had some real food.
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > Chia seeds are a traditional food of the native american tribe featured
    > in the book, "Born to Run," see
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/Born-Run-Hidde.../dp/0307266303
    >
    > My wife has started having some for their health benefits - once a day,
    > she puts a teaspoon (?) of the seeds into a glass of water, lets it sit
    > for five minutes, and drinks it. She's been doing this for a few months
    > now, and when I ask her how she likes the whole business, she nods her
    > head in the affirmative - pleased, although I wouldn't say enthusiastic.


    Seeds are a great source of all sorts of micronutrients and other
    beneficial compounds (most of which we don't even know yet) that
    it's hard to realize they're doing any good.

    > If you Google the name of the tribe, Tarahumara, along with the words
    > like chia or diet or recipes, you'll find plenty to read.


    I'm sure they're healthy, but that's why I added the disclaimer,
    "...wishing for real food" ;-)

    If I had to eat them I'd just chew them raw like I did pot seeds
    (back when pot come with seeds). I can see how many people would
    have a problem with seed hulls sticking to their teeth. Or worse -
    my personal peeve - that lone half seed hull suctioning itself to
    the back of the of the tongue (don't you just hate that?)

    -sw

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    On Thu, 18 Nov 2010 07:59:10 -0800, Dan Abel wrote:

    > In article <19z7p8a5km3ux$.[email protected]>,
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason .

    >
    >> Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    >> from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    >> edible.

    >
    > Bad logic. I buy lye and bleach at the grocery store.


    Lye is used to make cure olives, corn, fish, and rice noodles. But
    you can't buy it at the grocery store any more.

    Chlorine bleach is used in more food applications than you'd like
    to know. You probably drink it every day, at least.

    But I've ever seen anything I can kill anybody with in the bulk
    bins. (or myself ;-)

    -sw

    I don't think they sell lye at the grocery store any more, now that
    Red Devil jas been pulled from t used to be in Red Devil Drain
    Cleaner

  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    On 18 Nov 2010 16:03:31 GMT, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > On Wed 17 Nov 2010 11:53:12p, Sqwertz told us...
    >
    >> I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason . Now I'm
    >> thinking I'll chiaafy the front of my house. Or maybe the roof.
    >> Will chia grow on asphalt or limestone? What makes it stick to the
    >> clay when they "spread" it on?
    >>
    >> Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    >> from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    >> edible. Or at least make you wish you had some real food.

    >
    > First you grow the chia pet. Then you slaughter and eat it.


    Best answer yet :-) I sprinkle a lamb shoulder chop with some and
    give it TLC for 9 months.

    ObFood: Which burns 100 calories faster, sex or housecleaning?

    -sw

  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    In article <8fnr9rdi025w$.[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I don't think they sell lye at the grocery store any more, now that
    > Red Devil jas been pulled from t used to be in Red Devil Drain
    > Cleaner


    A quick google shows there is plenty available on line. :-)
    From what I understand, it was pulled as a common product due to being
    used in garage drug labs?
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or
    no influence on society. -- Mark Twain

  11. #11
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    Sqwertz wrote:

    > I'm sure they're healthy, but that's why I added the disclaimer,
    > "...wishing for real food" ;-)


    They are already someone's "real" food, the Tarahumara.

    I'm not saying you have to like them, but if they're an acquired taste,
    you might have to try them for a while before giving up. Or not - your
    choice, of course.

    -S-





  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    On Thu, 18 Nov 2010 19:55:58 -0500, Steve Freides wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> I'm sure they're healthy, but that's why I added the disclaimer,
    >> "...wishing for real food" ;-)

    >
    > They are already someone's "real" food, the Tarahumara.
    >
    > I'm not saying you have to like them, but if they're an acquired taste,
    > you might have to try them for a while before giving up. Or not - your
    > choice, of course.


    OK, I admit I didn't even STFW before I posted. The seed has
    interesting properties, worth experimenting with.

    http://pals2u.tripod.com/id20.html
    (probably not the most credible site - Tripod. But enough to
    warrant reading more)

    -sw

  13. #13
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    On Thu, 18 Nov 2010 20:03:52 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >> Barring that, are these things of any culinary use?

    >
    > A quick google search showed plenty of recipe discussion. Looks like
    > they make a thickener when soaked in water.


    But... has anybody her ever eaten them? There's recipes out there
    for jenkem, but that doesn't mean anybody is actually using them.

    -sw

  14. #14
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?

    On 18 Nov 2010 16:03:31 GMT, Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > On Wed 17 Nov 2010 11:53:12p, Sqwertz told us...
    >
    >> I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason . Now I'm
    >> thinking I'll chiaafy the front of my house. Or maybe the roof.
    >> Will chia grow on asphalt or limestone? What makes it stick to the
    >> clay when they "spread" it on?
    >>
    >> Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    >> from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    >> edible. Or at least make you wish you had some real food.
    >>
    >> -sw
    >>

    >
    > First you grow the chia pet. Then you slaughter and eat it.


    <snort>

    lotsa minerals there, i bet.

    your pal,
    blake

  15. #15
    Paco Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?



    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:19z7p8a5km3ux$.[email protected]..
    > I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason . Now I'm
    > thinking I'll chiaafy the front of my house. Or maybe the roof.
    > Will chia grow on asphalt or limestone? What makes it stick to the
    > clay when they "spread" it on?
    >
    > Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    > from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    > edible. Or at least make you wish you had some real food.
    >
    > -sw


    It's all the rage at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue:

    https://www.americanchia.com/flare/next?rtag=chiaobama&


  16. #16
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?


    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Wed 17 Nov 2010 11:53:12p, Sqwertz told us...
    >
    >> I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason . Now I'm
    >> thinking I'll chiaafy the front of my house. Or maybe the roof.
    >> Will chia grow on asphalt or limestone? What makes it stick to the
    >> clay when they "spread" it on?
    >>
    >> Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    >> from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    >> edible. Or at least make you wish you had some real food.
    >>
    >> -sw
    >>

    >
    > First you grow the chia pet. Then you slaughter and eat it.


    You've got it all wrong.

    Feed a pound of chia seeds to your dog, and give plenty of water. In about a
    week, you will begin recieving a perpetual supply of salad.

    MartyB



  17. #17
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Culinary uses for chia seeds?


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:19z7p8a5km3ux$.[email protected]..
    >I bought a half pound of these for no apparent reason . Now I'm
    > thinking I'll chiaafy the front of my house. Or maybe the roof.
    > Will chia grow on asphalt or limestone? What makes it stick to the
    > clay when they "spread" it on?
    >
    > Barring that, are these things of any culinary use? I bought them
    > from a grocery store (Newflower Market), so I figure they must be
    > edible. Or at least make you wish you had some real food.


    I just gel them (put in water and then in the fridge overnight) and then eat
    them in the morning. Just a few spoonfuls in a small paper cup. They have
    very little taste. Perhaps slightly nutty. But they are a great source of
    easily digestible protein.

    The guy who runs my health food store said he puts his in smoothies. He
    gels his too, but he said you can use them as is. Gelling them does make
    all of the nutrients more easily absorbable to the body. In made a smoothie
    for my daughter with them and she hated it.

    Raw foodists will add them to any smooth and creamy foods, like salad
    dressings and puddings.

    I think they can be used interchangeably for flax seeds because they both
    form a gel in water and have the same sort of consistency.

    I don't think they are the sort of thing that people eat for the taste. I
    think they eat them for the health benefits.



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