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Thread: Critique a recipe I just made up

  1. #1
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Critique a recipe I just made up

    I'm not sure about the sesame seeds; I've never used them before, but
    I see lots of them in the Mexican market. Also don't know if I have
    the proportions right -- they should be close, but 2 moritas might be
    too much or not enough (they are pretty powerful) and the amount of
    salt or cumin (etc) might not be right.

    Moritas if you don't know, are the cheaper black dried chipotles you
    can buy at a Mexican market. True chipotles are larger and brown, and
    kind of look like a cigar butt, They are seldom available because
    Mexico consumes most of them instead of exporting them.

    *Vegetarian Tamales #1*

    1 pkg (14 oz) Firm tofu, diced small
    1 can (15 oz) Black beans, drained and rinsed
    3 Dried ancho chiles
    2 Dried morita chiles (can substitute dried chipotles, which are
    smokier and not as hot)
    1 (large) Maggi vegetable bouillon cube
    2 1/2 cups Boiling water
    1 1/2 tsp Ground cumin
    3 Garlic cloves, peeled
    2 Tbsp Dried chopped onions
    2 Tbsp Sesame seeds
    1/2 tsp Salt
    1/4 tsp Pepper
    1 tsp Dried oregano

    Tear chiles apart, discarding stems and most of the seeds. Dissolve
    bouillon cube in boiling water; add chiles and soak until soft.
    Drain, reserving the liquid. Set 1.5 cups of the liquid aside and
    pour the rest in blender. Add soaked chiles, cumin and garlic, and
    blend until smooth (add additional water as necessary to make a
    paste.) Combine the tofu and beans. Stir in the chile paste, dried
    onions, sesame seeds, oregano, salt and pepper. Allow flavors to
    blend while you make the masa dough, then taste and adjust seasonings.

    2 dozen Corn husks, soaked

    2 1/2 cups Masa harina mix
    1 1/2 cups Chile soaking broth, cooled
    1 cup Coconut oil or vegetable shortening

    Stir together masa harina and broth and set aside. Beat shortening
    until fluffy. Add in the masa dough a little at a time, beating until
    very light and fluffy.

    To assemble: Drain corn husks and pat dry. Spread 2 or 3 tablespoons
    of dough on center of husks forming a rectangle and spreading to right
    or left edge. Spoon a tablespoon of filling lengthwise down center of
    rectangle. Fold the masa-to-the-edge side over the filling and allow
    the plain part of the husk to wrap around. Fold the bottom end up.
    Secure (optional) with string or a strip of corn husk and place
    standing-on-end in steamer basket. Put any leftover corn husks loose
    on top. Steam tamales for about an hour or two, until done.

    Note: you can fold both ends, but I find it a lot easier to roll the
    tamal with a taper to it and only fold one end. I only tie the first
    few that I make. After that, they hold themselves folded in the steamer.

    --
    Bob

  2. #2
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    On 12/16/2010 1:16 PM, zxcvbob wrote:
    > I'm not sure about the sesame seeds; I've never used them before, but
    > I see lots of them in the Mexican market. Also don't know if I have
    > the proportions right -- they should be close, but 2 moritas might be
    > too much or not enough (they are pretty powerful) and the amount of
    > salt or cumin (etc) might not be right.
    >
    > Moritas if you don't know, are the cheaper black dried chipotles you
    > can buy at a Mexican market. True chipotles are larger and brown, and
    > kind of look like a cigar butt, They are seldom available because
    > Mexico consumes most of them instead of exporting them.
    >
    > *Vegetarian Tamales #1*
    >
    > 1 pkg (14 oz) Firm tofu, diced small
    > 1 can (15 oz) Black beans, drained and rinsed
    > 3 Dried ancho chiles
    > 2 Dried morita chiles (can substitute dried chipotles, which are
    > smokier and not as hot)
    > 1 (large) Maggi vegetable bouillon cube
    > 2 1/2 cups Boiling water
    > 1 1/2 tsp Ground cumin
    > 3 Garlic cloves, peeled
    > 2 Tbsp Dried chopped onions
    > 2 Tbsp Sesame seeds
    > 1/2 tsp Salt
    > 1/4 tsp Pepper
    > 1 tsp Dried oregano
    >
    > Tear chiles apart, discarding stems and most of the seeds. Dissolve
    > bouillon cube in boiling water; add chiles and soak until soft. Drain,
    > reserving the liquid. Set 1.5 cups of the liquid aside and pour the
    > rest in blender. Add soaked chiles, cumin and garlic, and blend until
    > smooth (add additional water as necessary to make a paste.) Combine
    > the tofu and beans. Stir in the chile paste, dried onions, sesame
    > seeds, oregano, salt and pepper. Allow flavors to blend while you
    > make the masa dough, then taste and adjust seasonings.

    snip...


    That recipe sounds good, how were they?

    Becca

  3. #3
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    Ema Nymton wrote:
    >
    > That recipe sounds good, how were they?
    >
    > Becca



    I haven't made them yet. :-) It's so much work, I wanted to know if
    anybody saw any obvious flaws first. I will probably try them next
    week while I'm taking some leftover vacation days.

    Bob

  4. #4
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    Ema wrote on Thu, 16 Dec 2010 16:46:07 -0600:

    > On 12/16/2010 1:16 PM, zxcvbob wrote:
    >> I'm not sure about the sesame seeds; I've never used them
    >> before, but I see lots of them in the Mexican market. Also
    >> don't know if I have the proportions right -- they should be close,
    >> but 2 moritas might be too much or not enough (they
    >> are pretty powerful) and the amount of salt or cumin (etc)
    >> might not be right.
    >>
    >> Moritas if you don't know, are the cheaper black dried
    >> chipotles you can buy at a Mexican market. True chipotles
    >> are larger and brown, and kind of look like a cigar butt,
    >> They are seldom available because Mexico consumes most of
    >> them instead of exporting them.
    >>
    >> *Vegetarian Tamales #1*
    >>
    >> 1 pkg (14 oz) Firm tofu, diced small
    >> 1 can (15 oz) Black beans, drained and rinsed
    >> 3 Dried ancho chiles
    >> 2 Dried morita chiles (can substitute dried chipotles, which are
    >> smokier and not as hot) 1 (large) Maggi vegetable
    >> bouillon cube 2 1/2 cups Boiling water 1 1/2 tsp Ground cumin
    >> 3 Garlic cloves, peeled
    >> 2 Tbsp Dried chopped onions
    >> 2 Tbsp Sesame seeds
    >> 1/2 tsp Salt
    >> 1/4 tsp Pepper
    >> 1 tsp Dried oregano
    >>
    >> Tear chiles apart, discarding stems and most of the seeds. Dissolve
    >> bouillon cube in boiling water; add chiles and soak until soft.
    >> Drain, reserving the liquid. Set 1.5 cups of the
    >> liquid aside and pour the rest in blender. Add soaked
    >> chiles, cumin and garlic, and blend until smooth (add
    >> additional water as necessary to make a paste.) Combine the tofu and
    >> beans. Stir in the chile paste, dried onions,
    >> sesame seeds, oregano, salt and pepper. Allow flavors to
    >> blend while you make the masa dough, then taste and adjust
    >> seasonings.

    > snip...


    > That recipe sounds good, how were they?


    It looks worth trying but my view on tofu being what it is: a tasteless
    protein additive, I can't really argue except to wonder if cooked animal
    protein like chicken would taste better *to me*

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  5. #5
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    James Silverton wrote:

    > It looks worth trying but my view on tofu being what it is: a tasteless
    > protein additive, I can't really argue except to wonder if cooked animal
    > protein like chicken would taste better *to me*
    >



    I have a vegetarian in the house for the holidays, and took it as a
    challenge. (that's why they have vegetable fat instead of animal fat)

    I usually use turkey or chicken when I make tamales (instead of tofu
    and beans) and I use goose fat in the masa. I should really do pork
    and green chili tamales sometime, with freshly rendered pork fat.

    Mmmmm... Pork fat. <drool>

    Bob

  6. #6
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I'm not sure about the sesame seeds; I've never used them before, but I
    > see lots of them in the Mexican market. Also don't know if I have the
    > proportions right -- they should be close, but 2 moritas might be too much
    > or not enough (they are pretty powerful) and the amount of salt or cumin
    > (etc) might not be right.
    >
    > Moritas if you don't know, are the cheaper black dried chipotles you can
    > buy at a Mexican market. True chipotles are larger and brown, and kind of
    > look like a cigar butt, They are seldom available because Mexico consumes
    > most of them instead of exporting them.
    >
    > *Vegetarian Tamales #1*
    >
    > 1 pkg (14 oz) Firm tofu, diced small
    > 1 can (15 oz) Black beans, drained and rinsed
    > 3 Dried ancho chiles
    > 2 Dried morita chiles (can substitute dried chipotles, which are smokier
    > and not as hot)
    > 1 (large) Maggi vegetable bouillon cube
    > 2 1/2 cups Boiling water
    > 1 1/2 tsp Ground cumin
    > 3 Garlic cloves, peeled
    > 2 Tbsp Dried chopped onions
    > 2 Tbsp Sesame seeds
    > 1/2 tsp Salt
    > 1/4 tsp Pepper
    > 1 tsp Dried oregano
    >
    > Tear chiles apart, discarding stems and most of the seeds. Dissolve
    > bouillon cube in boiling water; add chiles and soak until soft. Drain,
    > reserving the liquid. Set 1.5 cups of the liquid aside and pour the rest
    > in blender. Add soaked chiles, cumin and garlic, and blend until smooth
    > (add additional water as necessary to make a paste.) Combine the tofu and
    > beans. Stir in the chile paste, dried onions, sesame seeds, oregano, salt
    > and pepper. Allow flavors to blend while you make the masa dough, then
    > taste and adjust seasonings.
    >
    > 2 dozen Corn husks, soaked
    >
    > 2 1/2 cups Masa harina mix
    > 1 1/2 cups Chile soaking broth, cooled
    > 1 cup Coconut oil or vegetable shortening
    >
    > Stir together masa harina and broth and set aside. Beat shortening until
    > fluffy. Add in the masa dough a little at a time, beating until very
    > light and fluffy.
    >
    > To assemble: Drain corn husks and pat dry. Spread 2 or 3 tablespoons of
    > dough on center of husks forming a rectangle and spreading to right or
    > left edge. Spoon a tablespoon of filling lengthwise down center of
    > rectangle. Fold the masa-to-the-edge side over the filling and allow the
    > plain part of the husk to wrap around. Fold the bottom end up. Secure
    > (optional) with string or a strip of corn husk and place standing-on-end
    > in steamer basket. Put any leftover corn husks loose on top. Steam
    > tamales for about an hour or two, until done.
    >
    > Note: you can fold both ends, but I find it a lot easier to roll the tamal
    > with a taper to it and only fold one end. I only tie the first few that I
    > make. After that, they hold themselves folded in the steamer.
    >
    > --
    > Bob



    Poncho Villa is turning in his grave. ( and may come after you)

    Just kidding - Why do this?

    Dimitri



  7. #7
    sueb Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    On Dec 16, 3:10*pm, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    > James Silverton wrote:
    > > It looks worth trying but my view on tofu being what it is: a tasteless
    > > protein additive, I can't really argue except to wonder if cooked animal
    > > protein like chicken would taste better *to me*

    >
    > I have a vegetarian in the house for the holidays, and took it as a
    > challenge. *(that's why they have vegetable fat instead of animal fat)
    >
    > I usually use turkey or chicken when I make tamales (instead of tofu
    > and beans) and I use goose fat in the masa. *I should really do pork
    > and green chili tamales sometime, with freshly rendered pork fat.
    >
    > Mmmmm... Pork fat. <drool>
    >
    > Bob


    Why even put in the tofu? Go with something more "authentic" like
    corn or another type of bean or squash. If they are not vegan, you
    could include hard boiled egg, if protein is a concern.

    It also sounds pretty bland, setting aside the heat from the chiles.
    There's nothing to provide a zing taste to it. With meat, you don't
    need a zing because you have all that pork fat to satisfy your
    tongue. How about including raisins or substituting pepitas for the
    sesame seeds?

    Susan B.

  8. #8
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    On 12/16/2010 6:47 PM, sueb wrote:
    > On Dec 16, 3:10 pm, zxcvbob<zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    >> James Silverton wrote:
    >>> It looks worth trying but my view on tofu being what it is: a tasteless
    >>> protein additive, I can't really argue except to wonder if cooked animal
    >>> protein like chicken would taste better *to me*

    >>
    >> I have a vegetarian in the house for the holidays, and took it as a
    >> challenge. (that's why they have vegetable fat instead of animal fat)
    >>
    >> I usually use turkey or chicken when I make tamales (instead of tofu
    >> and beans) and I use goose fat in the masa. I should really do pork
    >> and green chili tamales sometime, with freshly rendered pork fat.
    >>
    >> Mmmmm... Pork fat.<drool>
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    > Why even put in the tofu? Go with something more "authentic" like
    > corn or another type of bean or squash. If they are not vegan, you
    > could include hard boiled egg, if protein is a concern.
    >
    > It also sounds pretty bland, setting aside the heat from the chiles.
    > There's nothing to provide a zing taste to it. With meat, you don't
    > need a zing because you have all that pork fat to satisfy your
    > tongue. How about including raisins or substituting pepitas for the
    > sesame seeds?
    >
    > Susan B.


    That's just the kind of comments I was looking for.

    I like the pepitas idea. Would some grated cojita (sp?) cheese help? I
    thought the tofu would absorb and carry the chile and garlic better than
    corn is why I added it.

    I also have some fake chicken TVP that I bought from the Mexican market.
    (I add it to bouillon and hotsauce at work sometimes for a light lunch
    that's healthier than ramen.) It might make a good filling.

    Bob

  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    Susan wrote:

    > Why even put in the tofu? Go with something more "authentic" like corn or
    > another type of bean or squash. If they are not vegan, you could include
    > hard boiled egg, if protein is a concern.


    ....or cheese.


    > It also sounds pretty bland, setting aside the heat from the chiles.
    > There's nothing to provide a zing taste to it. With meat, you don't need
    > a zing because you have all that pork fat to satisfy your tongue. How
    > about including raisins or substituting pepitas for the sesame seeds?


    If you think *that's* bland, you must absolutely hate chiles rellenos!

    I think the sesame seeds sound good, and there should be zing from the
    cumin, chiles, and garlic. Cheese would also provide an extra flavor, but
    I'm not sure whether the "special" diner is vegan or not. One other thing
    which I'd do to perk it up is to squeeze lime juice onto the tamales at
    serving time.

    Bob



  10. #10
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    James Silverton <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It looks worth trying but my view on tofu being what it is: a tasteless
    >protein additive, I can't really argue except to wonder if cooked animal
    >protein like chicken would taste better *to me*


    I personally like tofu (it is not without taste), but I don't think it
    would go well in the interior of a tamale for texture reasons -- even
    firm tofu.

    On the other hand, I often will smother a tamale with tofu in enchilada
    sauce. Everyone I've prepared that for really likes it. It is also
    semi-common for veggie-oriented Mexican restaurants around here to
    put tofu on top of (as opposed to into) rolled enchiladas.

    I think the issue is that tofu does not compactify very well --
    it crumbles. For something like a tamale filling you want a mixture
    that can stand up to a little pressure, blending its flavors in
    with the masa but staying in place rather than spreading out.

    Steve

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    In article <[email protected]>,
    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ema Nymton wrote:
    > >
    > > That recipe sounds good, how were they?
    > >
    > > Becca

    >
    >
    > I haven't made them yet. :-) It's so much work, I wanted to know if
    > anybody saw any obvious flaws first. I will probably try them next
    > week while I'm taking some leftover vacation days.
    >
    > Bob


    For a start, I'd personally lose the Tofu and substitute Zucchini or
    Mushrooms.

    But that's just me!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    "One man's theology is another man's belly laugh."
    --Robert Heinelien

  12. #12
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up


    zxcvbob;1561274 Wrote:
    > James Silverton wrote:
    > -
    > It looks worth trying but my view on tofu being what it is: a tasteless
    >
    > protein additive, I can't really argue except to wonder if cooked
    > animal
    > protein like chicken would taste better *to me*
    > -
    >
    >
    > I have a vegetarian in the house for the holidays, and took it as a
    > challenge. (that's why they have vegetable fat instead of animal fat)
    >
    > I usually use turkey or chicken when I make tamales (instead of tofu
    > and beans) and I use goose fat in the masa. I should really do pork
    > and green chili tamales sometime, with freshly rendered pork fat.
    >
    > Mmmmm... Pork fat. drool
    >
    > Bob


    No tofu, bud. Yuck! Think of raisins (you'd be surprised) or something,
    ANYTHING, but tofu. I'm with Mr. Silverton here.

    A little extra color/flavor if you infuse a bit of achiote color/flavor
    into the pork fat or broth. Deep red color for the holidays with a mild
    flavor that will please all tastes (at least in my experience). Go ahead
    and tofu a sauce with it. I've never tried that. I just like a simple
    tomatillo/chile salsa on my stuff. Pepitas are nice along with some
    sesame might be a nice twist. Mexicans that live around me use raisins,
    and they turn out beautifully.




    --
    Gorio

  13. #13
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Critique a recipe I just made up

    On Thu, 16 Dec 2010 13:16:33 -0600, zxcvbob wrote:

    > Moritas if you don't know, are the cheaper black dried chipotles you
    > can buy at a Mexican market. True chipotles are larger and brown, and
    > kind of look like a cigar butt, They are seldom available because
    > Mexico consumes most of them instead of exporting them.


    We have plenty of both here. The Mexican markets themselves only
    carry the cigar butts but the moras and moritas are available at
    the White people stores.

    I stopped reading the recipe after I saw tofu, so no comment. not
    fair I know. I do make ma po tofu, but that's it for tofu for me.

    -sw

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